Definition of coadjutor in English:

coadjutor

noun

  • A bishop appointed to assist a diocesan bishop, and often also designated as his successor.

    • ‘Vera Lopez was considered a conservative when the pope named him bishop coadjutor in 1995, but he too became an outspoken advocate of the rights of the indigenous peasants of Chiapas.’
    • ‘It's more than 80 years since a coadjutor archbishop succeeded to the See of Dublin.’
    • ‘Connell asked Rome in May 2002 to appoint a coadjutor archbishop with the right of succession, but candidates weren't easy to find.’
    • ‘The diocese feels a sense of gratitude for the gentle leadership which Bishop Laurence Ryan has given, first as coadjutor to Bishop Patrick Lennon and since late 1987 as bishop of the diocese.’
    • ‘In a letter to the 200 priests of his diocese announcing his application to the Pope for a coadjutor, Bishop Konstant tells them: ‘I have been aware that while I am able to continue my work in the diocese I do need some help.’’
    • ‘Catholic tradition holds that it is an aberration for a diocese to have more than one bishop, although a coadjutor is allowed for a bishop in need because of health or age.’
    • ‘Before Ruiz retired in 2000, the Vatican placed a bishop coadjutor in his diocese.’
    • ‘Appointed coadjutor bishop of New York in 1837, he was consecrated the following year.’
    • ‘Her life was written by Thomas de Cantimpre, the coadjutor of the Bishop of Cambrai.’
    • ‘The coadjutor pulled Michael to the side to confer with him.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin coadjutor, from co- (from Latin cum ‘together with’) + adjutor ‘assistant’ (from adjuvare ‘to help’).

Pronunciation