Definition of civil court in English:

civil court

noun

  • A court dealing with noncriminal cases.

    • ‘In a civil case, there is a lot to be said for that proposition, and generally speaking, that is the law in the civil courts.’
    • ‘These courts became and remain civil courts of limited jurisdiction.’
    • ‘He has filed lawsuits in civil court to stop the scam.’
    • ‘The answer is that the very same public policy that causes the civil courts to refuse the claim points in a quite different direction in considering a criminal offence.’
    • ‘It is one thing to say that the powers of the civil courts can be invoked to enforce the criminal law.’
    • ‘Medical malpractice cases are tort cases brought in civil court, in which either the plaintiffs or the defendants prevail.’
    • ‘The situation in civil court was mixed, and dire in some states.’
    • ‘Such a submission is a feature of life in the criminal courts but a rare occurrence in the civil courts.’
    • ‘This action provoked an immediate response from Congress, questioning the authority of the President to bar access to the civil courts.’
    • ‘The matter is to be dealt with at the next civil court assignment list.’
    • ‘As for civil cases, children have to go to the adult civil court or the economic court.’
    • ‘It asks whether cameras should be allowed in Crown Court, magistrates' courts, the civil courts, appeal courts and others such as tribunals.’
    • ‘While workers will be able to uphold their rights under contract law in the civil courts, he doesn't see this as a viable or accessible option for most workers.’
    • ‘Indeed, the evidence discloses that the advice from the township throughout to the plaintiffs was that they would have to take legal action in the civil courts.’
    • ‘That is what a theory of civil harms is for, and such torts are addressed not in criminal but civil courts, where the plaintiff, not the government, collects the monetary damages.’
    • ‘Persons who have grounds for an action for unlawful arrest or malicious prosecution have a remedy in the civil courts against the person or authority responsible.’
    • ‘It came not in criminal court but in civil court, where the standards of evidence are much lower than in criminal court.’
    • ‘Supposedly, the parties to a case could decide whether to take it to a civil court or a religious court, but, if the parties disagreed, whose voice would prevail?’
    • ‘As several readers have rightly pointed out, this is for criminal courts only and civil courts work on a ‘balance of probabilities’.’
    • ‘These claims are duked out in civil court rather than family court, and they must be based on the individual state's contract laws.’