Definition of classic in US English:

classic

adjective

  • 1Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind.

    ‘a classic novel’
    ‘a classic car’
    • ‘Overall I was very impressed with the quality of classic car that I saw at the show.’
    • ‘She was still interpreting great, great classic songs.’
    • ‘Many unique and now classic cases are described in the nine chapters of this book.’
    • ‘You name one classic song that's come out of this new breed of bands.’
    • ‘People are quick to defend the first season as classic comedy.’
    • ‘The way they all spoke of it, it sounded like classic Americana.’
    • ‘Carefully-chosen classic antiques and quality paintings should yield solid returns over time.’
    • ‘During his recuperation period he listened to classic hip-hop albums and decided he would become a rapper.’
    • ‘I'd still like to see a stylish remake of this classic tale.’
    • ‘The qualities of letter forms at their best are the qualities of a classic time: order, simplicity, grace.’
    • ‘I worked on films one after the other and after a while they all sort of blend together and you don't get the feeling it was a classic period in your life.’
    • ‘Indeed, it is the view taken in many of what are now classic plant anatomy texts.’
    • ‘While architects have often drawn on the past to embellish their schemes, few have so comprehensively taken so much from one classic period.’
    • ‘Charlotte is the author of the classic novel Jane Eyre, one of the top 20 most popular reads in the country.’
    • ‘Finding the ideal location took as long as finding a rare classic car.’
    • ‘The story is a classic tale of an unaccountable bureaucracy versus the little guy.’
    • ‘Twelfth Night is the classic Shakespearean comedy revolving around disguise, misunderstanding and love.’
    • ‘Yes it is a tad flaky but it's also classic Hollywood high-concept cuteness.’
    • ‘It will happily cruise along all day at around 70 mph, which makes it an ideal classic car for those who expect to be doing a fair few miles on a regular basis.’
    • ‘Provided you know the rules, investing in a classic car is an ideal way to get your hands on a sporty roadster or upmarket saloon for a fraction of the price you'd pay for a new model.’
    definitive, authoritative
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    1. 1.1 (of a garment or design) of a simple, elegant style not greatly subject to changes in fashion.
      ‘this classic navy blazer’
      • ‘If you live in your jeans, classic styles like relaxed fit transfer well from year to year.’
      • ‘This jacket can be worn with sleek pants and a stylish shirt, or a classic sweater and jeans.’
      • ‘Only the more classic styles will pass with a dressy outfit.’
      • ‘Get with the trend and purchase this classic jean jacket style corduroy jacket.’
      • ‘Other than that, it's an awesome take on a classic design.’
      • ‘The breathable, lightweight garments come in simple, classic designs.’
      • ‘For more vibrantly classic dresses, these two would be the winner.’
      • ‘The timeless classic designs are well represented by the charming all-around necklace with dainty crystal pace elements.’
      • ‘Purists may object to the use of stainless steel in such a traditional classic design but I don't see it that way at all.’
      • ‘You'll find classic designs for a wide range of tastes and styles, including necklaces, bracelets and hair charms.’
      • ‘If you are more conservative and don't follow fashion trends, opt for a classic suit.’
      • ‘She loves pink for what it represents: femininity, elegance and classic style.’
      • ‘The fit is more predictable, thanks to consumer research that has simplified most of the women's pants designs into modern and classic styles.’
      • ‘The white fur shawl and the light brown loose trousers blend beautifully with her simple, classic hair style.’
      • ‘For evening, her navy tuxedo jacket has satin trim on the collar, pocket and sleeves, and is a modern twist on a classic design.’
      • ‘This time around he went for being modern, by encompassing modern styles and techniques with Chanel's intricate classic designs.’
      • ‘Pair neutral pants with a classic shirt color like navy blue, and your belt can be either brown or black.’
      • ‘It's a very classic design which is simple and honest.’
      • ‘These designs take a classic style and make it even more sophisticated.’
      • ‘A necktie is so classic it is almost a joke, but it doesn't have to be!’
      simple, elegant, understated, uncluttered, restrained
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  • 2Remarkably and instructively typical.

    ‘Hamlet is the classic example of a tragedy’
    ‘I had all the classic symptoms of flu’
    • ‘Many patients don't have classic symptoms, however.’
    • ‘Each subsequent rainy season left a slowly growing number of locals stricken with the classic symptoms of fever and nausea.’
    • ‘Let's look at the classic symptoms of the passive-aggressive syndrome.’
    • ‘Runny nose, sore throat, dry cough, headache, aching muscles and a high fever are the classic symptoms of influenza.’
    • ‘He developed all the classic symptoms but not all at once.’
    • ‘Random glucose testing is easy and inexpensive; elevated levels in patients with classic symptoms should be confirmed by a second test.’
    • ‘Some heart attacks have the classic symptoms you see on television or in the movies - where someone clutches their chest and writhes in excruciating pain.’
    • ‘They are the classic cartoon character archetypes - the trio of the nice guy, the angry guy, and the dumb guy.’
    • ‘It is for the classic flu symptoms of dizziness, weakness, and fatigue.’
    • ‘Wednesday night was a classic case of the symptom which has hampered the team for as long as I can remember - even when I was playing.’
    • ‘One classic example of the so-called fiscal drag applies to benefits paid by companies to their employees.’
    • ‘You're looking at the classic symptoms that the dog demonstrates.’
    • ‘I could not think of a more classic case where psychology was needed as a strategy to induce learning.’
    • ‘The classic allergy symptoms such as stuffiness, eczema, wheezing, and itching may be absent, yet cognition and behavior remain affected.’
    • ‘When those patients are evaluated, almost half of them have a normal pumping function of the heart, despite having all the classic signs and symptoms of heart failure.’
    • ‘Fortunately in Cambridge there are several of the former and one classic example of the latter.’
    • ‘In newborn and small infants, the classic symptoms may be harder to detect.’
    • ‘Doctors failed to properly investigate a woman with a family history of heart disease who died within a year of showing classic symptoms of a heart condition, it was alleged yesterday.’
    • ‘We may have the classic symptoms of the workaholic - the compulsion to spend hours away from home, the misplaced feeling of virtue - but none of this is proof we are accomplishing anything.’
    • ‘The report claims the retail pharmacy market exhibits a number of the classic symptoms of potential market failure.’
    typical, archetypal, quintessential, vintage
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noun

  • 1A work of art of recognized and established value.

    ‘his books have become classics’
    • ‘So, he started to read Western literary classics.’
    • ‘The latter, in fact, has become an enduring American classic.’
    • ‘What make this movie such a classic is its entertainment value plus its originality.’
    • ‘Interestingly, it is not the bestsellers but classics and literary books that find place at these counters.’
    • ‘His repertoire spans traditional pop classics and folk music.’
    • ‘Her works are widely read and taught and bear the hallmarks of enduring American classics.’
    • ‘It's not just current movies - classics and cult films are available.’
    • ‘So I have my own peculiar view of modern classics of American literature.’
    • ‘In 1883, he published Treasure Island, a much beloved children's classic.’
    • ‘The music has a cinematic quality which conjures up images of film noir classics.’
    • ‘Ideas and concepts in the book met with vigorous opposition, but today the book is recognized as a classic that was far ahead of its time.’
    • ‘Students at Manchester University no longer need to thumb through dusty texts when reading classics of English literature.’
    • ‘In the process, they offer up the definitive home video version of this horror classic.’
    • ‘But it still has the power to enchant, and is a true modern classic.’
    • ‘Think of the recognised classics of American cinema and they seem organic, inviolate.’
    • ‘Well represented on the various top 100 lists, it has remained a timeless classic.’
    • ‘The film was an instant cult classic, and rumours of a sequel have floated around the Internet for years.’
    • ‘Imagine if we could all value each other as much as we value the classics of literature.’
    • ‘The movie went on to become a timeless classic, popular around the world.’
    • ‘Their program of four operas includes three recognized classics and one new work that has already won many important prizes in China.’
    definitive example, model, epitome, paradigm, exemplar, prototype
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A garment of a simple, elegant, and long-lasting style.
      • ‘While trends are instantly recognizable by length, pattern, or decoration, classics transcend time with their cut, style, and fabric.’
      • ‘Keep in mind that frames consisting of a simple square, rectangle, oval or round shapes are classics that can work with everything.’
      • ‘The stones of jewelry have also changed over the decades though some classics remain constant.’
      • ‘As for colors, blue is the most popular color for jeans and will remain a timeless classic.’
      • ‘The diverse sectors of the fair covered the gamut of the all menswear has to offer, from the classics to the avant-garde to sportswear all at demonstrating the peak of quality.’
      • ‘It is one of their classics, they always have it in my size, it comes in a lot of colors, and I can order it without trying it on.’
      • ‘Don't hesitate to purchase solid pattern suits because they will always remain classics.’
      • ‘Keep in mind, however, that they'll never go out of style because they are pretty much classics.’
      • ‘Buy only natural fabrics, and start with the classics - plain white and blue shirts, black, grey, and navy suits, blue blazer, wool trousers.’
      • ‘The various pieces defined a lifestyle but their innate functionality outside of the rural setting makes them potential modern classics that work just as well in the city.’
      • ‘High quality clothing lasts longer and classics don't lose their style.’
      • ‘Giddy up into the spirit of the west with timeless, rugged classics rather than hokey duds.’
      • ‘The following accessories are also classics, and you'll be able to wear them for many years to come.’
      • ‘Black is a timeless classic that suits every person and occasion.’
      • ‘Instead, opt for solid colors such as plain whites, blacks and grays; they're classics and can easily be matched with the rest of your wardrobe.’
      • ‘Soft and natural made from the most futuristic materials possible, this year's trend gives way to the super modern as well as the modernized return of the sixties classics.’
      • ‘From the classics and the power ties, to the coolest retro neckties around, dress for success with these 12 options.’
      • ‘Traditional classics (we don't call them conservative) are still dominant, but styles that are trendier have a definite place.’
      • ‘It is a classic hunting jacket that has been around for decades and is as good as ever.’
      • ‘The Burberry trenchcoat is a style classic which has influenced other manufacturers.’
    2. 1.2 A thing which is memorable and a very good example of its kind.
      ‘he's hoping that tomorrow's game will be a classic’
      • ‘With this in mind, we talk about portraits and view examples of classics.’
      • ‘Certain classics stand out in both media - but it would be stretching it to say they had a separate influence on my opinions.’
      • ‘The examples are a mixture of classics from the past, as well as new examples.’
      • ‘Crowds flocked to the dockside to admire the fine array of classics, which included elegant Triumphs and the rather rugged armed vehicles driven by the 14 Signal Regiment.’
      • ‘The duel is a cautionary classic as well as a textbook example of strategy.’
      • ‘The waffle-lined basket is a comfortable classic and easy to keep looking fresh, as the lining can be removed and put through a hot wash whenever it starts to look tired and grubby.’
      • ‘A fur-and-pearls clientele come to be comforted with well-cooked classics such as tortellini al tartufo.’
      • ‘Football's most elemental rivalry was providing the defining classic of the genre.’
      • ‘The menus are a modern take on comfort classics.’
      • ‘The sad truth is that this doesn't dig up some underappreciated geniuses or lost classics of Northeastern counterculture.’
      • ‘His chicken curry, for example, is a retro classic made with Granny Smith apples, chicken stock and desiccated coconut.’
      • ‘Modern cruise ships would not win prizes for good looks, particularly when compared to elegant pre-war classics such as the Queen Mary or the Normandie.’
  • 2A school subject that involves the study of ancient Greek and Latin literature, philosophy, and history.

    • ‘His Oxford doctorate in Classics, earned studying Latin ghost stories and adultery tales, is of little relevance to this.’
    • ‘He graduated with honours in Classics from Melbourne University despite leaving Ormond after a row.’
    • ‘French, German, Latin and Classics are offered by the school supported by a variety of trips abroad to encourage learning new skills.’
    • ‘He was educated at Malvern College and University College Oxford on a Classics scholarship.’
    • ‘I transferred out to go to Saint John's College, where I immersed myself in the Classics and Ancient Greek, then I went back to Marlboro and studied Literature and Philosophy.’
    • ‘The book grew out of a lecture course that I delivered over several years in the late 1980s and early 1990s to final-year undergraduate students in the Faculty of Classics at Cambridge University.’
    • ‘The author is Research Fellow at the Centre for Classics and Archaeological Studies, University of Melbourne.’
    • ‘I was an English major for a year before I decided to study Classics.’
    • ‘A little under seven years ago I left a doctorate in Classics that I'd been undertaking at Bristol University.’
    • ‘And, as every arts student knows, scientists are nothing more than sullen interlopers: Classics was studied here several centuries before physics, proving that medieval monks knew what was important.’
    • ‘That aspect of his career began when he was just six years old, and his mother was studying Sophocles' Antigone as part of a university Classics course.’
    • ‘The Linguistics and Classics departments, for example, both of whom have three or fewer full time faculty, will most likely be unable to make the adjustment.’
    • ‘It suited a society that wanted a select few to pursue the life of the mind, through immersing themselves in such fusty subjects as Classics or philosophy, while everybody else did something less useless instead.’
    • ‘Social Science was her favourite subject and she hated Classics.’
    • ‘We are not looking, then, at aspirational youngsters being given a leg-up to study Classics, or any such romantic nonsense.’
    • ‘He was a Harvard undergrad, a classics major.’
    • ‘He taught Classics at Birmingham University, 1929-36.’
    1. 2.1the classics The works of ancient Greek and Latin writers and philosophers.
      • ‘As a young man he enjoyed skiing in Aspen, Colo. and spent many summers traveling in England and Italy to consult with other scholars in the Classics.’
      • ‘His own education was scholarly and he could read Latin and was familiar with the classics.’
      • ‘In this sphere, as always, he was indebted to the classics, but the new research also showed that he was paying careful attention to contemporary events.’
      • ‘Also the way he approaches the classics, indeed, the way he approaches all of history, is examined afresh.’
      • ‘He was an ardent student of the classics, especially of Plato, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius, a devotee of liberty of thought, and an amateur of art.’
      • ‘Stripped of his offices in 1688, he returned with success to the theatre, and began a brilliant series of translations from the classics, particularly Virgil's Aeneid and The Georgics.’
      • ‘Between 1660 and 1789, the Latin language, and the Latin literary classics, remained the basis of secondary education.’
      • ‘He was not especially intelligent, indeed he was quite unintellectual, lacking a deep understanding of law, of the classics, of theology.’
      • ‘It's become very unfashionable to read the Classics, the Greeks and the Romans, and their literature.’
      • ‘He had a good grounding in the classics and became well versed in Greek and Latin.’
      • ‘He had also read all the Latin classics, which he placed into four divisions: historians, poets, orators and philosophers.’
      • ‘He was in one sense a classical, Renaissance playwright, but his was a classicism that used and abused the classics rather than felt itself hidebound by them.’
      • ‘As a reaction to the Middle Ages, in the early renaissance, there was a strong focus on a classical education consisting of Greek, Latin, the classics, and art.’
      • ‘One of the major characteristics of this Renaissance was the rediscovery of numerous Latin classics.’
      • ‘This was a strategic way of legitimizing their own ideas, but it also reflected a genuine respect for many of the insights of the classics.’
      • ‘The philosophes of the Enlightenment were familiar with all of these arguments, trained as they were in the classics.’
      • ‘Even so, solid grounding in the Latin classics was still regarded as the essential foundation of a superior education.’
      • ‘The role of the public school was to educate potential political leaders and gentlemen, and the bulk of a public school curriculum reflected the liberal arts through the classics.’
      • ‘This prevailing linguistic approach to the Classics meant that the study of Ancient History was well nigh ignored in the Public Schools.’
      • ‘Scholars should know the Classics and be familiar with the literary collections written by Chinese scholars because the Chinese have a superior culture.’
    2. 2.2dated A scholar of ancient Greek and Latin.
  • 3A major sports tournament or competition, as in golf or tennis.

    ‘dozens of celebrity golfers attended the Bob Hope Desert Classic’
    • ‘Austin Peay won the Top of the World Classic over South Florida and Colorado.’
    • ‘There is a Golf Classic in Cloverhill organised for Saturday, July 10.’
    • ‘So the Classics and the World Cup races are your target this year?’
    • ‘They also have a Dubai Desert Tennis, Snooker, Cricket, Soccer and even Table Tennis Classic.’
    • ‘Holmes won the English Championship and Jebb won the Lakeland Classics.’
    • ‘Foxford's Hope House Golf Classic was held on Monday, September 3rd, at Galway Bay Golf and Country club.’
    • ‘Monday there was a large turnout at the Galway Bay Golf and Country Club for a Golf Classic.’
    • ‘The annual Billy Heffron Chamber Golf Classic is taking place this year on Saturday the 24th of September in Ballina Golf Club.’
    • ‘Please do not forget the Golf Classic at Ardattin Golf Course.’
    • ‘The club will hold their Golf Classic at Borris Golf Club on Friday, June 26.’
    • ‘Below are the results of the Crossmolina Deel Rovers Golf Classic held in Ballina Golf Club on Saturday, May 22.’
    • ‘The Sir Alex Ferguson Golf Classic and Gala Dinner takes place on Friday, July 19.’
    • ‘The annual Gerry Gaughan Memorial Sarsfields Golf Classic takes place on Saturday, June 5th.’
    • ‘The Abbey Community College Parents Association will hold a Golf Classic in Waterford Golf Club this Friday May 6th.’
    • ‘The 11 th Gallaudet University Biennial Congressional Basketball Classic will take place tonight.’
    • ‘The annual Dunhill Golf Classic will be held at Waterford Castle on Friday, 12 th August.’
    • ‘A Poker Classic will be held on Sunday.’
    • ‘The Golf Classic is in aid of Charlestown Christmas Lights.’
    • ‘New Mexico travels to Texas Tech to play in the Hispanic College Fund Football Classic.’
    • ‘But the Wildcats melted in a season-opening 41-7 loss at Penn State in the Kickoff Classic.’

Usage

Note that classic means ‘typical, excellent as an example, timeless,’ as in John Ford directed many classic Westerns, and classical means ‘relating to Greek or Roman antiquity,’ as in the museum was built in the classical style. Great art is considered classic, not classical, unless it is created in the forms of antiquity. Classical music is one exception to this rule, being formal music adhering to certain stylistic principles of the late 18th century. A classical education exposes a student to classical literature, history, and languages (especially Latin and Greek), but the study of Greek and Latin languages and their literatures is also referred to as the classics

Origin

Early 17th century: from French classique or Latin classicus ‘belonging to a class or division’, later ‘of the highest class’, from classis (see class).

Pronunciation

classic

/ˈklasik//ˈklæsɪk/