Definition of chrysalis in English:

chrysalis

(also chrysalid)

noun

  • 1A quiescent insect pupa, especially of a butterfly or moth.

    • ‘In this nonfeeding condition it is called a pupa or chrysalis.’
    • ‘Images of chrysalises and butterflies suggest regeneration for the survivors.’
    • ‘A pupa is an insect in the intermediate stage between larva and adult; the term chrysalis is used of a butterfly or moth in this intermediate stage.’
    • ‘Tradition, properly understood, is not only the chrysalis; it's the butterfly.’
    • ‘If you see no monarch eggs, caterpillars or chrysalises, trim the plants back now and treat with jets of water or a little insecticidal soap.’
    • ‘A chrysalis is the pupa stage of a butterfly - a protective covering for the transformation from caterpillar into winged insect.’
    • ‘But while I was up there, I found a whole other use for guttering I hadn't known about: chrysalises tucked away beneath the overhang, which was a bit sad, since it's almost impossible to paint round them.’
    • ‘The only chrysalises we eat in Korea are from silkworms.’
    • ‘The effect is that of a chrysalis in a cocoon struggling to get free and, at points, of a body emerging from its death shroud.’
    • ‘Thousands of live chrysalises enter the country every week to supply butterfly houses.’
    • ‘Milkweed, in its many varieties, serves as the sole host plant for the monarch's life cycle, from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis.’
    • ‘They will turn into chrysalises and, after a few weeks, into butterflies or moths.’
    • ‘Alice reminds the Caterpillar that it will be strange when he changes to a chrysalis and then into a butterfly, but the Caterpillar disagrees.’
    • ‘This means that their eggs, chrysalises or larvae are likely to be in or near your yard during the non-gardening months.’
    • ‘Don't tidy up too much in the fall; whether a butterfly overwinters as egg, caterpillar, chrysalis or adult, it needs a place to hibernate during the cold months.’
    • ‘Unlike the mopane worm, which over-winters in the chrysalis or pupa stage, Thongolifha overwinters in the adult stage.’
    • ‘There are at least seven chrysalises, dozens of caterpillars in all sizes and one egg.’
    • ‘At Samson's farm, a Kipepeo representative shows up every Monday and Thursday morning to collect his chrysalises, which range in color from mottled brown to lime green with flecks of metallic gold.’
    • ‘Display houses pay up to $2.50 for one chrysalis, of which about a dollar will go to Samson.’
    • ‘To attack a Beethoven sketch is brazenness in extreme, for the magical transformation from his rough draft to end product would be like an unknowing child trying to guess what the chrysalis or tadpole might become.’
    1. 1.1The hard outer case of this, especially after being discarded.
      • ‘The leaves are high in vitamins A and C, preparing the caterpillars for the chrysalis.’
      • ‘The title may refer to a process, as when a butterfly emerges from the chrysalis.’
      • ‘An inflexible innate preference for the color blue, for instance, could mean death for a butterfly that emerged from its chrysalis in a meadow filled with yellow and pink flowers.’
      • ‘Nijhout showed that before the caterpillar retires into its chrysalis to transform into a butterfly, the position of the spots on the future wings has been established.’
      • ‘Then, over the course of several weeks, the children watched the caterpillars grow bigger, spin their chrysalises, and emerge as butterflies.’
      • ‘After feeding, caterpillars pupate in a chrysalis, then transform into beautiful butterflies.’
      • ‘Some are now encased in chrysalises hanging From the milkweed plants, waiting to emerge as orange-and-black beauties and continue their journey.’
      • ‘It's exquisitely photographed, with intimate shots of flora and fauna, and a particularly mesmerizing sequence in which a rare butterfly emerges from its chrysalis.’
      • ‘It makes a chrysalis or cocoon and then emerges as a beautiful butterfly.’
      • ‘As the dancers broke through like butterflies from a chrysalis, the fabric hung from them limply, like some remnant of an earlier life stage.’
      • ‘A determined butterfly struggled for release from its chrysalis as raindrops fell, tearing holes in its unfolding wings.’
      • ‘Once it has finished eating, the caterpillar envelops itself in a chrysalis.’
      • ‘After a Harris' checkerspot emerges from its chrysalis, it feeds on nectar from a wide variety of flowers.’
      • ‘The new spectacularly rises from the old like a butterfly emerging from a chrysalis.’
      • ‘Release the butterfly where it was captured as soon as it emerges from its chrysalis.’
      • ‘Only then do they desist, becoming immobile in a hard chrysalis suspended from a leaf or stem of the larval host plant until emerging as an adult butterfly.’
      • ‘After two to four weeks, caterpillars envelop themselves in jade-green chrysalises, where they stay for 10 to 14 days.’
      • ‘Closely related to each other, this kind of photography will show such things as the development of a flower, or the butterfly emerging from the chrysalis.’
      • ‘It appeared to be drying off its wings after emerging from its chrysalis and was happy to pose for a picture before flying off.’
      • ‘To demonstrate that monarchs have an internal clock and that the clock is set by daylight, the researchers examined the time of day when adult monarchs emerge from their hard-shelled pupa, called the chrysalis.’
    2. 1.2A preparatory or transitional state.
      ‘she emerged from the chrysalis of self-conscious adolescence’
      • ‘For example he writes, ‘Ideally, marriage also enhances the life of the child, by providing it with a chrysalis of nurture and love.’’
      • ‘Indeed, the next day we're ready to emerge from our chrysalis for some shopping in town.’
      • ‘Metaphysics bursts the chrysalis of metaphor.’
      • ‘Already, the gross excrescence that is slowly emerging from its chrysalis is provoking horror among local residents, as its impact on a once gracious townscape becomes evident.’
      • ‘My surroundings were only a chrysalis for me to burst out of and become something else.’
      • ‘It was as though the dance had not yet fully emerged from a too-cool chrysalis.’
      • ‘In that way, Misery Is A Butterfly is a secret that has emerged from its chrysalis into a bloom that may just claim its rightful accolades.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin chrysal(l)is, chrysal(l)id-, from Greek khrusallis, from khrusos gold (because of the gold color or metallic sheen of the pupae of some species).

Pronunciation:

chrysalis

/ˈkrisələs/