Main definitions of coach in English

: coach1coach2

coach1

noun

  • 1A horse-drawn carriage, especially a closed one.

    • ‘Think of Cinderella's coach turning into a pumpkin, and the Grimms' tale of Hansel and Gretel about to be devoured by a witch.’
    • ‘Occasionally a big coach drawn by four horses would come up the drive and pass around by me, this made me very happy.’
    • ‘We reckon the rent on the coach house would be €700 a week.’
    • ‘In the 1670's, the city's Corporation received complaints about the traffic congestion caused by hackney coaches.’
    • ‘I was once in the crowd that greeted him when he drew up in a horse-drawn coach.’
    • ‘Me. Who set all of the horses free when the coach house caught fire?’
    • ‘A large coach house situated to the rear of the house provides excellent opportunities.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coaches heading for Scotland have been replaced by commuters on the A1, which is right on the doorstep.’
    • ‘At the turn of the 20th century, he became landlord of the nearby Coach and Horses and ran a livery business from there with horse-drawn coaches and traps for hire.’
    • ‘But the six horses pulling the coach continued to accelerate rapidly, and the boy could not keep up for long.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful sight to see because many of the guests arrived in horse-drawn coaches and carriages.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coach rides throughout town are also a popular activity for tourists.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coaches for hire in nineteenth-century Paris were also painted yellow.’
    • ‘Memorable events include the angel parade at the city hall and tours by horse-drawn coaches.’
    • ‘Here the traffic consisted not of coaches and carriages but of wagons and hand-carts.’
    • ‘The horse-drawn coaches were rough and uncomfortable transport.’
    horse-drawn carriage, trap, hackney, hansom, gig, landau, brougham, cab
    View synonyms
  • 2A railroad car.

    • ‘The boy stands by the coach of the train, his body taut as a spring.’
    • ‘The slip coach would have been controlled by a guard sitting in his driving compartment, alert to separate the coach from its parent train at the right moment, then brake it to a halt at the station.’
    • ‘As the coach in question was to be added to the train for the return journey, No. 823 could not simply shunt it away down the shed road.’
    • ‘Still, we were able to find two seats together in a coach near the center of the train.’
    • ‘One does not sit in a first-class coach if the train ticket is for a second-class seat.’
    • ‘After Skip met us in our coach, the five of us all went to the dining car for dinner.’
    • ‘As many as 59 people were killed, seven of them unidentified, in the fire in the sleeper coach of the train.’
    • ‘A coach on that train mysteriously caught fire near the station and snuffed out 38 lives.’
    • ‘Two of the added displays that the museum will now have room to exhibit are velvet cushion chairs from an early railroad coach and a large rail cutting saw.’
    • ‘My coach in the train rolls to a stop next to whole banks of seats and benches on the platform, laid out neatly as if in an auditorium.’
    • ‘The diagram shows to the left the rear of the last coach of the main train, and to the right the front of the Slip-Coach itself.’
    carriage, wagon, compartment, van, pullman
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1North American Economy class seating in an aircraft or train.
      ‘a transatlantic flight in coach isn't the most pleasant experience’
      ‘the cheapest coach-class fare’
      • ‘The airline will still serve free beverages in coach class, according to The Associated Press.’
      • ‘They sat down together in the front of coach class.’
      • ‘There were three seats on each side of the plane in coach.’
      • ‘This trip was in the planning stages for a long time. I wanted to make the trip alone in coach class.’
      • ‘Sale fares are available daily for Envoy class, but only between Monday and Thursday for coach class.’
      • ‘It is the only major carrier to continue offering free meals in coach class on all flights after other airlines suspended meal service or started selling snacks as a way to cut costs.’
      • ‘Our train consists of six coach class cars, a cafe car, and one business class car.’
      • ‘I was not sure if they ever got to seat any coach passengers who wanted dinner in the diner.’
      • ‘I think Frank and I are going to go exploring a bit and try to find Molly in coach.’
      • ‘There's a reason those economy seats are uncomfortable: If it seems like the seat cushions in coach class are worn out, it's not your imagination.’
      • ‘If spacious first class is too pricey, request the first row of coach class.’
      • ‘Under the latter option, the eight coupons include six coach class and two business class tickets.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, airline policies usually do not mandate hourly beverage service in coach class.’
      • ‘He offered us a seat in coach with a refund of our sleeping car fee, but we were not interested in that.’
      • ‘All of Southwest's seats are coach, and seating is first-come, first-serve.’
      • ‘With the new configuration, the aircraft will have 24 seats in first class and 192 in coach.’
      • ‘On bigger jets, that can mean as few as two attendants in coach class trying to sell food to more than 100 passengers.’
      • ‘Then the airlines turn around and sell the coach seat I just vacated to another passenger.’
  • 3A bus, especially one that is comfortably equipped and used for longer journeys.

    • ‘I went on a coach trip years ago and had a great time, so I knew the idea could work.’
    • ‘On the return journey the coach driver took the group through the city of Luxembourg, a first visit for many.’
    • ‘Instead, we booked a nine-hour coach journey into Dallas, Texas, where we would stay for a couple of days, before moving down to Austin.’
    • ‘A local woman's car was in collision with the front of the coach and she was trapped.’
    • ‘The new ruling has infuriated coach drivers, who now have nowhere to park.’
    • ‘They travel to Philadelphia for a plane to Boston where they will get on a coach for the four-hour journey to the resort.’
    • ‘If the system works it could lead to early warning systems being installed in coaches, lorries and cars.’
    • ‘A coach load of friends from Manchester is expected to travel south for the funeral.’
    • ‘Oh, and some foolish coach driver forgot 46 passengers on the Terminal yesterday.’
    • ‘Another member of the congregation is believed to have been on the coach trip.’
    • ‘The emerging dawn had been a wonderful sight and the traffic free roads and ease with which we ambled along in our luxury coach made the journey really pleasant.’
    • ‘In Mr Smith's letter he pointed out that many well-known coach tour operators were passing through Sligo without stopping.’
    • ‘But the six-month trip was cruelly cut short when thieves broke into a tour coach and stole all her possessions - forcing her to return home.’
    • ‘We will have to hire a huge number of coaches to replace the services on the closed stretch of track.’
    • ‘I think the only time I've ever been to Birmingham was on an evening coach journey for a school theatre trip, probably twenty years ago.’
    • ‘Chester and York attract coach loads of visitors with their Roman walls and artefacts.’
    • ‘She was allowed to sit at the front on the coach journey home, on her own, with the rest of the class huddled together in the back three rows.’
    • ‘There are fewer bookings from coach tour operators, particularly from the US.’
    • ‘The coach trip to the Lake district and Scotland is now completely booked out.’
    • ‘After checking into our hotel in Edinburgh we had a coach journey to the wedding that was going to take us nearly two hours.’
    bus, minibus, van
    View synonyms

verb

  • no object , with adverbial of direction Travel by coach.

    ‘they coached to Claude's dwelling’

adverb

North American
  • In economy class accommodations in an aircraft or train.

    ‘flying coach’
    • ‘Yoli and I were traveling coach to Chicago since the trip would be only ten hours.’
    • ‘We normally ride coach and bring along some extra padding to make the seats more comfortable.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in coach (sense 3 of the noun)): from French coche, from Hungarian kocsi (szekér) ‘(wagon) from Kocs’, a town in Hungary.

Pronunciation

coach

/kōCH//koʊtʃ/

Main definitions of coach in English

: coach1coach2

coach2

noun

  • 1An athletic instructor or trainer.

    • ‘We worked in a recreational center as coaches, teaching little kids how to play basketball.’
    • ‘Either the football coach or an athletic trainer initiated the injury report.’
    • ‘Children will be coached by top level coaches in each sport.’
    • ‘He said his executive used trained coaches and referees to educate sports teachers in schools as a way of broadening participation in youth programmes.’
    • ‘They hired a football coach who had been at a big school, but had a mediocre record.’
    • ‘There are current football coaches who have been doing their jobs longer than he has.’
    • ‘"Being a national team coach is a tough job.’
    • ‘So you want to be a college basketball coach?’
    • ‘Jenny now works as an assistant women's coach at the University of Oklahoma.’
    • ‘A US women's basketball coach says that she has unconditional love for the players.’
    • ‘It's no secret that inner-city coaches in any sport have one of the toughest jobs in all of high school athletics.’
    • ‘Each age group is run by a qualified rugby coach, but parents are encouraged to lend a hand.’
    • ‘Head football coaches are often hired without regard to specific criteria or clearly stated qualifications.’
    • ‘His mother Judy, the former national tennis coach, chaperones him to tournaments and does his washing.’
    • ‘The basketball coach or the music teacher needs no convincing regarding the value of drill and practice on fundamental skills.’
    • ‘So what, you ask, does a college basketball coach know about the state of college football?’
    • ‘Nominations for the program must be submitted via each swimmer's club coach.’
    • ‘But, ironically, so many football coaches do deeply believe that the toughest sport teaches virtues.’
    instructor, trainer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A tutor who gives private or specialized teaching.
      • ‘When it comes to reading, parents should think of themselves more as coaches than teachers.’
      • ‘K. C. refused to look at the notes and did only the portion where she studied with her coach and later practiced the words in sentences.’
      • ‘If the money was going for reading coaches in elementary schools, I might have been less likely to vote against it.’
      • ‘Money apparently can't buy you love or a decent acting coach.’
      • ‘In later years she was a coach and teacher, as well as a stager of ballets.’
      • ‘Much of my success in 1998 came from the lessons and training program my coach provided me.’
      • ‘I was thinking about how to prepare and hired a private coach.’
      • ‘Voice coach Sonia has trained some of the north west's top singers.’
      • ‘His wife, Kelly, keeps busy as an English teacher and coach at Oakdale High School.’
      • ‘A coach is trained to pick up nuances that others miss.’
      • ‘She said having a private coach has been a real benefit.’
      • ‘The concert was great, a wind band like they have in the schools but made up of adults many of whom are coaches and teachers.’
      • ‘Nature, of course, is improved upon by a phalanx of speech coaches, tutors, finishing lessons, cosmetics specialists and designers.’
      • ‘Margaret Thatcher covered her status as a woman when she trained with a voice coach to lower the timbre of her voice.’
      • ‘I have borrowed these tools from writers and editors, from authors of books on writing, and from teachers and writing coaches.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Train or instruct (a team or player)

    ‘he has coached the Edmeston Panthers for six years’
    • ‘For a time he coached swimmers, then moved into the business world.’
    • ‘He recruited or coached all of the players, and the team still adheres to the principles he instilled.’
    • ‘Despite coaching several of Britain's brightest stars, he yesterday announced that he would not go to Sydney, because it would take the spotlight off his athletes.’
    • ‘By the 5th grade, our physical education was passed to the hands of the woman who also coached the girl's sports teams.’
    • ‘He coached Super Bowl teams in Philadelphia and St. Louis.’
    • ‘His son was one of Indonesia's top players and now coaches the U.S. badminton team.’
    • ‘Teams of 1012 players will be coached as a team in preparation for next season.’
    • ‘It was last season when he was ruminating on the difficulty of coaching a superstar in his twilight years.’
    • ‘He found coaching his children's sports teams to be impractical.’
    • ‘I coach a junior high team and we have a problem with the scores being very one sided.’
    • ‘Jeffrey gave up his job as a professional player and began coaching a major league baseball team.’
    • ‘It's very difficult to coach players of such varying ages and experience within a team, so the way you approach it is very important.’
    • ‘He is a quiet player on the court, he coaches teammates, but doesn't get very emotional one way or the other.’
    • ‘He went on to become head of the maths department but also taught rugby and coached the school's various teams.’
    • ‘I enjoy picking my kids up from school, attending all their school activities and coaching their little league teams.’
    • ‘Throughout my playing career and my short time in management, I never thought players should determine who coached the team.’
    • ‘Talented young players will be coached and trained at the Football Academy.’
    • ‘The team was trained and coached by Paul Gleeson.’
    • ‘The recent National Lottery grant received by the club to train and coach swimmers was welcomed by Mr Martin.’
    • ‘He wants to be out on the pitch coaching and training a team.’
    1. 1.1 Give (someone) extra or private teaching.
      ‘he was coached to speak more slowly and curb his hand gestures’
      • ‘Two students coached by Pardina have won major prizes at the Prix de Lausanne international ballet competition.’
      • ‘I learned the finer points of grammar as a high schooler coaching elementary-school kids.’
      • ‘Tutors usually taught in their own homes, but rich families would invite teachers to their residences to coach their children.’
      • ‘In addition, retired dancers earn extra money coaching young artists so they can accept holiday engagements as guests in smaller companies.’
      • ‘What more could Peter achieve if he was coached within the college system?’
      • ‘The girls were coached by their teacher and the headmistress.’
      • ‘One of the teachers took him under his wing and coached him in drama.’
      • ‘Therefore, students were coached to improve their communication skills (both verbal and written).’
      • ‘She was being professionally coached and was halfway through recording a compact disc of love songs to launch her career.’
      • ‘These teachers were coached by trainers from the Education Ministry.’
      • ‘The student who used to coach her had found a summer job and had no more time to take care of her training.’
      • ‘A range of instrumentalists plus one of the finest international jazz singers, Tina May, will coach students in jazz and big band playing.’
      • ‘The family and a drama teacher who coached Diana in public speaking are all thought to be contesting ownership of the recordings which were made in the mid-1990s.’
      • ‘I would like to be a coach, to coach young dancers in the roles I have danced.’
      • ‘He was a drama teacher and also coached the speech team.’
      • ‘Parents first got their children privately coached by school teachers.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Teach (a subject or sport) as a coach.
      ‘a Washington realtor who coaches soccer’
      • ‘For the Club to continue more parents are needed to help out with coaching basketball.’
      • ‘Now retired, he spent his time teaching geography and coaching soccer, a life he loved very much.’
      • ‘I would probably be playing or coaching another sport.’
      • ‘Harris, who has extensive experience coaching international basketball, said he isn't worried about the language barrier.’
      • ‘He was also hired by New Albany High School in the autumn of 1913 to teach Spanish, Physics and Mathematics and to coach basketball.’
      • ‘Now 58, he lives in south London and coaches football in schools.’
      • ‘He is moving his family to Idaho this summer and will begin coaching football at the high school his sons will eventually attend.’
      • ‘He entered administration after coaching basketball for 22 years at every level from grade school to high school to college.’
      • ‘The only other thing I do that generates a similar feeling is coaching basketball.’
      • ‘During this time he coached basketball, directed choirs and built and renovated houses.’
      • ‘His primary teaching emphasis will be coaching Iowa State vocal students.’
      • ‘Todd has been involved in coaching basketball at the high school, college or professional level since 1976.’
      • ‘He began his teaching career in 1935 at Storer College, where he taught English and coached football.’
      • ‘Aged 57, he is deputy head at Solihull junior school, where he coaches rugby.’
      • ‘I have coached both swimming and water polo at the club, high school and collegiate levels.’
      • ‘Handball is now coached in over 80 Scottish primary schools, with volunteers from the association giving youngsters after-school tuition every week.’
      • ‘For her first 10 years on the job, she coached basketball and taught physical education.’
      • ‘As a teacher Andy worked at the City of London School, where he coached cricket and rugby.’
      • ‘Ben's hobbies are playing and coaching football.’
      • ‘He played rugby for 25 years in the U.K. and Europe before taking an interest in coaching the game.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Prompt or urge (someone) with instructions.
      ‘he had improperly coached the witness to testify more credibly’
      • ‘The teacher also coached some students and allowed others to share answers during the actual exam.’
      • ‘We played dodgeball without sissy rules and our gym teachers coached us to hit the other players where it hurt the most.’
      • ‘Teachers have, quite understandably, responded by coaching students into exams they are likely to pass and by discouraging less able students from sitting exams at all.’
      • ‘The formation flight got exciting as I coached the junior pilot through several maneuvers.’
      • ‘None of the tutorial sessions are designed to coach students for a standardized test.’
      • ‘The attorney representing the woman tried his best to coach the woman as instructed, and in an hour, the court reconvened.’
      • ‘Throughout the process, he has coached prospective candidates.’
      • ‘One boy was coached by several different language teachers to help him spell words with foreign roots, not to be able to speak or read the language better.’
      • ‘They collude, have unlimited access to finance, and bring witnesses who are coached to commit perjury.’
      • ‘Over the prison phone, he'd been coaching his alibi witness to commit perjury, so he had to explain the general setup inside a courtroom.’
      • ‘They're coached for the tests all the way through year six when music, art, history and geography are all sacrificed in favour of a curriculum of exam preparation.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century (as a verb): figuratively from coach.

Pronunciation

coach

/kōCH//koʊtʃ/