Definition of classification in English:

classification

noun

  • 1The action or process of classifying something according to shared qualities or characteristics.

    ‘the classification of disease according to symptoms’
    • ‘A functional classification of the banking institutions is based on their respective business activities.’
    • ‘Poor kids were rejected by the same classification system as well.’
    • ‘For example, in faceted classification you will probably want to label each facet.’
    • ‘Does this represent a revolution in classification processes?’
    • ‘Diagnostic codes (based on the international classification of diseases) are registered.’
    • ‘More importantly, this classification process enables us to begin to understand the value of our data.’
    • ‘Virtually every book and paper on historical linguistics assumes a hierarchical classification.’
    • ‘No single classification scheme for bronchiolar diseases has been widely accepted.’
    • ‘The hierarchical classification involved with physical height seems clearly to hold for many cultures.’
    • ‘When one looks at the classification schema, it makes sense.’
    • ‘Because of the complex diversity of savanna monkeys, many different classification schemes exist.’
    • ‘Wound classification should be a collaborative effort between surgeons and perioperative nurses.’
    • ‘Both male and females are encouraged to play, and because of the classification process gender advantages don't exist.’
    • ‘Scale is one of the classification criteria used in my geological model.’
    • ‘Following correct classification of this stimulus, the next word in the list was presented.’
    • ‘Typologies are classification systems based on theoretical assumptions and constructs.’
    • ‘The process of classification determines what material is suitable for which age group, and in this it seems fair enough.’
    • ‘Like all classification systems, genre typologies are not naive, innocent or objective.’
    • ‘The Consortium's classification scheme seems to assume that their categories are relevant internationally.’
    • ‘Even without a complete hierarchical system for classification, metadata is useful where pure full text search fails.’
    categorization, categorizing, classifying, classing, grouping, grading, ranking, organization, sorting, codification, systematization, stratification
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    1. 1.1Biology The arrangement of animals and plants in taxonomic groups according to their observed similarities (including at least kingdom and phylum in animals, division in plants, and class, order, family, genus, and species)
      • ‘Classification within the genus Italopodisma, based solely on subtle differences in the shape of the male genitalia, is known to be difficult.’
      • ‘Recent rapid advances in molecular systematics have shaken the fundamental bases of fungus classification.’
      • ‘Early debate about their classification arose from their unusual mixture of morphologic characters.’
      • ‘The previous classification of wagtails clearly conflicts with the mtDNA divisions.’
      • ‘More detailed classification of platyhelminths is available from the Tree of Life at the University of Arizona.’
    2. 1.2 A category into which something is put.
      • ‘Traditional degree classifications could become a thing of the past after a new report declared them outdated.’
      • ‘And there you have the answer that makes the classifications practical, given the formal style of Chinese art.’
      • ‘However, with four possible severity classifications, 25 % of participants would be correctly classified by random assignment.’
      • ‘However, it became increasingly clear that six classifications could not fully explain the impact of class on buying behaviour.’
      • ‘Such a size disparity, over two weight classifications, is not permitted under the rules.’
      • ‘After this penalty, the South African lost two places in the overall classification.’
      • ‘Several classifications are used to categorize individual apple trees.’
      • ‘There is no specific list of surgical procedures with corresponding wound classifications.’
      • ‘It would mean changing its existing two-tier share classifications into a single share category.’
      • ‘These classifications are further subdivided for male and female students.’
      • ‘There were types and classifications of trash, and each had to be handled in its special way.’
      • ‘The proposed new categories have parallels with the classifications which are already used for unit trusts.’
      • ‘We also need to allow individuals and groups to determine their own identities free of bureaucratic classifications.’
      • ‘You are not bound, of course, to accept the categories or classifications.’
      • ‘Given the myriad of asset classes and fund classifications, measuring fund performance is difficult.’
      • ‘In whose interest does it serve to make such stark classifications?’
      • ‘Such classifications are required and are secular more than religious.’
      • ‘The total score on the instrument determines security classification.’
      • ‘In the older population the use of classifications based on current occupation is problematic.’
      • ‘The researcher records a score for the number of errors and notes the classifications and type of each.’
      category, class, group, grouping, grade, grading, rating, ranking, bracket
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Pronunciation

classification

/ˌklæsəfəˈkeɪʃ(ə)n//ˌklasəfəˈkāSH(ə)n/