Definition of coati in English:

coati

noun

  • A raccoonlike animal found mainly in Central and South America, with a long, flexible snout and a ringed tail.

    Also called coatimundi
    • ‘Meanwhile, a litter of up to 20 South American coatis can be seen out and about playing every day as they tuck into insects, eggs and fruit.’
    • ‘While the plants in the center help most animals in the graph, they have a special relation to the tree-dwelling mammals in the set: spider monkeys, howler monkeys, and coatis.’
    • ‘Back near the boiling mud we came upon a coati crossing the trail - there was a noise in the bush and soon there were more of them, all rushing away from the source of a hooting in the forest over on the right.’
    • ‘A raccoon-like coati scurried across the road and into the adjacent woodland, just as one did thirty years before.’
    • ‘We blundered on for hours, passing through the cattle gates of anonymous ranches, scattering cows, coatis, and caimans, before we got stuck.’
    • ‘Many eggs are destroyed by this unfortunate timing, and predators (mainly coyotes, raccoons, opossums and coatis in Costa Rica) account for further losses.’
    • ‘We already have problems with grey squirrels, now coatis and terrapins are also a problem.’
    • ‘The reserve provides a home to 1,800 black howler monkeys as well as 250 species of birds, deer, coatis, anteaters, peccaries, and iguana.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Spanish and Portuguese, from Tupi kua'ti, from cua belt + tim nose.

Pronunciation:

coati

/kōˈädē/