Definition of cold-blooded in English:

cold-blooded

adjective

  • 1(of a kind of animal) having a body temperature varying with that of the environment; poikilothermic.

    • ‘Fish are cold-blooded and breathe underwater using gills; whales, on the other hand, maintain a warm and constant body temperature.’
    • ‘Most reptiles have three-chambered hearts, a design that makes them cold-blooded.’
    • ‘One species of bacterium sickens cattle, for example, while another attacks frogs, fishes, and other cold-blooded animals.’
    • ‘Like your butterflies, beneficial insects are cold-blooded and don't like cold, windy weather.’
    • ‘Butterflies are cold-blooded and bask in the sun to raise their body temperatures.’
    • ‘Still, bears are warm-blooded mammals and thus are more similar to humans than are cold-blooded reptiles like the alligators.’
    • ‘For example, one might think that skeletal growth rates would be higher for an endothermic animal than for an ectothermic, or cold-blooded, one.’
    • ‘But because many species are cold-blooded, some sharks eat only about 2 percent of their body weight each day.’
    • ‘Of cold-blooded creatures, lobsters and crayfish are particularly prized for their delicious ‘tail’ meat.’
    • ‘All cold-blooded animals, all warm-blooded animals and all plants have a place on this Earth.’
    • ‘Crocodiles are cold-blooded creatures, and they keep their temperature constant by basking in the sun and staying in the water at night.’
    • ‘There is a story about a frog, which, being a cold-blooded creature, adapts its temperature to its surroundings.’
    • ‘In genes of cold-blooded animals, plants, and unicellular organisms, these regularities are weaker and often not consistent.’
    • ‘When given a picture of a triceratops and told it was a dinosaur, the children correctly inferred that it belonged to the cold-blooded class of animals.’
    • ‘While most mammals and birds show signs of REM sleep, reptiles and other cold-blooded animals do not.’
    • ‘Reptiles have generally been described as sluggish, cold-blooded ectotherms.’
    • ‘Among the animals, cold-blooded forms like dinosaurs would have been affected more than the warm-blooded mammals.’
    • ‘Mammals have a much better chance of survival here, as they generate body heat internally and do not need to rely on heat from the sun like cold-blooded animals.’
    • ‘Large rocks or a stone wall make great basking spots for these cold-blooded insects.’
    • ‘When an alligator is resting, it breathes intermittently, taking one breath per minute, much like other cold-blooded reptiles.’
  • 2Without emotion or pity; deliberately cruel or callous.

    ‘a cold-blooded murder’
    • ‘He is also a cruel, cold-blooded, wicked, sadistic, brutal, ruthless and evil person.’
    • ‘The former managing director of a sheet metal firm died yesterday after he was gunned down by a hitman in a ‘savage, cold-blooded killing’ outside his home.’
    • ‘The cold-blooded murder galvanized the public AND the authorities.’
    • ‘This can be looked upon as cold-blooded and barbaric and not fit for today's modern society.’
    • ‘What a malicious, cold-blooded thing for a corporation to say.’
    • ‘But little children who are so filled with anger and fury that they commit cold-blooded murder are not the products of a healthy upbringing.’
    • ‘Chances are you had no idea one of the most cold-blooded, ruthless murderers in Canadian history was committing atrocities in your own back yard.’
    • ‘He had been accused as cold-blooded for such an emotionless image.’
    • ‘But however evil the crime and the criminal, it still does not justify cold-blooded murder by the state.’
    • ‘Such a cold-blooded and barbaric punishment degrades everyone involved in the murder.’
    • ‘They spoke of a kind, polite and popular son who would be incapable of cold-blooded murder.’
    • ‘The cold-blooded murder of two people, who according to reports were both disabled and could not escape their assassins, is a heinous crime.’
    • ‘You've made it very clear you believe a teenager could commit a cold-blooded murder.’
    • ‘What you hate most in your partner is that the person is ruthless, cold-blooded, and/or ironic.’
    • ‘This is not an action of the Resistance, but cold-blooded murder in the service of rotten political objectives.’
    • ‘He is putting Hitler to shame by his cold-blooded savagery.’
    • ‘It was a cold-blooded and brutal murder of people who were running away.’
    • ‘It was a cold-blooded brutal killing, carried out in a busy town-centre street at 3pm on a Thursday afternoon.’
    • ‘This was indicative of his cold-blooded and hard-hearted attitude towards Africans.’
    • ‘But still, for me, the death sentence is too cold-blooded, too unfeeling.’
    cruel, savage, brutal, callous, barbaric, barbarous, sadistic, inhuman, pitiless, merciless, ruthless, unforgiving, unpitying, inhumane, unfeeling, uncaring, heartless
    hard, severe, harsh, austere, cold, cold-hearted, unsympathetic, unemotional, unfriendly, uncharitable, hard-hearted, stony-hearted, with a heart of stone
    hard-boiled, hard-nosed, thick-skinned
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

cold-blooded

/ˌkōldˈblədid/