Main definitions of cobble in English

: cobble1cobble2

cobble1

noun

usually cobbles
  • 1A cobblestone.

    • ‘Pulling herself painfully up, she wobbled shakily on the cobbles, catching the icy metal of the lamp-post next to her to steady herself.’
    • ‘I drag myself over the grey cobbles to the door, my heart in my ears, my feet stumbling, the grey weather scowling at me.’
    • ‘The window in the study shattered as a piece of cobble flew into to it.’
    • ‘In total there are 148 square metres of accommodation, while outside, the back garden is laid in patio and cobble.’
    • ‘Although his clothes were clean and cared-for, they were also clearly second-hand and shabby, and his long feet were bare on the cobbles of the street.’
    • ‘If a traveler had been passing through, they would not have noticed that the cobbles in the square were uneven and had long since been denied attention.’
    • ‘The white cobbles burnt the soles of her feet even through her tough slippers.’
    • ‘‘You came,’ she said as her friend pulled her suitcases out onto the cobbles.’
    • ‘The cobbles were cool on my feet - I had not even put on sandals for fear of being heard creeping across the marble floor of my home.’
    • ‘Among the items found were pieces of 12th century pottery, 12th or 14th century cobble and part of a hearth.’
    • ‘Their claws clicked on the cobbles as they approached the corner.’
    • ‘I collapse the antenna and walk back along the cobbles, thinking again of the man who overwintered in this area.’
    • ‘Stepping out onto the cobbles in front of the steps, the men found themselves at the center of a loose circle of guardsman.’
    • ‘The drunkard still lay unconscious on the cobbles.’
    • ‘The noise of his feet on the cobbles woke the dogs of the town, who barked as if they meant to break their chains.’
    • ‘In the middle of the roadway beneath the window, the Vizier's ivory rose lay pristine on the muddy cobbles.’
    • ‘The streets shifted with no apparent rhyme or reason from flagstone to cobbles to brick and back again.’
    • ‘His head pounded with each pace and his mouth felt dry and rough, like the dusty cobbles of the street.’
    • ‘I complete it by slowly walking down the steps on the other side of the bridge, and turn on the polished cobbles of the old street.’
    • ‘Running her hand down along the side, she crouched in the shadows and reached to the bottom, where the stair met the well-worn cobbles.’
    1. 1.1cobblesBritish Coal in lumps the size of cobblestones.
      • ‘You make the big decision to finish and then they keep moving the dates to make sure they get every last cobble of coal.’
      • ‘I found I could relate this cobble to the very last year that the mine was being mined.’
      • ‘Cobbles of coal may be seen in the water showing the location of outcropping seams.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from cob + -le.

Pronunciation

cobble

/ˈkɑbəl//ˈkäbəl/

Main definitions of cobble in English

: cobble1cobble2

cobble2

verb

[with object]
  • 1cobble something togetherRoughly assemble or put together something from available parts or elements.

    ‘the mayor cobbled together a budget’
    • ‘In the past, we thought of joint operations as cobbling together a tactically - or even an operationally - effective force from various service components.’
    • ‘Our first articles were cobbled together in record time.’
    • ‘A light tubular chassis with an inline 8 cylinder engine was made by cobbling a couple of sports engines together.’
    • ‘Cobbling together good skills that can be applied to every situation will make you a force to be reckoned with at the table at all times.’
    • ‘That's not stopping companies from cobbling together technologies.’
    • ‘We worked it out by cobbling together some of the instructions for the earlier versions and all went smoothly enough.’
    • ‘Plato had a particular reason for cobbling together the story.’
    • ‘It's been done before, usually by cobbling together footage in a canny way.’
    • ‘Most deals were cobbled together at the last minute.’
    • ‘They're still cobbling together old solutions for single machines and trying to make them look new.’
    • ‘Those first armies had been cobbled together and paid on a hand-to-mouth basis.’
    • ‘Anyway, hopefully between us we will be able to cobble something together.’
    • ‘With the help of various agents we managed to cobble something together.’
    • ‘The first thing I did was cobble together a working computer so they could get started on building a database for their finds.’
    • ‘Even if an agreement is cobbled together it will not please everyone.’
    • ‘Now, prototypes can be cobbled together in weeks from off-the-shelf components.’
    • ‘He and the other dazed workers who converged on the center soon joined the priest in cobbling together an emergency response system.’
    • ‘In fact, he's doing fine, cobbling together an income by ‘teaching some skiing seminars, selling some photos, and doing some freelance designing.’’
    • ‘The best way to improve their economic prospects is not through the work-support programs that states are desperately cobbling together to help them cope.’
    • ‘A large number of scholars, writers and activists have been quietly cobbling together a clear, confident and credible set of policy alternatives.’
    prepare hastily, prepare roughly, make hastily, make roughly, put together hastily, put together roughly, scribble, improvise, devise, contrive, rig, rig up, patch together, jerry-build
    View synonyms
  • 2dated Repair (shoes).

    • ‘Modern economies rely on the division of labor, such that one needn't bake bread, smith tools and cobble shoes in a day's work.’

Origin

Late 15th century: back-formation from cobbler.

Pronunciation

cobble

/ˈkäbəl//ˈkɑbəl/