Main definitions of clock in English

: clock1clock2

clock1

noun

  • 1A mechanical or electrical device for measuring time, indicating hours, minutes, and sometimes seconds, typically by hands on a round dial or by displayed figures.

    • ‘Decker checked her antique clock on her desk.’
    • ‘Katrina reached across the bed and turned the clock on the nightstand.’
    • ‘Soon, Alyssa was pacing around the large room, looking at the antique cuckoo clock every few minutes.’
    • ‘A good example of a no UI solution is setting the clock on a VCR.’
    • ‘I looked at the clock on the VCR and rubbed the end of my eye.’
    • ‘I rolled over and looked at the digital alarm clock on my bedside table.’
    • ‘Looking to the antique grandfather clock in the hallway, I raised a brow.’
    • ‘She hears the grandfather clock chiming, but when she looks at it, it is running backwards.’
    • ‘He checked the cuckoo clock on the wall for the time and it was only nine twenty-five.’
    • ‘Some people find that a ticking clock in the room helps.’
    • ‘The clock on the mantelpiece shows the time to be 11 am.’
    • ‘Sighing, I glanced out the door to the clock on my bedside table.’
    • ‘He watched the ticking on his bedside clock until the minute hand felt more like the hour hand.’
    • ‘She slipped her arms into the sleeves as the clock chimed the three-quarter hour.’
    • ‘He is watching the clock strike the last minute of his tenure at the company.’
    • ‘Darryn's anxiety increased as he watched the ticking clock, wondering where Kara was.’
    • ‘I glanced at the digital alarm clock by my bed.’
    • ‘Adel and Doug entered the house just as the large grandfather clock struck twelve.’
    • ‘Melatonin resets the body clock to synchronize metabolic functions with times of activity and rest.’
    • ‘As soon as darkness was complete, Olivia looked to the clock beside her bed.’
    timepiece, timekeeper, timer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Time taken as a factor in an activity, especially in competitive sports.
      ‘they play against the clock’
      ‘her life is ruled by the clock’
      • ‘This could be the day that effectively decides this year's race as the riders go against the clock for the individual time trial.’
      • ‘It'd be a race against the clock, of course, until your youth runs out.’
      • ‘On a sprint day, each athlete races against the clock to gain a qualifying time on the course.’
      • ‘The Department of Finance faces a race against the clock: September 20 is the date on which the rules take effect.’
      • ‘In the Winchester Challenge competitors shoot against the clock.’
      • ‘She said that while being older meant she had more words to hand, the younger competitors tended to be quicker against the clock.’
      • ‘These are timed games against the clock - the faster you play, the higher you score.’
      • ‘Firefighters were battling against the clock to prevent the incident at Studley Grange landfill site from escalating into a major emergency.’
      • ‘In a time trial racers go one at a time competing only against the clock going out alone with no teammates to help.’
      • ‘They were dreading a race against the clock to get there in time until the M.E.N. stepped in to help organise cut-price air fares for the dedicated dozen.’
      • ‘Basso looked very good in the Giro and has improved against the clock since last year.’
      • ‘It was all done against the clock, too: after the middle of October, the Barents Sea is too inhospitable for rescue work.’
      • ‘The front-runner is racing against the clock to seal the deal because the F1 season closes in only a matter of weeks.’
      • ‘Each will compete against the clock on a section of Rockingham's infield ‘street’ circuit.’
      • ‘Driving against the clock increased the drivers' alertness, but led some to experience feelings of superiority or invulnerability.’
      • ‘Remarkably he beat the Texan in the first race against the clock at last year's event.’
      • ‘Each competitor has to complete the activity against the clock, with the one who completes the circuit in the fastest time the winner.’
      • ‘Champagne corks were popping when a three-week project against the clock was completed in time at a community centre in Ulverston.’
      • ‘When I'm out there I will be running against the clock rather than thinking in terms of placing.’
      • ‘Wiggins's stance is always to race against the clock rather than give time to thinking about his opponent.’
    2. 1.2informal A measuring device resembling a clock for recording things other than time, such as a speedometer, taximeter, or odometer.
      • ‘You remembered the extra 50 miles that every away loss puts on the clock going home.’
      • ‘But, given the luxury of her Jag, with just 1,000 miles on the clock, she wasn't too concerned.’
      • ‘Mr O'Brien was also advertising his top-of-the-range Rover 75 which had only 4,000 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘Now, despite having two million miles on the clock, it takes Doug and his wife Glynis all over the country to shows.’
      • ‘Ten minutes into the return journey, with only 360 miles on the clock, the engine started misfiring badly.’
      • ‘They will do the Plymouth to Dakar Challenge driving in their £70 Volvo car, which the pair purchased in Sweden with 230,000 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘I knew that I wanted a smallish 2004 automatic model with as few as possible kilometres on the clock.’
      • ‘It's a 2000 automatic with 60,000 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘But his favourite motor is the Ford Popular he keeps in pristine condition with just 48,000 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘Such a worn interior in a BMW with just 77,000 miles on the clock seemed highly unlikely.’
      • ‘His Hyundai Accent car was returned to Madrid airport on 18 July with some 1,250 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘Consider a two-year-old for €30,000, with less than 10,000 on the clock - they're not hard to find.’
      • ‘Be wary, as a 120,000-mile example would be showing just 20,000 on the clock.’
      • ‘I have a great 1995 Mercedes with just 115,000 on the clock.’
      • ‘Mud had been splattered across the front and on the roof, while between 40 and 60 extra miles had been put on the clock, they alleged.’
      • ‘Remarkably it had only one owner and came with 70,000 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘The Escort came back with 254 miles on the clock.’
      • ‘It had 184,000 miles on the clock when we set off and it's over 3,000 miles to Barcelona, but so far it's doing fine.’
      • ‘Firstly, most comparable cars seen in Namibia had over 180 000 km on the clock.’
      • ‘Generally there is no point with diesels as the power dies long before 4,000 rpm is on the clock.’
    3. 1.3
      • ‘One is synchronised with the processor clock, and the other a quarter of a cycle later.’
      • ‘With files shared among a large number of workstations, it becomes imperative that machines have their clocks synchronized so that file time stamps are globally comparable.’
      • ‘Naturally the BIOS of the motherboard has the clock throttling feature enabled, as its disabled by default.’
      • ‘They can be connected to the serial port of a PC and provide time signals synchronized on the NIST clock.’
      • ‘Finally, it is good practice to synchronize the clocks of all nodes using ntpd or something similar.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Attain or register (a specified time, distance, or speed)

    ‘Thomas has clocked up forty years service’
    [no object] ‘the book clocks in at 989 pages’
    • ‘After clocking up 10,000 miles, it still sounds as smooth as the day I first drove it.’
    • ‘Together, they clocked an average growth rate of 6.1% in 2002.’
    • ‘Despite rain-slickened roads, they clocked an average speed of 53.71 kph - the third fastest ever.’
    • ‘In a recent test, the prototype clocked a maximum speed of 193 mph, earning it the title of world's fastest EV limousine.’
    • ‘SMART - 1 clocked up 332 orbits around Earth, so that the distance it travelled was rather further than the 380,000 linear km to the moon.’
    • ‘In the 1988 Olympic final, Johnson beat Lewis, clocking a new world record of 9.79 seconds.’
    • ‘I very much doubt if any midfielder in the country clocked up the mileage the Curry man did on Sunday.’
    • ‘Hovercrafters can swiftly clock up speeds of around 80 mph.’
    • ‘After already clocking 120 points, they are relishing the prospect of the Boxing Day derby with Swinton.’
    • ‘Having clocked a speed of just over 240 miles per hour, this car still holds the record as the fastest production car ever.’
    • ‘They have gained awards after clocking up more than 200 hours of voluntary activity.’
    • ‘The 23-year-old rider from Hitchin clocked 34.626 seconds on her Olympic debut.’
    • ‘Can you savour the South American experience without clocking up monstrous mileage?’
    • ‘He was a prolific scorer from the first day out and he clocked up some unbelievable scoring totals.’
    • ‘I'd clocked more than 200 miles and my forearms were feeling the strain.’
    • ‘I took to running, clocking respectable times in 10K's and half marathons.’
    • ‘Crawford clocked 20.31 secs, with Gatlin eight one hundredths of a second back.’
    • ‘Of course, there is no question that Bannister ran the full distance and clocked the historic 3min 59.4sec.’
    • ‘Over 51 hours of community work was clocked up for the local koalas.’
    • ‘Clocking up a total of 60 miles it was a well worthwhile drive.’
    register, record, log
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Achieve (a victory)
      ‘he clocked up his first win of the year’
      • ‘They did it in the same fashion, clocking a world record to defeat the US.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Civil Service had their best result of the season when they clocked a ten-wicket victory over New Earswick.’
      • ‘They could clock up their first ever victory in Limerick and clinch station in the upper tier.’
      • ‘At The Australian, they reminisced about News Corp's Australian roots as Rupert clocked up yet another corporate victory.’
      • ‘Long Lee Under-13s B clocked up their third consecutive win with a 5-4 victory over Wilsden.’
      • ‘The trio has clocked up some notable achievements in its first decade and has been invited all over the world.’
      • ‘The visitors, who have clocked up 77 successive league wins, were given a stern test across all departments.’
      • ‘With the seer onside Sparta began to clock up successes.’
      • ‘They are in a strong position this term, however, having clocked up eight successive wins.’
      • ‘I clocked up 32 victories and 2 charged sigils in survival mode playing Tekken Tag Tournament yesterday.’
      • ‘Partick Thistle were another team celebrating after clocking up their third league success of the season with a 3-1 triumph over Stirling Albion at Firhill.’
      • ‘Long Lee Under-7s clocked up a 7-3 victory over Eldwick after Kian Shaw scored a goal in the first minute.’
      • ‘Jiangsu slip from second to fourth place as a result which clocked up an incredible 11-2 victory at home to Sichuan Mianyang.’
      • ‘After clocking up seven consecutive victories at the start of the league season, they were beaten by Sheffield.’
      • ‘Pipe's Marcel earlier clocked up a sixth straight win when claiming the Sharp Novices' Hurdle.’
      • ‘She finished in 9: 23.17 with Yelena Zadorozhnaya clocking up another Russian success ahead of Poland's Lidia Chojecka by 0.17 secs in 8: 53.45.’
      • ‘He has clocked up most of his big race victories in recent years, with a French Derby win on Celtic Swing in 1995 among the highlights.’
    2. 1.2Record as attaining a specified time or rate.
      ‘the tower operators clocked a gust of 185 mph’
      • ‘He said I was clocked doing 45 in a 30 mph zone.’
      • ‘Monitoring of the A590 has clocked cars, motorbikes and vans going more than 100 mph.’
      • ‘The England star was clocked speeding at an average of 92 mph on the M1, Leeds Magistrates Court was told.’
      • ‘His fastball was clocked as high as 95 mph in the eighth inning.’
      • ‘At one point on the straight kilometre course a speed gun clocks how fast you are going.’
      • ‘This means that the memory in E7205-based mainboards is clocked at the rate equal to the FSB frequency.’
      • ‘He pulled me over after clocking my speed at 110 mph.’
      • ‘Halo clocked our ground speed at over a hundred miles an hour.’
      • ‘A number of bikers were also reported for speeding with one clocked doing 96 mph.’
      • ‘Ten of those caught face a court appearance, mostly because they were clocked doing excessively high speeds.’
      • ‘The camera clocked the car at 51 mph and at 44 mph.’
      • ‘Police even brought in a spotter plane to clock the speeds of bikers, but it failed to deter them.’
      • ‘His fastball is clocked at 96 mph, and he has a good slider.’
      • ‘A friend of mine who owns a stolen radar gun once clocked my typing speed at roughly 120 words per minute.’
      • ‘I heard that someone was clocked doing 87 mph down here once.’
      • ‘Some individuals have been clocked at speeds of up to two and a half knots - useful if you want to pursue fish.’
      • ‘It has been clocked at speeds of up to 20 miles an hour (32 kilometers an hour) and can probably swim even faster than that.’
      • ‘One rider was clocked travelling at over 90 mph.’
  • 2informal Hit (someone), especially on the head.

    ‘someone clocked him for no good reason’
    • ‘She'd clocked him once in the face when he came out to apologize.’
    • ‘You clocked me in the midst of a fight that shouldn't even have happened, and all you can think about is yourself?’
    • ‘He looked around, his own arms hanging at his sides, but ready to clock the first person who laid a hand on him.’
    • ‘One of these days someone was going to call his bluff and leap over that desk to clock him one.’
    • ‘I walked quickly and quietly up to the corner and took out a small bat, waiting for the guard to pass by to clock him over the head.’
    • ‘Jayde looks to the thug that clocked him and responds with a flurry of punches, almost as if he has gone berserk.’
    • ‘Fine, I hope she clocks him one right on the nose, we've got to be moving in a minute.’
    • ‘It took me only a few beats of a pause to realize Marilyn clocked me hard with her own fist.’
    • ‘He would at least describe the wench who'd clocked him with a trunk.’
    • ‘There was still a tender spot there from when Henley had clocked him, but he couldn't remember where he'd gotten it.’
    • ‘I clocked him in the back of the head and Taylor said ‘so there’ again.’
    • ‘‘Busy night,’ Noah said lightly, lifting his arm slightly to avoid clocking an elder gentlemen in the head.’
    • ‘The sucker clocks me good on the left cheek-bone.’
    • ‘He remembers another prisoner clocking him with an iron pipe.’
    • ‘Only thing Doc could shoot out was his fist though, which he did, clocking the patient to the back of his head.’
    • ‘I jerked upright in bed and clocked him in the jaw and we quickly returned to the floor in a brotherly-scuffle once more.’
    • ‘And I'm going to clock the next person I hear quote the old Chinese proverb ‘may we live in interesting times’.’
    • ‘Well, he was laughing anyway, until I clocked him.’
    • ‘I spun around and clocked him in the fist with my big hand, then swooped in low for an uppercut with my little hand.’
    • ‘He clocked me but by that time they had already smashed the front of the shop door.’

Phrases

  • around (or round) the clock

    • All day and all night.

      ‘working around the clock’
      • ‘For the last four days, a team of more than 400 workers has operated around the clock to ready the city for its big night.’
      • ‘Work is going on round the clock to ensure the opening night goes as planned.’
      • ‘Doctors and surgeons are working around the clock as the injured continue to arrive from outlying areas.’
      • ‘Employers argue that hospitals are busy around the clock and learning takes place throughout the day and night.’
      • ‘The containers continued to arrive around the clock for the next several days.’
      • ‘The second day, we could have legitimately reported flights were taking off round the clock day and night.’
      • ‘Jointing on the first cables will begin shortly and will continue round the clock.’
      • ‘Flood prevention workers continue to patrol the dam around the clock.’
      • ‘We fought around the clock and continued to support the Marines as they cleared houses.’
      • ‘Meanwhile Glasgow City Council has pledged that staff will continue to work around the clock to ease road and footpath problems.’
  • run out the clock

    • (especially in sports) deliberately use as much time as possible in order to preserve one's own team's advantage.

      ‘facing a tie, he decided to run out the clock in the final moments’
      • ‘Holmgren, wanting the ball back, thought the Broncos had a first down and was afraid they'd run out the clock before scoring.’
      • ‘Owen caught for the first down, and the Niners ran out the clock.’
      • ‘We thanked our lucky stars, ran out the clock, and got ready to face the mighty Colts in that game everyone seems to remember.’
      • ‘They won't run out the clock when they've got a lead, yet they'll call running plays when they're down and need to move up the field quickly.’
      • ‘Any football coach in America would call a quarterback draw to run out the clock.’
      • ‘The truth is, though, that the Niners were already dead in the water by the time they decided to run out the clock in the first half.’
      • ‘Now, having helped run out the clock, the five regret that time's up.’
      • ‘But unable to run out the clock, Jacksonville was forced to punt from their own 34 with 3: 21 remaining.’
      • ‘Not only does it encourage more exciting finishes, it makes it harder to just run out the clock and prevent those last-minute heartstoppers.’
      • ‘With a comfortable lead, the team was content to run out the clock and seal the win.’
  • stop the clock

    • Allow extra time by temporarily ceasing to count the time left before a deadline arrives.

      ‘he agreed to stop the clock as negotiations continued’
      • ‘She didn't hear the referee blow her whistle and stop the clock.’
      • ‘The UK Takeover Panel could also stop the clock and rule foul play by temporarily stopping Ojjeh from voting her shares.’
      • ‘But I cannot stop the clock and I'm nearly 64 now.’
      • ‘Many leagues use a running clock or stop the clock only in the last minute.’
      • ‘Today, much of Europe wants to stop the clock on food progress.’
      • ‘I had asked the time-keeper to stop the clock but he said he would have to get the instruction from the referee first.’
      • ‘Instead of spiking the ball to stop the clock and give his team another chance, Allen threw a pass.’
      • ‘Rather, the intrigue is related to how quickly Peirsol can stop the clock.’
      • ‘After three completions and a spike to stop the clock, McNair tested Faggins twice more with nothing to show for it.’
      • ‘A desperation offense normally attempts to get the ball to the best driver in an effort to pick up a three-point play and stop the clock.’
  • turn (or put) back the clock

    • Return to the past or to a previous way of doing things.

      • ‘She wishes she could turn back the clock and return to the innocence of childhhood.’
      • ‘At a leisurely lunch in New York's romantic Cafe des Artistes, customers were quick to credit red wine with turning back the clock.’
      • ‘Now his music-loving supporters are flocking to his new venture in which he is turning back the clock.’
      • ‘Inspired by Strauss's hatred for liberal modernity, its goal is to turn back the clock on the liberal revolution and its achievements.’
      • ‘I'm not saying we should turn the clock back 50 or 60 years.’
      • ‘‘We're not in the business of turning back the clock,’ he says.’
      • ‘The cows are coming home to Horton-in-Ribblesdale, turning back the clock 40 years.’
      • ‘They want basically to run out the clock on the ground and to turn back the clock on the Supreme Court.’
      • ‘This does not imply turning back the clock, or reimposing the social constraints of the past.’
      • ‘As time runs out for Livingston, others are turning back the clock.’
  • watch the clock

    • (of an employee) be overly strict or zealous about not working more than one's required hours.

      • ‘How many jobs are there where individuals are just watching the clock until they can scamper home?’
      • ‘One sign that I love my job is that I never watch the clock.’
      • ‘I tried this and actually zipped through an hour's worth of work while watching the clock for both my next break and my next flash of work.’
      • ‘So I watch the clock, longing for lunch hour, when I might be able to run an errand or at least do some yoga.’
      • ‘They never watched the clock, never dreaded Mondays, never worried about the years passing by.’
      • ‘Show up on time, don't watch the clock, keep busy.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • clock in (or out)

    • (of an employee) punch in (or out)

      • ‘Softworks is one of the few companies in the world to facilitate an honour-based company culture where employees do not clock in.’
      • ‘It is freedom from the morning commute, clocking in and out, tea breaks, and overtime.’
      • ‘Biometric readers can also help prevent employee ghosting, where one employee clocks in an absent or late coworker by swiping his or her card.’
      • ‘When an employee clocks in or out, the employee scans his or her identification badge and a barcode representing the job the person is doing.’
      • ‘Makeup must be worn at all times when working; employees should clock in only after changing and putting on makeup.’
      • ‘Jefferson County, Alabama is calling time on fraudulent overtime claims by making non-salaried employees clock in with their fingerprints.’
      • ‘Workers who clock in while ill cost their employers 20 percent more per day than employees who take time off.’
      • ‘I've heard plenty of reports of people clocking in for friends who are off driving taxis around Heathrow.’
      • ‘She was fired some three months ago after protesting against the company's policy of forcing employees to work overtime while not clocked in.’
      • ‘The designated boxes are commonly found wherever employees clock in, she said.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch klocke, based on medieval Latin clocca bell.

Pronunciation:

clock

/kläk/

Main definitions of clock in English

: clock1clock2

clock2

noun

dated
  • An ornamental pattern woven or embroidered on the side of a stocking or sock near the ankle.

    • ‘She wears her original outfit of fleecy jacket with embroidered clock.’
    • ‘I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark blue clocks on them.’
    • ‘The Spanish made socks from knitted silk and embroidered them with clock emblems.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

clock

/kläk/