Definition of coliseum in English:

coliseum

(also colosseum)

noun

  • in names A large theater or stadium.

    ‘the Charlotte Coliseum’
    • ‘With its grid-pattern streets, one of France's best preserved colosseums, an amphitheatre and underground crypts much of this town has escaped the influence of the 20th century.’
    • ‘The Melbourne Cricket Ground, a contemporary colosseum, growls and echoes eerily as Waugh makes the long walk to the crease.’
    • ‘When the last of our troupe was recovered, we set off for Verona, home of Romeo's Juliet and one of the world's best surviving coliseums.’
    • ‘The two gladiators of Italian politics have entered the colosseum.’
    • ‘The colosseum opened in A.D.80 and hosted 100 spectacles a year. 50,000 available seats were divided into social classes.’
    • ‘Shot on location in Malta and Morocco, Scott even went so far as to build a full-scale replica of the Roman colosseum and a gladiator ‘training area’ - complete with ferocious wild cats.’
    • ‘A century ago, the Brunswick Street oval was a suburban colosseum.’
    • ‘Each of these is further divided by levels that cover multiple sub-areas, spanning diverse locations such as gladiatorial coliseums and temple ruins.’
    • ‘‘I wanted to get people's attention and fill up the coliseum,’ said Juan Mamani, 46, the president of the Titans and a wrestler himself.’
    • ‘But then those barbarians were taught Latin, were given roads and baths and coliseums, and became happy subjects.’
    • ‘Arunga Park is our outback colosseum, and it is here that boys with their toys gather to race to the death (of the vehicle), after months of rebuilding their stock cars from scratch.’
    • ‘With neon-lit mock Chinese fishing villages, a Romanesque coliseum and a man-made volcano spewing artificial lava, Macau believes it would, like Las Vegas, draw people from across the continent to spin the wheel of fortune.’
    • ‘That, however, does not mean this spanking, new state-of-the-art coliseum will be empty all that time. There may be a concert or some other athletic event booked in there while we're around.’
    • ‘The actors will also begin by standing at the bar, and the audience can move about to watch from all angles, recalling the theatre-in-the-round sightlines of a coliseum.’
    • ‘Then you go to America when they advertise fairly big, and you can go a coliseum, they'll hire a coliseum, and you'll have 80,000 people.’
    • ‘The architecture is stunning - the library, designed by Moshe Safdie, is modelled on a Roman colosseum.’
    • ‘There are abandoned temples, coliseums, amphitheaters, ruins of old, ruined Greek-Roman fortresses - there are even alleyways of destroyed ancient cities.’
    • ‘Knitting together and extending interior and exterior circulation paths on campus, it functions not only as colosseum, but also as agora - a place of informal social exchange.’
    • ‘On the day of competition, semi trailers rolled through the Anzac Oval gates, and in a matter of hours, television standard lighting was erected and an electronic scoreboard mounted, converting the paddock into a spectacular colosseum.’
    • ‘The Real Spartacus takes us inside the colosseums of ancient Rome and into the lives of its gladiators - considered the lowest forms of life at the time.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from medieval Latin, alteration of Latin colosseum (see Colosseum).

Pronunciation

coliseum

/ˌkäləˈsēəm//ˌkɑləˈsiəm/