Definition of citadel in English:

citadel

noun

  • A fortress, typically on high ground, protecting or dominating a city.

    • ‘Peter's army stormed the citadel and sacked the city, killing several thousand inhabitants and local Byzantine troops.’
    • ‘After the initial skirmishes of the battle, the French withdrew to their massive citadel.’
    • ‘The most controversial proposal is for a three-storey museum under the Forbidden City, a sprawling citadel dating from the Ming Dynasty.’
    • ‘The great city walls were not breached until 146, and it took a week of street fighting for the Romans to work their way to the citadel.’
    • ‘Nine of the citadel's original fourteen towers still stand, named after the guilds that raised the money to build and maintain them.’
    • ‘It was only when he had almost reached the citadel that he leapt on his horse and rode off.’
    • ‘Victory eluded the British for three months, until Wolfe successfully landed men on the Plains of Abraham above the citadel.’
    • ‘He actually broke into the city, but could not take the citadel.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, the Palamidi Fortress, a citadel dominating the town, is worth a visit.’
    • ‘A deep moat that surrounds the citadel has kept it from being damaged.’
    • ‘Lying at the town's highest point, the site resembles a small citadel, hovering above its surroundings and visible from the streets below.’
    • ‘The city fell immediately, but the garrison held out in the citadel.’
    • ‘They soon grew tired of the siege, bound their commander, and lowered him down the walls of the citadel to a summary execution.’
    • ‘The walled citadels in some early cities developed into elaborate palisades, walls, and moats to protect the multitude of Iron Age and medieval cities throughout much of the country.’
    • ‘The city fell immediately, but the citadel held out.’
    • ‘Each city was laid out on a grid plan with a high citadel and a lower city of domestic dwellings.’
    • ‘To this end 10,000 troops were quartered on the land, in great citadels at Leith, Ayr, and Perth, and a score of smaller forts.’
    • ‘We drove two hundred kilometers to Bam, a sprawling walled city and citadel begun two thousand years ago by the Parthians.’
    • ‘At this point the palace-organized economy seems to have ceased, though parts of the citadel continued to be occupied until about 1050 bc.’
    • ‘The royal citadel, to strengthen the defences, was begun in 1666 and the dockyard at Devonport was developed in William III's reign.’
    fortress, fort, stronghold, fortification, castle, burg, keep, tower, donjon, bunker
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Origin

Mid 16th century: from French citadelle, or from Italian cittadella, based on Latin civitas ‘city’ (see city).

Pronunciation