Main definitions of chunk in English

: chunk1chunk2

chunk1

noun

  • 1A thick, solid piece of something.

    ‘huge chunks of masonry littered the street’
    • ‘The stone cracked under the pressure and sent chunks falling to the stone floor, cracking it as well.’
    • ‘I was flung out of control, and was narrowly missed a huge chunk of rock.’
    • ‘Though few snowflakes fell, the ground was covered in nearly two feet of snow, most of which had frozen solid into large chunks of ice.’
    • ‘Yesterday, cranes lifted heavy chunks of concrete, metal beams and giant buckets of broken building materials.’
    • ‘The road was so slippery and there were thick chunks of ice on it.’
    • ‘Moist chunks of carrot cake and a fridgeful of ice-cream ensure that your tastebuds, at least, need never face reality again.’
    • ‘We said nothing as we stepped over the shards of roof slate and chunks of plaster and pieces of smashed doors.’
    • ‘Huge chunks of stone, honed by creative hands, form elaborate gothic doorways and windows.’
    • ‘The pieces of rabbit were brown and almost crispy on the outside, encasing solid chunks of nicely roasted meat.’
    • ‘Garlicky melted Brie with pineapple chunks might sound slightly freaky but we defy you to resist another mouthful.’
    • ‘A metal fence post was found nearby and it has been used to chip chunks of stone from the other pillars and the monument itself.’
    • ‘Where the road had been cut through a rise, great chunks of sandstone were exposed, thick pieces, tawny as the landscape.’
    • ‘Ben swallowed a big chunk of meat and cheese.’
    • ‘The ceiling was breaking and chunks were falling to the floor below.’
    • ‘The salad was a sad little remnant of a 1980s salad made mostly of iceberg lettuce, thick chunks of onion and thicker chunks of cucumber.’
    • ‘I like my cake to have some chunks of biscuit through it, so I don't crush them all completely, though if you want a smoother consistency cake, you can.’
    • ‘The thick meaty sauce with chunks of beef and pork was delicious.’
    • ‘This assortment of raw fish chunks arranged over delicious sesame-seeded and seaweed-laced rice can be a way for a chef to strut his stuff.’
    • ‘My soup came in a good deep bowl, with a chunk of bread.’
    • ‘Thread two metal skewers with 100g steak, cut into cubes, along with chunks of yellow pepper, onion, cherry tomatoes and mushrooms.’
    • ‘Rescue workers and survivors clawed away at the rubble, passing chunks of concrete and bricks along a line.’
    • ‘Up above her head was a big huge chunk of concrete that must have been at three tons.’
    lump, hunk, wedge, block, slab, square, nugget, nub, brick, cube, bar, cake, loaf
    knob, ball
    piece, portion, bit
    mass
    wodge
    gob
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in singular] An amount or part of something.
      ‘fuel takes a large chunk of their small income’
      • ‘Encourage students to complete assignments in small, manageable chunks.’
      • ‘As expected, band practice takes up a nice, hefty chunk of their time.’
      • ‘‘What they are losing is a chunk of feature material which is what makes it distinctively Scottish,’ said one experienced producer.’
      • ‘He also attributes a chunk of his creativity to his mom, who took Paul scavenging for vintage goods and bought him his first sewing machine.’
      • ‘The cosmetics chain, which now operates some 200 retail stores worldwide, is one of the companies making a play for a chunk of the market.’
      • ‘Rail enthusiasts with a cool £1.5m to spare could find themselves owning their own railway - as well as a chunk of steam history.’
      • ‘Michael has given them a chunk of capital amounting to about £500,000 between them.’
      • ‘Talking of which, I'm heading to Athens at the crack of dawn to get a first look at preparations for the Athens Olympics, where I'll be spending a chunk of my Summer.’
      • ‘You might also seek out funds in which the managers have invested a large chunk of their own money.’
      • ‘Did we trust Brown and Roberts when they came in here and took a big chunk of that money?’
      • ‘Even before households decide what to do with their federal tax breaks, cash-strapped states and localities are claiming a chunk of that change.’
      • ‘Sykes last night pledged his support for the Party and will spend a chunk of his fortune promoting their election campaign.’
      • ‘The advent of the private finance initiative has made trust managements even more conscious of the need to keep a lid on pay, because a chunk of their budget goes to the companies that build and maintain the buildings.’
      • ‘Five years ago, it introduced personal social security accounts: giving workers the power to invest a chunk of their retirement in a choice of approved funds.’
      • ‘The DJ spent a sizeable chunk of his three-hour morning slot yesterday talking about the size of his hangover.’
      • ‘A chunk of the cash has already been ear-marked for continuing work on updating the West Coast main line along with cross city links in Edinburgh and a new rail service to Glasgow Airport.’
      • ‘As part of the deal, the Rangers syndicate got a sizable chunk of land in addition to the stadium.’
      • ‘His divorce settlement took a sizeable chunk out of his fortune.’
      • ‘I just need a chunk of time to write up a detailed review.’
      • ‘It has also decided to spend a chunk of its capital spending allowance on repaying its £190 million debt, which started to build up in the 1960s.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]North American
  • 1 Divide (something) into chunks.

    ‘chunk four pounds of pears’
    • ‘For his beef empanadas he uses meat that is ground, rather than chunked, before it is mixed with tomatoes, onions, sweet pepper, and paprika.’
    • ‘An equilibrium culture was obtained by chunking a block of agar containing worms from an old plate onto a new plate seeded with bacteria once every 3-4 days over a period of 1 month.’
    • ‘The ground and chunked beef products are fully cooked, creating a broth and separating the fat from the beef.’
    • ‘Start with 2 cups of sliced or chunked firm radishes.’
    • ‘In addition to chunking time, historians also need to chunk space, focusing on specific areas of the world as well as on specific periods.’
    1. 1.1 (in psychology or linguistic analysis) group together (connected items or words) so that they can be stored or processed as single concepts.
      • ‘George Miller, a pioneer in the study of cognitive psychology and memory, suggested that this ‘something more’ often consists of the process of chunking.’
      • ‘We know, for example, as George Miller told us, the limit of the number of items that we can easily remember, and we know from that research that chunking information into larger units improves memory.’
      • ‘These phrases are the building blocks of language, and we naturally chunk sentences into phrase blocks just as we chunk visual images into objects.’
      • ‘Information that is chunked and linked is easier to remember, and to learn with songs and patterns.’
      • ‘He obviously couldn't chunk even Spanish words into pronounceable blocks.’

Origin

Late 17th century: apparently an alteration of chuck.

Pronunciation:

chunk

/CHəNGk/

Main definitions of chunk in English

: chunk1chunk2

chunk2

verb

[NO OBJECT]North American
  • Move with or make a muffled, metallic sound.

    ‘the door chunked behind them’
    • ‘The door chunked behind them.’
    • ‘I wasn't used to the heavy shoes and this became evident when my leg flew out sideways and chunked into a young lady's shin.’
    • ‘The waterwheel distantly chunked and gurgled.’
    • ‘I heard the air brakes of the truck hiss as the driver chunked into gear.’

Origin

Late 19th century: imitative.

Pronunciation:

chunk

/CHəNGk/