Main definitions of clobber in US English:

: clobber1clobber2clobber3

clobber1

verb

[with object]informal
  • 1Hit (someone) hard.

    ‘if he does that I'll clobber him!’
    • ‘Yes - and before we get clobbered by someone in a koala outfit - we know that's exactly what the big boys do.’
    • ‘The first thing that Coach did when we entered the huddle was clobber Zeke in a huge bear hug.’
    • ‘Someone clobbered me from behind - found out it was Buddy.’
    • ‘She felt like clobbering him and screaming at him that she had done nothing but walk since she had gotten stuck in this stupid world.’
    • ‘She clobbered me in another hug, and I gave myself another kick.’
    • ‘Shakarr tore the beam off and clobbered her over the head with it.’
    • ‘‘You are this close to making me run over to the White House and clobbering you,’ she warned.’
    • ‘She clobbered him with a variety of items, mostly pillows from the round bed, all but forcing him out the room.’
    • ‘But obviously any impatient pedestrian stepping out immediately on getting a green man only has himself to blame if he's clobbered.’
    • ‘Mrs. Joe is Pip's sister, who raises Pip with a heavy hand and is a generally unpleasant woman until a mysterious intruder clobbers her with an iron shackle.’
    • ‘Most people would do one of two things: leave, or grab a baseball bat and clobber whatever it was that wasn't supposed to be there.’
    • ‘Though it did feel extremely warm for the brief seconds it had been there I grabbed it off of my thighs and clobbered him in the arm.’
    • ‘I clobbered him with the butt of my cutlass and in no time had the respect of the toughest men in the establishment.’
    • ‘This time she just sidestepped away from him, and when he'd missed her, she clobbered him from the back with a metal folding chair she'd found nearby.’
    • ‘Dawn had to leap away because if she hadn't Rachel would've clobbered her again.’
    • ‘You never know what might be coming to clobber you.’
    • ‘If Mac ever learns of this, he is going to clobber me.’
    • ‘Erik glared at Death, but managed to restrain himself from clobbering him.’
    • ‘So while her husband wrestled with the man, who threatened to pull a knife on the pair, Mrs Harfield clobbered him with the handle.’
    • ‘A far more likely disaster would be a staff member being clobbered by a chimp, intentionally or not.’
    hit, strike, slap, smack, cuff, punch, beat, thrash, thump, batter, belabour, drub, hook, pound, smash, slam, welt, pummel, hammer, bang, knock, swat, whip, flog, cane, sucker-punch, rain blows on, give someone a beating, give someone a drubbing, give someone a good beating, give someone a good drubbing, box someone's ears
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Treat or deal with harshly.
      ‘the recession clobbered other parts of the business’
      • ‘Once again, it proposes to clobber the motorist.’
      • ‘The Government clobbers the driver for using the car, but what alternative do people have?’
      • ‘Whatever the reason for ATLA's no-show, the resulting press clobbered trial lawyers.’
      • ‘In its content, its volume - aural and spatial - and its relentless pace, Dark Threat clobbers the viewer with an aggression so intense it tempts laughter.’
      • ‘We're just clobbered in so many places that I think we're getting used to the clobbering.’
      • ‘We got clobbered by the press, but we sold out for seven weeks.’
      • ‘It's unclear how many users were clobbered by the assault.’
      • ‘Because I had never had a cold sore before, the virus clobbered me with a very high fever.’
      • ‘It worries me that DEFRA is putting more restrictions on movements, when all that seems to be doing is clobbering the farmer.’
      • ‘Clydesdale Bank charges a whopping 33.51% as well as clobbering you with fees.’
      • ‘What's stopping assistant coach Patrick Ewing from clobbering him in practice.’
      • ‘Forgive my clobbering you with so many names, but credit must be given where it is due.’
      • ‘The banks have been clobbered again for the way they deal with consumers.’
      • ‘A crash was on the way, Baker pointed out, and it would financially clobber many working people.’
      • ‘It means that the people who are most likely to invest, most likely to acquire skill, and most likely to take entrepreneurial risks, are the people whom this tax system clobbers most heavily.’
      • ‘What better, then, than a comprehensive and authoritative assessment of how the town hall that just clobbered you with inflation-busing rises is actually performing.’
      • ‘One reason they fare well: Manufacturers get clobbered in a recession.’
      • ‘Do you honestly think verbally clobbering people will suddenly make them smile at you, act super nice and grant all your wishes?’
    2. 1.2 Defeat heavily.
      with object ‘the Braves clobbered the Cubs 23–10’
      • ‘‘That's the series that clobbered me,’ Brett said.’
      • ‘Mike won a closer-than-expected victory for governor and Janet was clobbered in her race.’
      • ‘The hard lesson here is to fly your own flight even when you ‘know’ the lead gaggle is up ahead and clobbering you.’
      • ‘There, when one side clobbers the other, the response is clobber back.’
      • ‘In that start at Belmont Park, she clobbered eight rivals to win by 8 ¼ lengths.’
      • ‘So, no big deal, Carlow defeated the all-Ireland champions in the same competition a few seasons back, and clobbered Dublin too.’
      • ‘And there was Bobby himself, who, however, gave it up when he got clobbered by oldies thirty years his senior.’
      • ‘Yet they were clobbered, suffering their worst defeat.’
      • ‘He didn't want to miss a minute of his favorite team getting clobbered by the enemy.’
      • ‘During the fifteen minute game I clobbered my dad with the video version of himself, leaving us in near silence.’
      • ‘I don't remember the topic (they are, after all, mostly interchangeable), but I clobbered her.’
      beat, conquer, win against, win a victory over, triumph over, prevail over, get the better of, best, worst, vanquish
      View synonyms

Origin

Second World War (apparently air force slang): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

clobber

/ˈkläbər//ˈklɑbər/

Main definitions of clobber in US English:

: clobber1clobber2clobber3

clobber2

noun

British
informal
  • Clothing, personal belongings, or equipment.

    ‘I found all his clobber in the locker’
    • ‘Oh to be a Modern Urbanist - this is the kind of person who'll probably wearing the Levi's / Philips clobber.’
    • ‘When you've gone to all the trouble of getting dressed up in your best clobber, it's so undignified.’
    • ‘The boys wore the standard fan clobber of polo shirts and England strips and draped themselves in flags and beer.’
    • ‘But how else to get to Brittany with all the clobber required for a baby of six months and a two-year-old?’
    • ‘The family-run emporium is a Mecca for bargain hunters keen to load up on deeply discounted designer clobber.’
    • ‘We spend hours preening and dressing in fashionable clobber, and still look like a tired old sack of spuds.’
    • ‘And for the occasion the men are given cash to buy some new clobber for the girls, so that they can show them off at their best - they even get to pick the hairdos.’
    • ‘But when Owen gets all his old clobber out of storage and summons a barber to his hotel room to spruce him up, it shows how great he would be as 007.’
    • ‘Take the example of a normal worker whose teenage kids want the latest branded clobber.’
    • ‘If women don't buy their winter clobber in late August, they won't buy it at all.’
    • ‘But why shouldn't a teacher aspire to the latest designer clobber like everyone else?’
    • ‘She characterises girls in traditional clobber as ‘wanting to go to school dressed in a sleeping bag’.’
    • ‘You will probably see a lot of young people going around in the clobber of the time, some of which, is now back in fashion.’
    • ‘But thanks to our increasing visual sophistication, pretty models and natty clobber is not nearly enough.’
    • ‘On Monday night, they can put on their best clobber and eat at one of the hotel's two restaurants.’
    • ‘The choice of clobber has a practical benefit though.’
    • ‘When he gets home, he buys himself a new flat and a Porsche, splashes out on new clobber and heads at midday to the boozer.’
    • ‘And so it went, until all players were seated in the rooms in their street clobber.’
    • ‘Well, it's not like I needed to worry about trying to wash things and keep them clean; not with all the new clobber I had.’
    • ‘And let's face it, the Sally Army are probably the only folk on the planet who would gratefully accept clobber from the flamboyantly dressed Swede.’
    clothes, clothing, garments, articles of clothing, articles of dress, attire, garb
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

clobber

/ˈkläbər//ˈklɑbər/

Main definitions of clobber in US English:

: clobber1clobber2clobber3

clobber3

verb

[with object]
  • Add enameled decoration to (porcelain).

    • ‘The hateful practice of clobbering oriental porcelain, already begun, pointed a cheap and easy way to the decorators of faience.’
    • ‘The Dutch, in particular, used clobbering to embellish Chinese blue and white export and Meissen porcelain during the 18th and 19th centuries.’

Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

clobber

/ˈkläbər//ˈklɑbər/