Definition of cocked hat in English:

cocked hat


  • 1A brimless triangular hat pointed at the front, back, and top.

    • ‘They dress in brocade costumes with cocked hats and swords, and they're known as The Immortals.’
    • ‘The officers also still had their cocked hats, which were kept for formal occasions and for proceeding ashore.’
    • ‘The cloth cap replaced the cocked hat for duty in 1841, displaying the current device by 1883 and the gold-embroidered visor in 1897.’
    • ‘Most of them sported at least one earring, but nobody except the captain wore a cocked hat.’
    • ‘When he got closer, he saw with a shock that two were dressed in 17th century clothes, with velvet coats, cocked hats, boots, pistols and swords.’
    • ‘It is at this point that the writers and director pull a series of surprise twists out of their cocked hats.’
    • ‘He is a local hero and part of the city's mythology: the gentleman robber in cape and cocked hat who on his famous horse Black Bess rode from London to York in a day.’
    1. 1.1historical A hat with a wide brim permanently turned up toward the crown, such as a tricorn.


  • knock something into a cocked hat

    • Utterly defeat or outdo something.

      • ‘It knocked the idea of the perfect guru into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘She wasn't religious but the way she lived her life would knock the morals of most religious people into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘He knocks all those criteria firmly into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘Commercially, the Beijing Olympics knocks the FIFA World Cup, which started on Friday, into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘Well, the local medical practice have just managed to knock that malarkey into a cocked hat, believe me.’
      • ‘Three or four of you playing against each other in the same room still knocks online play into a cocked hat any day of the week.’
      • ‘It is also one of the finest police comics of recent times, knocking the rest of the books in the genre into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘Several of you have written in saying that other countries can not only match England's tally, they can knock it into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘He has the skill and style to knock the typical Booker Prize-winner into a cocked hat.’
      • ‘Yes, there's nothing I like better than paying good money to see a load of plays that knock mine into a cocked hat.’


cocked hat

/ˌkäkt ˈhat/