Main definitions of clobber in English

: clobber1clobber2

clobber1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1 Hit (someone) hard.

    ‘if he does that I'll clobber him!’
    • ‘Most people would do one of two things: leave, or grab a baseball bat and clobber whatever it was that wasn't supposed to be there.’
    • ‘This time she just sidestepped away from him, and when he'd missed her, she clobbered him from the back with a metal folding chair she'd found nearby.’
    • ‘Someone clobbered me from behind - found out it was Buddy.’
    • ‘She clobbered me in another hug, and I gave myself another kick.’
    • ‘If Mac ever learns of this, he is going to clobber me.’
    • ‘Though it did feel extremely warm for the brief seconds it had been there I grabbed it off of my thighs and clobbered him in the arm.’
    • ‘Yes - and before we get clobbered by someone in a koala outfit - we know that's exactly what the big boys do.’
    • ‘The first thing that Coach did when we entered the huddle was clobber Zeke in a huge bear hug.’
    • ‘You never know what might be coming to clobber you.’
    • ‘She clobbered him with a variety of items, mostly pillows from the round bed, all but forcing him out the room.’
    • ‘I clobbered him with the butt of my cutlass and in no time had the respect of the toughest men in the establishment.’
    • ‘Mrs. Joe is Pip's sister, who raises Pip with a heavy hand and is a generally unpleasant woman until a mysterious intruder clobbers her with an iron shackle.’
    • ‘Shakarr tore the beam off and clobbered her over the head with it.’
    • ‘‘You are this close to making me run over to the White House and clobbering you,’ she warned.’
    • ‘But obviously any impatient pedestrian stepping out immediately on getting a green man only has himself to blame if he's clobbered.’
    • ‘A far more likely disaster would be a staff member being clobbered by a chimp, intentionally or not.’
    • ‘Erik glared at Death, but managed to restrain himself from clobbering him.’
    • ‘She felt like clobbering him and screaming at him that she had done nothing but walk since she had gotten stuck in this stupid world.’
    • ‘Dawn had to leap away because if she hadn't Rachel would've clobbered her again.’
    • ‘So while her husband wrestled with the man, who threatened to pull a knife on the pair, Mrs Harfield clobbered him with the handle.’
    1. 1.1Treat or deal with harshly.
      ‘the recession clobbered other parts of the business’
      • ‘We're just clobbered in so many places that I think we're getting used to the clobbering.’
      • ‘The banks have been clobbered again for the way they deal with consumers.’
      • ‘Once again, it proposes to clobber the motorist.’
      • ‘It's unclear how many users were clobbered by the assault.’
      • ‘Clydesdale Bank charges a whopping 33.51% as well as clobbering you with fees.’
      • ‘Because I had never had a cold sore before, the virus clobbered me with a very high fever.’
      • ‘In its content, its volume - aural and spatial - and its relentless pace, Dark Threat clobbers the viewer with an aggression so intense it tempts laughter.’
      • ‘The Government clobbers the driver for using the car, but what alternative do people have?’
      • ‘We got clobbered by the press, but we sold out for seven weeks.’
      • ‘Do you honestly think verbally clobbering people will suddenly make them smile at you, act super nice and grant all your wishes?’
      • ‘It means that the people who are most likely to invest, most likely to acquire skill, and most likely to take entrepreneurial risks, are the people whom this tax system clobbers most heavily.’
      • ‘Whatever the reason for ATLA's no-show, the resulting press clobbered trial lawyers.’
      • ‘What better, then, than a comprehensive and authoritative assessment of how the town hall that just clobbered you with inflation-busing rises is actually performing.’
      • ‘A crash was on the way, Baker pointed out, and it would financially clobber many working people.’
      • ‘Forgive my clobbering you with so many names, but credit must be given where it is due.’
      • ‘What's stopping assistant coach Patrick Ewing from clobbering him in practice.’
      • ‘It worries me that DEFRA is putting more restrictions on movements, when all that seems to be doing is clobbering the farmer.’
      • ‘One reason they fare well: Manufacturers get clobbered in a recession.’
    2. 1.2Defeat heavily.
      [with object] ‘the Braves clobbered the Cubs 23–10’
      • ‘In that start at Belmont Park, she clobbered eight rivals to win by 8 ¼ lengths.’
      • ‘He didn't want to miss a minute of his favorite team getting clobbered by the enemy.’
      • ‘Yet they were clobbered, suffering their worst defeat.’
      • ‘And there was Bobby himself, who, however, gave it up when he got clobbered by oldies thirty years his senior.’
      • ‘I don't remember the topic (they are, after all, mostly interchangeable), but I clobbered her.’
      • ‘The hard lesson here is to fly your own flight even when you ‘know’ the lead gaggle is up ahead and clobbering you.’
      • ‘Mike won a closer-than-expected victory for governor and Janet was clobbered in her race.’
      • ‘So, no big deal, Carlow defeated the all-Ireland champions in the same competition a few seasons back, and clobbered Dublin too.’
      • ‘There, when one side clobbers the other, the response is clobber back.’
      • ‘‘That's the series that clobbered me,’ Brett said.’
      • ‘During the fifteen minute game I clobbered my dad with the video version of himself, leaving us in near silence.’

Origin

World War II (apparently British air-force slang): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

clobber

/ˈkläbər/

Main definitions of clobber in English

: clobber1clobber2

clobber2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Add enameled decoration to (porcelain)

    • ‘The Dutch, in particular, used clobbering to embellish Chinese blue and white export and Meissen porcelain during the 18th and 19th centuries.’
    • ‘The hateful practice of clobbering oriental porcelain, already begun, pointed a cheap and easy way to the decorators of faience.’

Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

clobber

/ˈkläbər/