Definition of classify in English:

classify

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Arrange (a group of people or things) in classes or categories according to shared qualities or characteristics.

    ‘mountain peaks are classified according to their shape’
    • ‘Information categorization is the process by which documents are classified into different categories.’
    • ‘Science is knowledge arranged and classified according to truth, facts, and the general laws of nature.’
    • ‘If you spot other incorrectly classified books, feel free to relocate them.’
    • ‘Rural areas in India can be broadly classified into three categories.’
    • ‘If they do, they are, of course, classified on that basis.’
    • ‘For instance, the search engine's ability to classify information through the use of meta-tags written by a programmer can distance the user from his or her original course.’
    • ‘As shown in the table, all 25 specimens from Dover were correctly classified.’
    • ‘Smaller chunks of ice without proper names do get classified into categories.’
    • ‘Soils within the park have been classified into 29 types.’
    • ‘Overall, 94.9 % of the participants were correctly classified into their respective smoking groups.’
    • ‘Techniques have been developed to automatically classify documents with respect to their topic.’
    • ‘The tickets have been classified into nine categories to cater for different sets of target customers.’
    • ‘A table at the end of the book also classifies documents into a number of topical categories.’
    • ‘These groups are classified into three cultures: those in the interior, the countryside, and the coastal regions.’
    • ‘Mothers were thus classified into two distinct groups.’
    • ‘Next to these volumes was a notebook where he keeps a handwritten, detailed catalog of all the items in the collection, classified by writer, title, publisher, and the book's location in his library.’
    • ‘This may well be intentional since this book has been classified for historical reading.’
    • ‘Another of his interests was in classifying information and he made substantial contributions to this in his work in preparing a cumulative index for the first 23 volumes of the Mathematics of Computation.’
    • ‘A successful insurance policy allows individuals to be correctly classified into a risk category.’
    • ‘These shares are classified by their back-end or contingent deferred sales charge.’
    put in order, order, set out, lay out, spread out, array, present, put out, display, exhibit, group, sort, organize, tidy, position, dispose
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Assign (someone or something) to a particular class or category.
      ‘elements are usually classified as metals or nonmetals’
      • ‘The detainees are all classified as category A prisoners and spend between 20 and 24 hours a day inside their cells.’
      • ‘For a pothole to be classified as ‘Category One’ it would have to be four inches deep, or be assessed by an expert as being dangerous on other grounds.’
      • ‘For an employment category to be classified as specified, there must be a low probability of its members reaching the minimum requisite rank because of its career structure.’
      • ‘Respondents had to correctly identify the brand name or company name in order to be classified as providing a correct response.’
      • ‘A concussion that does result in a loss of consciousness is typically classified as a higher grade, or more severe, concussion.’
      • ‘If there is no evidence of bleeding, the error would be classified as a category D.’
      • ‘Two were classified as level five - the most serious category.’
      • ‘Of the 264 items listed, 228 were classified as symbolic beliefs (the remaining 36 were descriptions of gay men or lesbian women).’
      • ‘The Regatta is classified as a category C event.’
      • ‘These rates are classified as minimal; however, 14 per 10 000 of these minor events were reported as significant.’
      • ‘He hopes to be classified as a refugee and assigned to a country so he can complete high school and go on to university.’
      • ‘In Johannesburg, for example, the jacaranda tree, currently in bloom across the city, is classified as a category three invasive plant.’
      • ‘For the first time in the five-year history of the Classic, it is being classified as a Category 1 event by the World Professional Darts Council.’
      • ‘They found that similar rates of women were classified as low risk (48% in private hospitals and 49% in public).’
      • ‘As a result people coming from countries on the list cannot be classified as asylum seekers because, by definition, none of its citizens can be considered under threat.’
      • ‘In order to be classified as sci-fi does a piece have to overtly explain itself in scientific terms?’
      • ‘Tumors were classified as high grade when the combined Gleason score was 7 or above and as low grade when the combined score was 6 or below.’
      • ‘These genes are classified as growth rate regulated genes.’
      • ‘Many diseases previously classified as Th1 or Th2 dominant fail to meet the set criteria.’
      • ‘The film has been classified as category III in Hong Kong, meaning it can only be shown to persons aged over 18.’
    2. 1.2Designate (documents or information) as officially secret or to which only authorized people may have access.
      ‘government officials classified 6.3 million documents in 1992’
      • ‘One source of amusement was the fact that virtually anyone could classify a document, while a high-level review was required to declassify it.’
      • ‘The United States Government classifies information according to the degree which the unauthorized disclosure would damage national security.’
      • ‘What is the essence of balancing the vital interests of the state, society, and individuals in classifying information on arms and military equipment?’
      • ‘Many of the records are classified top secret, with much of the information withheld from release due to its perceived sensitivity.’
      • ‘We have learned to our dismay how quick government officials are to classify information, even when it is already in the public domain.’
      • ‘There are exceptions to protect the privacy of individuals, but the state's power to classify documents as national-security secrets is strictly limited.’
      • ‘Unlike the U.S., the USSR classified all hard information on their space program as state secrets.’
      • ‘But remember that information is classified for a certain time period.’
      • ‘And if allowed, they will classify the documents for 100 years.’
      • ‘Only the president, the premier or cabinet members acting as proxy for either of them can classify a document as ‘top secret.’’
      • ‘The administration's addiction to classifying documents is making an unnecessary casualty of the openness vital to democracy.’

Origin

Late 18th century: back-formation from classification, from French, from classe class from Latin classis division.

Pronunciation:

classify

/ˈklasəˌfī/