Definition of coal in English:

coal

noun

  • 1A combustible black or dark brown rock consisting mainly of carbonized plant matter, found mainly in underground deposits and widely used as fuel.

    as modifier ‘a coal fire’
    • ‘Surface mining began in the United States in the late eighteenth century, when farmers and others dug coal from exposed coal seams on hillsides and stream banks.’
    • ‘And then there is the mystery of coal prices going up in global markets.’
    • ‘A monument to mark Ingleton's coal mining heritage was officially unveiled this week.’
    • ‘This increase was in line with a growing demand for coal, especially as coal was used for fuel for steam vessels.’
    • ‘Notice that the lower coal seam has vertical trees jutting out of it.’
    • ‘How many people burn coal on open fires?’
    • ‘Other members of the committee wanted to build nothing more than a horse-drawn railway to bring cheap coal to York.’
    • ‘Burning brown coal, using new technologies, is effective and environmentally acceptable.’
    • ‘Wind energy simply cannot employ as many people as the coal industry currently does.’
    • ‘New owners exploited coal reserves more actively and sought markets within and beyond their localities.’
    • ‘I would often dream of steering that train or even shovelling coal into its boilers.’
    • ‘Thus, an industrially valuable coal seam requires special conditions to accumulate.’
    • ‘Coal bed methane is a type of natural gas found in underground coal seams.’
    • ‘Every now and then the two firemen would shovel coal in to the boilers.’
    • ‘I went to a bad state school in a coal mining town in Australia.’
    • ‘Nine coal miners have been rescued following more than three days trapped underground.’
    • ‘China has introduced a tax on high-sulphur coals, and in Beijing established 40 ‘coal-free zones’.’
    • ‘The plant burns lignite coal from the Maritsa Iztok mining complex and produces a large amount of sulphur dioxide.’
    • ‘Bituminous coal is found in seams of varying thicknesses.’
    • ‘The breathing of coal and rock dust causes black lung, the common name given to the lung diseases pneumoconiosis and silicosis.’
    • ‘And it offers tax credits for alternative fuels, including wind power and clean coal.’
    1. 1.1 A red-hot piece of coal or other material in a fire.
      ‘the glowing coals’
      • ‘Finally, his neck stiff from looking up, the Professor returned to studying the glowing coals of the fire.’
      • ‘The fire was never lit in time, the chicken was black on the outside and raw on the inside, and the rain stayed away until just before the first prawn was thrown on the coals.’
      • ‘If you are going to barbecue the beef, allow about 40 minutes for the coals to reach the right temperature.’
      • ‘Why is it possible for bare feet to touch red-hot coals without getting burned?’
      • ‘Place the skewers over medium-hot coals (or on a hot griddle, indoors) and cook for about three to four minutes, turning regularly.’
      • ‘Red-hot coals provide uniform heat for quite some time and can be easily rekindled whenever needed.’
      • ‘When the sun sinks over the western horizon, he claimed, these slopes glow fiery crimson like the coals of a roaring furnace.’
      • ‘Faces of demons were cut into the vegetables, then a glowing coal was placed inside.’
      • ‘Walking on hot coals is not easy and Kashmiri coals are among the hottest.’
      • ‘Alternatively, mackerel or cod steaks can be wrapped in tinfoil with cumin and lime juice and given a quick blast on the coals.’
      • ‘A dying fire burned nearby, its coals still glowing crimson.’
      • ‘The coals should be glowing hot; the griddle should be at a medium-high heat.’
      • ‘If barbecuing, allow 40 minutes for the coals to heat up.’
      • ‘Fifteen years ago I would have walked there over hot coals for the gig.’
      • ‘Mike lit the barbecue on a low gas setting, allowed the coals to heat up and then cooked the ribs slowly.’
      • ‘Hundreds looked on in amazement as more than 50 people defied their instincts and walked barefoot over hot coals.’
      • ‘Brush with a little olive oil and barbecue over medium hot coals for about four minutes on each side until well-browned, firm and hot all the way through.’
      • ‘After crossing the smoking bed of glowing coals, the fire walkers put their feet into a small side pit filled with milk.’
      • ‘Throw some fresh thyme into the coals and proceed to cook the fish, turning periodically, or between sips of your chosen tipple.’
      • ‘She saw the burning hot coals and wondered what torture they were going to submit her to.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Provide with a supply of coal.

    ‘the coaling and watering of the engine’
    • ‘The United States wanted Japan to provide coaling stations for American ships in the new age of steamships.’
    • ‘Each time it merely turned an engine around or coaled and watered it, such as when a yard engine came in for a crew change, the roundhouse was credited with a half-dispatch.’
    • ‘It was shown in 1960 at Lambton shop track, with contractor's employee about to coal her up.’
    • ‘After coupling to the coach, No. 823 was coaled manually and then had to reverse down the shed road to be oiled and greased for the return journey.’
    • ‘Details range from swimming instruction for boy seaman recruits at HMS Ganges to how Naval vessels were coaled.’
    • ‘The system of 27 Pyle-O-Lite floodlights were to be located on 3-120 foot galvanized steel towers as well as on top of both West Toronto and Lambton coaling plants.’
    • ‘Likewise coal is often listed as a cargo as ships tried to deliver it to coaling stations all over the empire.’
    • ‘It has been variously a careening (hull-cleaning) bay, a pirate haven, a Danish freeport, slave-market, a gun-running centre, steamship coaling station, US Naval Base and latterly a major cruise ship port.’

Phrases

  • coals to Newcastle

    • Something brought or sent to a place where it is already plentiful.

      • ‘It takes a certain kind of cheek for a Russian opera company to bring Carmen to Paris - the operatic equivalent of coals to Newcastle.’
      • ‘It smacks of taking coals to Newcastle but the Forestry Commission hopes it is on to a money spinner by sending wood to Scandinavia.’
      • ‘Thanks to the poor harvest in France (it was just too hot over there) he actually exported some Wight garlic to a French company - truly an example of selling coals to Newcastle.’
      • ‘Although it might sound a bit like selling coals to Newcastle, exporting daffodils to Holland is exactly what bulb growers in Britain are now doing.’
      • ‘Carrying beer to Bierfest was on a par with carrying coals to Newcastle or water to the Thames.’
  • rake (or haul) someone over the coals

    • Reprimand someone severely.

      • ‘Yesterday the Assistant Speaker spent a lot of time in the House hauling me over the coals for apparently using unparliamentary language.’
      • ‘If a player steps out of line then he gets hauled over the coals by the FA.’
      • ‘The bank was hauled over the coals last year for mortgage redemption penalties which left homeowners facing bills of tens of thousands of pounds.’
      • ‘We got hauled over the coals by management for it - even though all the evidence showed us to be in the right.’
      • ‘Having been hauled over the coals by both the media and the Treasury Select Committee for its disastrous investment policy, he is now determined to rebuild the firm's reputation.’
      • ‘I would hope Bertie has hauled him over the coals and, if he hasn't, it shouldn't be too late even now for him to do so.’

Origin

Old English col (in the senses ‘glowing ember’ and ‘charred remnant’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch kool and German Kohle. The sense ‘combustible mineral used as fuel’ dates from Middle English.

Pronunciation

coal

/koʊl//kōl/