Definition of collar in English:

collar

noun

  • 1A band of material around the neck of a shirt, dress, coat, or jacket, either upright or turned over and generally an integral part of the garment.

    ‘we turned our collars up against the chill’
    • ‘Mark stood in blue uniform with gold stripes on his collar and black weapons handing from his belt.’
    • ‘The dangling detached polo shirt collars and tiny tee shirts may take some getting used to.’
    • ‘A blue chambray shirt with a button-downed collar was tucked neatly into the waistband of a pair of perfectly fitting black jeans.’
    • ‘A Silver eagle broach is pinned to her cloth coat, a Hermes scarf splashes pink and black across the collar.’
    • ‘A black suit, a collar, an air of piety: the uniform requirements of men of the cloth.’
    • ‘Regardless of your taste in music, spangled shirts, four inch collars, glitzy sunglasses and platform shoes are in.’
    • ‘Nervously he tried to straighten his crumpled lab coat and shirt collar.’
    • ‘There were three of them, of whom one with a long beard looked venerable; and they had red cloth collars round their necks and gold lace on their sleeves like Government officials.’
    • ‘He was wearing a white shirt with a collar, dark trousers and a three-quarter length jacket.’
    • ‘In the context of an interview with mainstream corporate America, it's best to cover your tattoos and piercings with long-sleeved shirts, blouses, collars, and such.’
    • ‘Dirty cuffs and collars and destroyed shirt fronts were commonplace then.’
    • ‘A shirt with a Chinese collar or high roll-neck, minus necktie, can spell casual elegance.’
    • ‘He looked really nice, in a track suit, I think it was mainly blue and lime green with bits of yellow and red round the collar.’
    • ‘Another popular vintage detail is a shirt collar made from a different fabric, usually a knit.’
    • ‘I was hiding my face in the collar of my black velvet blazer, away from the sight of the class.’
    • ‘The coat was patterned red and gold like the wallpaper in the dining room of a stately home, had a round collar and was fastened with large gold military buttons.’
    • ‘I sighed and grabbed Black by the collar and pulled him in to whisper my problem to him.’
    • ‘She appreciatively fingered the delicate lace collar and black velvet trim.’
    • ‘I practically screamed, pulling on the collar of his hideous orange uniform until we were nose to nose.’
    • ‘Tweed jackets are popular with the men, along with garish ties and socks, coloured shirts with white collars, coats with velvet lapels, yellow cords - all topped off with a flat cap or a trilby.’
    neckband, choker
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1
      short for clerical collar
    2. 1.2 A band of leather or other material put around the neck of a domestic animal, especially a dog or cat.
      • ‘You may want to purchase some special items such as a dog carrier, a collar and leash, and perhaps a pen when confinement is necessary.’
      • ‘All pets should have collars and tags with easily visible identification.’
      • ‘97 Use a harness on your dog when hiking instead of a collar and leash for less pull on his neck.’
      • ‘Choose from more than 30 collars and matching leashes.’
      • ‘Another thing animal lovers could possibly do during Deepavali is keep an eye out for lost companion animals with collars and tags.’
      • ‘Here's a tip: you should avoid using training collars on puppies under 16 weeks because their necks are still forming.’
      • ‘I rummaged through some boxes to find his leash and hooked it on his collar.’
      • ‘Her response was a nod of her head as she began towards the spot, taking a seat and clipping a leash to the collar of the pup before placing her once again upon the ground.’
      • ‘There are many types of training collars and leashes on the market.’
      • ‘The Greyhound bounced up and down happily as she clipped the leash to his chain collar.’
      • ‘She licked my face as I fastened the leash onto her collar.’
      • ‘It may be worth noting that many Scottish hill dogs never know the weight of a collar round their neck.’
      • ‘The basic training tools will be a collar, leash, chew toys and bones, gates, crates, and a bed.’
      • ‘Also introduce the puppy to the collar and leash, so he will be comfortable with these items.’
      • ‘The proposal would affect any cat not under an owner's direct control or without a collar.’
      • ‘Jordan leaped up onto the bed and waited patiently for Howard to fasten the leash onto his collar so they could go to the grounds on the exterior of the house.’
      • ‘Not a greyhound but a mongrel; a snarling, biting, clawing dog who has to wear a spike collar round its neck for its own protection.’
      • ‘I reported an injured cat which had somehow got its collar wrapped round its front leg.’
      • ‘Robb also said there was interest from police forces and search-and-rescue teams wanting to put the devices on the collars of dogs to transmit sound and pictures to their handlers.’
      • ‘Dogs should always wear a collar with identification tags.’
    3. 1.3 A colored marking resembling a collar around the neck of a bird or other animal.
      • ‘Testosterone-implanted males (with a control collar) were trialed against males with red, orange, blue, and control brown collars.’
      • ‘We fit 24 animals with radio collars to follow their movements and we also fly over and follow their tracks to take a census.’
      • ‘The neck collars have radio transmitters attached so that the birds can be tracked over a wide area of North Yorkshire and found wherever they land.’
      • ‘Then, if all went well, they would outfit the two-and-a-half-foot-long bird with a radio collar and transmitter.’
      • ‘One option was to fit animals with GPS collars, which get position fixes from satellites to monitor movements and activity patterns.’
    4. 1.4 A heavy rounded part of the harness worn by a draft animal, which rests at the base of its neck on the shoulders.
      • ‘The rigid collar and tandem harness allowed teams to pull with equal strength and greater efficiency.’
      • ‘But unless he can replace the stolen tack, collars and harness, he will be unable to take part.’
  • 2A restraining or connecting band, ring, or pipe in machinery.

    • ‘The two are mechanically joined by small circular collars that have been punched into the metal during the stamping process and set themselves firmly in the plastic during cold-pressing.’
    • ‘Diversion collars placed around the pipes, just below the sand surface, can be retrofitted if this begins to happen.’
    • ‘A stereolithographic method of fabricating the collars is disclosed.’
    • ‘Also look for a protective collar just below the coupling, which prevents the hose from kinking at the faucet.’
    • ‘The silicone end of the tubing is connected to the fitting located on the collar of the handpiece.’
    • ‘Currently I've aligned the shim with the frameset cut and have the collar at 180 degrees to the seat lug.’
    • ‘The concrete pipes and collars on the sandy bottom created a tangled mass of intestines that lay unconnected to anything.’
    • ‘So when the collar for new valve went round the pipe, there wasn't contact all the way round, due to a distinct lack of pipe.’
    ring, band, collet, sleeve, pipe, flange, rim, rib
    View synonyms
  • 3British A piece of meat rolled up and tied.

    1. 3.1 A cut of bacon taken from the neck of a pig.
      • ‘Living on a staple diet of belly pork, collar bacon, and beef dripping, her arteries should have been as choked as the M1 on a Friday evening.’
  • 4The part of a plant where the stem joins the roots.

    • ‘Field defined as being at a given stage when at least 50% of plants show collars.’
    • ‘A trench is dug, seedling bundles are placed side by side, the trench is refilled and soil is packed tightly around the roots up to the root collar.’
    • ‘Inserting the citronella later changes the scenario so the source of the spray traces back to the bark, not the collar.’
    • ‘For the measurements, stem was severed above the collar region and the roots sealed in the pressure chamber.’
    • ‘The clamp was located 10 cm from the collar, in most cases in the upper part of the third internode.’
    • ‘For example, V3 indicates the plant is in the vegetative stage and three leaf collars are visible.’
    • ‘Pack the soil around seedling, completely covering the root collar.’
    • ‘Second generation borers initially feed on leaf collars and sheaths, cutting off the flow of nutrients to the developing ear.’
    • ‘Planting too deeply will cause collar rot; planting too shallowly will expose the roots.’
    • ‘Cross sections collected at the root collar and at every meter were analyzed using standard dendrochronological techniques.’
    • ‘3 Saw off the stub just beyond the raised collar of bark where the branch attaches to the trunk.’
    • ‘Moreover, a healthy seedling's height will be roughly 50 times taller than its stem base or root collar.’
    • ‘Finally, make a third cut parallel to and just on the branch side of the of the stem collar to reduce the length of the stub as much as possible.’
    • ‘A proper pruning cut does not damage either the branch bark ridge or the branch collar.’
    • ‘Trees up to 15.0 cm diameter at the root collar were included in the sample.’
    • ‘This corrected for shifts in the root collar position relative to the soil surface due to minor erosion or deposition.’
    • ‘Heads emerge from leaf collars beginning in early July, and flowering commences within days after head emergence.’
    • ‘Probably the smaller angle deflections in second and third-level joints were due to the presence of collar tissues.’
    • ‘Remove limbs close to the trunk, but not so close that you cut into the collar of bark that circles the limb.’

verb

  • 1with object Put a collar on.

    ‘biologists who were collaring polar bears’
    • ‘‘It is much easier to get permission to run a line of cameras in the forest than to wade through the permitting process for capturing, tranquilizing and radio collaring,’ says Ullas Karanth.’
    • ‘This tigress was the third of seven tigers that we collared over the eight years of the Panna tiger ecology project.’
    • ‘Originally trapped and collared in a remote valley near the city of Brasov, Timis and her pack soon relocated themselves closer and began making nocturnal forays into town.’
    • ‘However, three of these caribou were never located after collaring, and we are uncertain whether they were present in our study area with functioning collars during the census.’
    • ‘The story's bear belongs to it and roams through it, and does not lumber out at the end collared and tagged.’
    • ‘When he first started radio collaring and tracking the animals six years ago, he thought they'd avoid busy city streets and stay within park boundaries - they didn't.’
    • ‘To track the fate of young antelope, Berger and her biologist husband, Joel Berger, radio collared 38 fawns last summer.’
    • ‘The day came, however, when young birds were ready to be moved from the captive breeding facility to the enclosure, and Sophie was caught, collared, and taken to a specially designed training cage.’
    • ‘All stoats that had been radio collared died, indicating a 100 % success with the poisoning method.’
    • ‘Initially 41 female elephants were darted, radio collared and injected with the contraceptive vaccine.’
    • ‘Although this meant one less bird collared, we cheered and clapped; it was the first time Wright had seen a juvenile fledge.’
    • ‘Both of us would have liked to have been able to have deer radio collared and then to have them hunted, and then the hunt stop at the end and allow the deer to get away.’
    • ‘The handling, collaring, and release were done by a Romanian wildlife technician named Marius Scurtu, a sturdy young man with an unassuming grin and a missing front tooth.’
    • ‘G096 was captured and collared in the northwest corner of Figure 2 in the area of the Ya-Ha-Tinder Ranch, and the collar was released in the southwest corner of the figure.’
  • 2informal with object Seize, grasp, or apprehend (someone)

    ‘police collared the culprit’
    • ‘They certainly didn't expect to wake one night to see Gardaí collaring two men in front of their new home.’
    • ‘When the man showed up at the passport office again, he was collared.’
    • ‘A crowd of around 100 onlookers gathered as cops collared the culprits and hauled them off to the police station.’
    • ‘He was collared by four stewards after slipping on the muddy surface and later arrested.’
    • ‘The feats of the Aboriginal trackers are the stuff of legend here in the Territory with numerous tales of wrong-doers being collared after being trailed through miles of featureless country.’
    • ‘The Canada goose was spotted on CCTV cameras and four security officers, used to collaring shoplifters, were sent to apprehend it.’
    • ‘He had recently collared a car thief who confessed to breaking into 100 cars in one night.’
    • ‘Rookie cops graduate from the police academy anxious to collar real criminals.’
    • ‘Several members of his gang were arrested and jailed, but the cops collared him only once.’
    • ‘And so the police collared the Beggarsdale Burglars in the act of robbing Tom of his prized quad bike - for the second time.’
    • ‘Glasgow's draconian attitude towards skateboarders (Paterson has spent a couple of nights in a police cell after being collared on his board) forces them into even more unsuccessful areas of urban architecture.’
    • ‘The directors were collared under the Company Law Enforcement Act 2001 which focused on insolvent companies after July 1, 2001.’
    • ‘His final words were ‘we've collared him,’ before the call ended.’
    • ‘On most of the major salmon rivers in Scotland today, including the Tay and the Tweed, the bailiffs will soon collar you if you mount a prawn rig on to your rod.’
    • ‘A month later he was collared at work and questioned by a Special Branch officer brandishing a printout of the message.’
    • ‘Dean Leavitt, the officer who collared the rosy-cheeked boys, declined to comment yesterday.’
    • ‘That's slim consolation, however, for the 50-odd banks the Friday Night Bank Robber knocked over before he was finally collared.’
    • ‘Crime-busting technology used by police to collar urban criminals is helping to catch wildlife thieves.’
    • ‘Nationally, more than people 13,000 people were collared by ANPR teams - an arrest rate nine times higher than the national average.’
    • ‘The unpopular Williams was collared and cuffed at his home on a Sunday afternoon, and spent the night in jail before a bail hearing could be scheduled Monday morning.’
    apprehend, arrest, catch, capture, seize
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Approach aggressively and talk to (someone who wishes to leave)
      ‘he collared a departing guest for some last words’
      • ‘He didn't just collar me and start telling me this, you understand.’
      • ‘Lost in a crowded WH Smiths, I collar a stray assistant and ask her where I can find some batteries.’
      • ‘One worried soul even collared me the day after my visit to find out whether my review would be ‘er, well, you know… okay’.’
      • ‘I was collared by the priest one day coming out of church, and my mum who was with me was only too happy to have me do it.’
      • ‘In Nottingham staff collared the local MP as he came into the studio for an interview to hand him a petition denouncing the Hutton report.’
      • ‘He collared me with a ‘Did you hear the one about the Irishman…?’’
      • ‘When last week I heard Morris would be in London for a few days I decided to collar her.’
      • ‘Intrepid reporter Claire Tomlinson collared Rovers' Turkish midfield star for a quick post-match chat after viewers had voted him their man-of-the-match.’
      • ‘I cannot picture the person who collared me, but still I hear their words ringing in my ears.’
      • ‘It was here that top aides from both campaigns collared journalists to try and spin their side's point of view.’
      • ‘A leading community figure opposed to the part pedestrianisation of Brentwood High Street has collared the county council supremo who will make the final decision.’
      • ‘After my rant last week about the downright overblown nature of Premiership football, a coltish newsroom colleague collared me.’
      • ‘As well as the online community, there will be teams of ‘pollsters’ sent out into the real world armed with web pad style devices to collar the non online folk too.’
      • ‘He was hoping to collar someone who would tell him what was up.’
      • ‘Rick left Edie's side immediately and collared David.’
      • ‘Brian Beard collared him after the game and there was a slightly serious element in his first question.’
      • ‘Eventually, after a search of the hospital's empty corridors, I collared a passing nurse and asked where everybody was.’
      • ‘He collared him crossing the playground one day.’
      accost, address, speak to, talk to, call to, shout to, hail, initiate a discussion with
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French colier, from Latin collare ‘band for the neck, collar’, from collum ‘neck’.

Pronunciation

collar

/ˈkälər//ˈkɑlər/