Definition of cocaine in English:

cocaine

noun

  • An addictive drug derived from coca or prepared synthetically, used as an illegal stimulant and sometimes medicinally as a local anesthetic.

    coke
    • ‘She found a job and a flat but fell into drug use, taking cocaine and ecstasy, and her life began to fall apart.’
    • ‘A broken leg kept him out for a year and he became a nightclub regular, cocaine his usual drug of choice.’
    • ‘Any drug, from tobacco and tea to cocaine and heroin, can be used responsibly if proper care is taken.’
    • ‘Illegal drugs such as marijuana or cocaine may affect fertility, so don't use them.’
    • ‘Bishop, who took heroin and cocaine in the days before the burglary, broke into the storage house.’
    • ‘There they found traces of four banned substances, including heroin and cocaine.’
    • ‘This would have a bad effect on society, as we don't want increased use of cocaine and heroin!’
    • ‘When I was sixteen I went to clubs and took ecstasy, cocaine or any other drugs connected to that scene.’
    • ‘At this point, back in the early half of the Eighties, cocaine was a recreational drug.’
    • ‘Sigmund Freud experimented with this and other uses of cocaine and took the drug himself for many years.’
    • ‘A man stopped by police on patrol in a local park was found to have cocaine and heroin on him.’
    • ‘People say it is the start of the slippery slope to harder things like cocaine and heroin.’
    • ‘Senior police officers have been rapped for not keeping a close eye on batches of seized cocaine and heroin.’
    • ‘During some of these incidents he admitted to being high on heroin and cocaine.’
    • ‘Just one night I was in this club and this guy asked me if I wanted some cocaine, and I took a little bit.’
    • ‘Tests showed she suffered a heart attack after taking heroin, morphine and cocaine.’
    • ‘At first cocaine was used only as a stimulant, but it soon became, and still is, widely abused.’
    • ‘Police found cocaine and cannabis when they stopped a man in the street, a court has heard.’
    • ‘All this time would be much better used in trying to catch those selling heroin or cocaine, drugs which kill.’
    • ‘This is a pathetic argument, as everybody knows drugs like heroin and cocaine destroy lives.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from coca + -ine.

Pronunciation:

cocaine

/kōˈkān//ˈkōˌkān/