Main definitions of cock in English

: cock1cock2

cock1

noun

  • 1A male bird, especially a rooster.

    • ‘Here, however, the contenders were not humans but birds: ordinary village cocks chosen for their natural belligerence.’
    • ‘It also means the balance is wrong with too many cocks fighting over an ever decreasing pool of hens.’
    • ‘We always awoke to the sound of a cock crowing or a bird chirping and when we looked outside, we saw nature in all of her morning glory!’
    • ‘A ‘moth-type’ display when the cock makes short fluttering flights above the hen has been described.’
    • ‘The cock was always conspicuous on any walk one took into the fens, with black cap and bib and white collar, flying up on to a sallow bush, uttering a wheezy jingle of alarm notes.’
    • ‘The cocks really were the most beautiful birds.’
    • ‘A fully-trained battle cock can be sold for more than $450 U.S. dollars, which equals a small fortune in the Philippines.’
    • ‘Most of them had just hatched when I got here and in the last 5 weeks they're becoming small hens and cocks.’
    • ‘During that time the cock is allowed to look at another hen.’
    • ‘This long-tailed cock was pale in color and beautiful in flight.’
    • ‘Display flights between rival cocks occupy much of the birds' time on the breeding grounds.’
    • ‘Apparently hens don't lay well in the presence of cocks, and won't incubate their own eggs.’
    • ‘Thoreau talks a little about how he misses the cock crowing, along with other domestic sounds.’
    • ‘Almost every household owns at least one cock raised for fighting.’
    • ‘Ancient scholars thought whenever a woman occupied such a position it would lead inevitably to disaster, as if a hen instead of a cock were to crow in the morning.’
    • ‘Male fighting gouramies are extremely belligerent toward each other and they are often bred to fight, as with the fighting cocks.’
    • ‘Every little lane among which I live had its hedgerow yellowhammers, the cocks perched on high on their songposts, on bushes or the telegraph wires.’
    • ‘Pheasants are handsome birds, especially the cocks, which are larger than the hens.’
    • ‘The crimson or brick-red parrot-like cocks may sing and chatter all moving like mice through branch and foliage.’
    • ‘The government approved a program to vaccinate free-range chickens, ducks, fighting cocks and tropical birds in a bid to fight off bird flu.’
    rooster, cockerel, male fowl, capon
    chanticleer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in combination] Used in names of birds, especially game birds, e.g., moorcock.
    2. 1.2British A male lobster, crab, or salmon.
      • ‘And a gigantic cock salmon of around 44 lb was also landed in November during hatchery broodstock collection.’
  • 2vulgar slang A penis.

  • 3British informal Nonsense.

    ‘that's all a lot of cock’
    • ‘Every single justification that is being given for destroying civil liberties is cock.’
    • ‘I'm not even going to bother to retaliate against this, because I know that he's just talking cock.’
    • ‘It should surprise you not at all that this is cock.’
    • ‘That's the way to make your staff feel valued - take away the tiniest benefit and justify it with what is obviously a load of cock and bull.’
    • ‘I've probably been biased by the show's being such absolute cock.’
  • 4A firing lever in a gun which can be raised to be released by the trigger.

  • 5A stopcock.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Tilt (something) in a particular direction.

    ‘she cocked her head slightly to one side’
    • ‘His head was cocked slightly to the right, and he was seeing her through squinted eyes.’
    • ‘Alyssa cocked her head sideways slightly referring to the glances they were getting.’
    • ‘As I look on, the first guy in the group, short and thin with a shaven head, comes to a stop, and he cocks his head sharply in my direction.’
    • ‘He frowned slightly and cocked his head as he looked at her.’
    • ‘The cat cocked its head slightly to the left, as though assessing the fairness of his words.’
    • ‘He cocked up a questioning eyebrow as he bent down lower to assess the noise.’
    • ‘She cocked one slick eyebrow at us with a small, tight smile.’
    • ‘She replied stubbornly and cocked her chin slightly in defiance.’
    • ‘A raven pecks at the dying salmon, then cocks its head and looks at us.’
    • ‘She jolted slightly in alarm, before leaning back and, cocking her chin to the side, surveyed him in perplexity.’
    • ‘‘You look like your mother,’ she said, cocking her head slightly.’
    • ‘She cocks her jaw, tilts her head, and taps a fisted hand on the chair's arm.’
    • ‘He cocks his head slightly at me, the corner of his lips curving upward.’
    • ‘Jem cocks his head, casting a suspicious gaze in his direction.’
    • ‘Micah asked the question, relaxing back in his seat and cocking his head in my direction.’
    • ‘‘You must be the mistress,’ he said quietly, cocking one arched eyebrow.’
    • ‘Cash raises her eyebrows and cocks her head at me.’
    • ‘The black-haired girl cocked her head and leaned forward a bit over the table.’
    • ‘Andrew's brow furrows, and he cocks his head slightly.’
    • ‘She smiled a very pleasant smile, cocking her head slightly.’
    tilt, tip, angle, lean, slope, bank, slant, incline, pitch, dip, cant, bevel, camber, heel, careen, put at an angle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Bend a (limb or joint) at an angle.
      ‘she listened, her little finger cocked as she held her coffee cup’
      • ‘A sea of hands goes up: the men point their index fingers and cock their thumbs, waving imaginary guns over their heads.’
      • ‘It took a superbly timed and perfectly executed tackle from Smith to deny Darby, who, leg cocked, looked ready to score from six yards.’
      • ‘In another photo, he is clenching a fist and has his arm cocked as if preparing to punch a hooded prisoner.’
      • ‘He then glared at Jake and growled, then charged him, his fist cocked back.’
      • ‘And there he was, long tail cocked, hooded with black, decorated with patches of deep and brilliant blue.’
      • ‘A straight extension of your arms, not cocked up or angled down, can cause strain and pain.’
      • ‘A soldier wheeled around the corner, arm cocked with a grenade.’
      • ‘He found himself standing before his unyielding foe, fist cocked, and suddenly shook his head.’
      • ‘The forelimbs are to the left, and are cocked back, elbows high, with the forepaws tucked under the chest.’
      • ‘Her wings are cocked in a funny angle as if they were broken recently.’
      • ‘We have also seen her with her hand cocked on her hips and her pelvis thrust forward and have both wondered if she's not really a midget.’
      • ‘It was streaming blood and cocked at an angle that told everyone watching it was broken.’
      • ‘We now had each other in mutual strangle holds, right arms cocked to punch at full force.’
      • ‘She lay sprawled on the ground below, one leg cocked beneath her at a grotesque angle.’
      • ‘In two steps, she was upon it, springing onto its back, hand cocked to deliver a blow to the back of its skull.’
      • ‘These hopes were soon dashed as he cocked one ham-sized fist back, paused and then unloaded into my right shoulder.’
      • ‘She hobbles out of the curtain with a murderous look on her face and her fist cocked and ready to throw another punch.’
      • ‘As she launched herself forward with one arm cocked back as a feint, he threw a forceful punch releasing a wave of concussive force.’
      • ‘He bowed before the black sapphire throne on which his master sprawled, his one leg cocked over the armrest, totally relaxed.’
      • ‘She stood with hip cocked and hands crossed over her chest.’
      bend, flex, crook, angle, curve, kink
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of a male dog) lift (a back leg) in order to urinate.
      • ‘His unluckiest dog cocked his leg at a lamp post - and was electrocuted.’
      • ‘Council bosses are spending £75,000 to discover the effects of dogs cocking their legs against lamp posts.’
      • ‘As usual, one charming little dog cocked its leg on my tackle bag.’
      • ‘Junior turned around as the dog was cocking his leg.’
      • ‘One piece featured a dog cocking his leg against an orange tree.’
      • ‘Postal workers are so fed up with dogs cocking their legs on the town's main postbox that the Royal Mail is threatening to remove it.’
      lift, raise, lift up, hold up
      View synonyms
  • 2Raise the cock of (a gun) in order to make it ready for firing.

    • ‘All around, weapons were readied, pistols were drawn, and rifles were cocked.’
    • ‘He cocked it and aimed directly at Vincent, who was caught in his own battle with Greg.’
    • ‘Chris was just standing up from his seat in front of the computer, cocking a machine gun and inspecting it closely.’
    • ‘‘We don't make deals with the enemy,’ he snarled cocking the gun making it ready to fire.’
    • ‘Grinning, Vincent raised his eyebrow, cocking the revolver.’
    • ‘When you're loading to shoot immediately you can simply position the empty chamber under the firing pin and cock the gun in a normal manner.’
    • ‘The hammer must now be cocked or lowered by hand with a single action pistol, and that gets dangerous.’
    • ‘The sound of fifty plus guns being cocked ready to fire echoed throughout the enclosed hangar.’
    • ‘Two goons cocked their guns ready to fire at me, still kneeling on the ground, when he lifted a finger.’
    • ‘She cocked the hand gun and scurried downstairs.’
    • ‘The young man spun around, only to face a large group of mounted police, their pistols cocked and ready.’
    • ‘With a 1911, the gun can be cocked and ready to fire with the safety on, so again there is no problem.’
    • ‘The kitchen door flew open, and one of the men backed into the hall, his gun cocked and ready.’
    • ‘At some stage you cocked that gun so that it was ready to fire.’
    • ‘I pointed the pistol at the shooter, but the gun wasn't cocked.’
    • ‘As quietly as he could he headed up the stairs, revolver cocked and ready in his hand.’
    • ‘He picked up the fool's gun and cocked it in the direction of the children.’
    • ‘He stepped into view and the sound of his gun being cocked brought the guards around suddenly, rifles ready.’
    • ‘Soldiers, with guns cocked and ready, check your ID and query the purpose of your visit.’
    • ‘When the lever is on ‘safe,’ the hammer cannot be cocked by the trigger, by hand, or by pulling back the slide.’

Phrases

  • at full cock

    • (of a gun) with the cock lifted to the position at which the trigger will act.

      • ‘He was making a vigilant circumspection of the forest, his shotgun held in both hands and at full cock, his finger upon the trigger.’
      • ‘In most of its usage, that term denotes a part that holds the hammer at full cock until the trigger moves it to the release point.’
      • ‘You can fire one barrel with the other at full cock without fear of accidentally firing the other barrel.’
      • ‘The hammer should be returned to the half-cock safety position when the action is closed rather than leaving it at full cock.’
      • ‘He and others carried their guns with a cartridge chambered, hammer at full cock and thumb safety engaged.’
  • cock one's ear

    • 1(of a dog) raise its ears to an erect position.

      • ‘He tilted his head and cocked his foxlike ears at an angle that mirrored the devilish sparkle in his brown eyes.’
      • ‘He cocked his ears and tilted his head to study the other with cold eyes.’
      1. 1.1(of a person) listen attentively to or for something.
        • ‘He struck his six-iron well enough and cocked his ear to pick up the hum of appreciation at the other end.’
        • ‘She stiffened and cocked her ear, hoping to hear something.’
        • ‘Because of the confidential tone that my voice had taken, every ear in the room was cocked in our direction.’
        • ‘Every so often, if you tilt your head, cock your ear, and concentrate, you'll be able to hear the low rumble of political organisation coming out of the otherwise-ordinary environment that surrounds you.’
        • ‘She suddenly stopped speaking, and cocked her ear to listen to something.’
        • ‘There, he said, cocking his ear, don't you hear someone calling you?’
        • ‘Jennifer breathed, cocking her ear to the sound of the blasts.’
        • ‘Wesley heard a sound and cocked his ear in the direction.’
        • ‘Aaron cocked his ear to one side as he usually did when trying to hear something and said, ‘Sounds like the shed door.’’
        • ‘She hefted the large mass of weaponry with great difficulty, and then cocked her ear.’
  • cock one's eye (or eyebrow)

    • Glance in a quizzical or knowing manner with a raised eyebrow.

      • ‘I like the way that she never stops distrusting Sam and even cocks her eye irritatedly at him when they are forced to impersonate a married couple.’
      • ‘Brian cocked his eye, a puzzled look crossing his face.’
      • ‘He looks straight into the camera, cocks his eye and speaks.’
      • ‘The director suggests that he should cock his eye in a way that is funnier than he imagined, judging from his enthusiastic response.’
      • ‘He wasn't going to wear three-piece suits, and stay absolutely sober 24 hours a day, and never cock his eye when a good-looking woman went past.’
  • cock of the walk

    • Someone who dominates others within a group.

      • ‘Once you were the office favorite, the cock of the walk, but jealousy and backstabbing rivalries conspired to drag you down.’
      • ‘He went on, ‘and at the center of that you have a charismatic cock of the walk.’’
      • ‘She took over as the cock of the walk in British athletics.’
      • ‘‘Craig thinks he's the cock of the walk,’ she said.’
      • ‘Now, he claims, everything has changed, ‘The lame duck is now cock of the walk.’’
      • ‘One day you are cock of the walk and the next you are a feather duster.’
      • ‘It won't necessarily make him cock of the walk, however.’
      • ‘Just seven months ago, the guys at Powerline were cock of the walk.’
      • ‘He will then spend the weekend strutting around like the cock of the walk.’
      • ‘In the days when he was cock of the walk as a wing back, he was a big game player.’
  • cock a snook

Origin

Old English cocc, from medieval Latin coccus; reinforced in Middle English by Old French coq.

Pronunciation

cock

/käk/

Main definitions of cock in English

: cock1cock2

cock2

noun

dated
  • A small pile of hay, straw, or other material, with vertical sides and a rounded top.

    • ‘The cocks of hay that had stood in the fields for some weeks were checked regularly by dad to make sure that they did not ‘heat’.’
    • ‘We slalomed around cocks of hay, stopped to drink from wooden troughs and waved happily at the other cyclists cruising along the lakeside.’
    • ‘Country people will recall the mini-cyclones lifting cocks of hay into the air and carrying them for a distance before dropping them back to ground again.’
    • ‘He developed the making of a neat cock of hay to a fine art.’
    • ‘He took a great pride in those cocks of hay, especially during wet summers when they were the only ones to be seen for miles around.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Shape (hay, straw, or other material) into a pile with vertical sides and a rounded top.

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps of Scandinavian origin and related to Norwegian kok heap, lump Danish kok haycock and Swedish koka clod.

Pronunciation

cock

/käk/