Definition of chrysanthemum in English:

chrysanthemum

noun

  • 1A popular plant of the daisy family, having brightly colored ornamental flowers and existing in many cultivated varieties.

    • ‘Those inspired by the Far East included stylized water lilies, chrysanthemums, peonies, prunus blossoms, wisteria, and wild roses, as well as birds and insects.’
    • ‘Daises, lilies, tulips, chrysanthemums, petunias, and hyacinths also blossomed.’
    • ‘Even though there are hundreds of good varieties of chrysanthemums available, the advice of experts in various regions resulted in this short list of the most outstanding or noteworthy.’
    • ‘Stake and support dahlias, gladioli, chrysanthemums and other top-heavy border plants.’
    • ‘Choose perennials and bulbs that are quick to form intricate root systems, such as chrysanthemums, violets, daffodils and creeping phlox.’
    • ‘For most, the presence of flowers such as roses, peonies, chrysanthemums, lilies, irises and calendulas for instance represents an aesthetic uplifting of spirit.’
    • ‘Planted along with traditional peonies, irises and chrysanthemums, are lupines, veronicas and Canterbury bells, a contemporary feature rarely seen in Japanese gardens.’
    • ‘By using new growing methods which are similar to cultivating chrysanthemums in pots, it is now possible to achieve a longer season for top quality potted dahlias.’
    • ‘The corporation parks department created displays of autumn flowers, including chrysanthemums, Michaelmas daisies, geraniums, salvias and primuli.’
    • ‘Vegetable harvest coincides with bright autumn foliage, chrysanthemums, asters and sedum.’
    • ‘If you have a history of allergy to daisies, ragweed, marigolds, chrysanthemums, or related plants, you may be more at risk of having an allergic reaction to echinacea.’
    • ‘The main crops produced were roses, mimosas, carnations and chrysanthemums, as ornamental non-edible plants, and tomato, lettuce and basil, as edible ones.’
    • ‘Keep asters and chrysanthemums more compact by pinching a couple of inches off their growing tips when they reach 12 inches tall in spring and again in mid-summer.’
    • ‘Many flowers are edible, the most common culinary varieties being calendula, chrysanthemum, daylily, nasturtium, pansy, violet and zucchini.’
    • ‘I went upstairs on the roof and sat among the potted plants, among the violets and chrysanthemums and marigolds and daisies.’
    • ‘Orchids, anthuriums, chrysanthemums, gladiolus, lilies, cut flowers and dry flowers were a big draw among visitors.’
    • ‘Major festivals attract huge crowds, and famous sites for admiring plum and cherry blossoms, irises, azaleas, chrysanthemums, and the bright leaves of fall draw many visitors.’
    • ‘There, under palm trees and bamboo, grew huge chrysanthemums and peonies, as well as wisteria.’
    • ‘Cosmos and chrysanthemums, along with marigolds, may repel Mexican bean beetles from beans.’
    • ‘You no doubt have heard of cloth houses being used to grow many plants commercially, in particular chrysanthemums, asters, snapdragons, and occasionally roses.’
    1. 1.1A flower or flowering stem of the chrysanthemum plant.
      • ‘Hundreds of wreaths, mainly made up of seasonal flowers such as carnations, chrysanthemums, lilies and gerbera were laid in his memory’
      • ‘In this study a mathematical description has been developed for both hydraulic conductivity and conduit length distribution as functions of height in a chrysanthemum stem.’
      • ‘Generally speaking, cut-flower prices, including lilies, orchids and chrysanthemums, are up 5 percent to 10 percent.’
      • ‘Sunflowers, zinnias, cosmos, chrysanthemums, even roses all bloom in the fall and make terrific bouquets.’
      • ‘Choose flowers with full heads like dahlias, carnations, chrysanthemums and daffodils.’
      • ‘Flowers were also very scarce, narcissus and chrysanthemums being the chief varieties at twopence and threepence per bunch.’
      • ‘Mrs Robinson said: ‘We will have a selection of white and red roses, chrysanthemums, lilies and pink flowers called proteas.’’
      • ‘The platform was banked with chrysanthemums and firs and a Christmas tree and illuminated castle were dominant features.’
      • ‘New chrysanthemum cuttings will produce 2.5-centimetre roots in 10 to 12 days when they are then ready to be planted out in growing beds.’
      • ‘The centre was filled with very bright pink chrysanthemums, silver sisal was placed among the flowers to give it a misty appearance.’
      • ‘Anemones, chrysanthemums, marigolds, pansies, peonies, and roses are best suited to microwave drying, but small, finely textured or delicate flowers are not.’
      • ‘Growing commercial cut flowers like rose, chrysanthemum, anthurium and orchids under protected cultivation especially in greenhouses/poly houses or shade nets is a viable profession for farmers and commercial entrepreneurs.’
      • ‘A square pewter container was next, containing black dogwood stems, large green chrysanthemums, white lilies, the palest green flowers surrounded by senecio and rosemary, and yellow cymbidium orchids cascading over the edge.’
      • ‘Water lilies should be available at florists this month, but you can use pink Gerbera daisies, chrysanthemums, or dahlias instead.’
      • ‘She carried a bouquet of light yellow roses, large daisies, chrysanthemums and blue campanulas.’
      • ‘Last year I potted up a bunch of cut chrysanthemums that had rooted in the vase.’
      • ‘In Germany, Calla lilies and heather are funeral flowers, while chrysanthemums are inappropriate in Belgium, Italy and Switzerland for the same reason.’
      • ‘The flowers she has chosen - white and sunshine yellow chrysanthemums, red anthuriums, pink ginger lilies and Birds of Paradise in burnt orange - add a touch of radiance to the show.’
      • ‘So, I parked my trolley beside the big display and started pulling out bunches of daisies and chrysanthemums, each of them guaranteed to last for fourteen days.’
      • ‘The pillars were adorned in an exceedingly tasteful manner with vases of various flowers including dahlias, sunflowers and chrysanthemums and long trails of ivy and coloured creeper.’

Origin

(originally denoting the corn marigold): from Latin, from Greek khrusanthemon, from khrusos gold + anthemon flower.

Pronunciation:

chrysanthemum

/kriˈsanTHəməm/