Main definitions of chine in English

: chine1chine2chine3

chine1

noun

  • 1A backbone, especially that of an animal as it appears in a cut of meat.

    • ‘Preliminary fat thickness was measured perpendicular to the longissimus from the chine bone, at a point three-fourths of the lateral length of the longissimus for each carcass.’
    • ‘Don't let your butcher touch those chine or "feather" bones.’
    • ‘You'll probably need to special order this roast from the butcher; be sure to ask for the chine bone to be removed.’
    • ‘Souse, griskins, blade-bones, thigh-bones, spare-ribs, chines, belly-pieces, cheeks, all coming into use one after the other, and the last of the latter not before the end of about four or five weeks.’
    1. 1.1A cut of meat containing all or part of this.
      • ‘Verlaine's chine was stuffed with leeks, spring onions, lettuce, raspberry leaves, parsley, thyme and marjoram.’
      • ‘In addition to bread the earl and countess received a quart of beer, a quart of wine, half a chine of mutton or a chine of boiled beef.’
      • ‘If a chine of beef is a cut of meat containing part of the backbone, as above, then it is a very good cut for a roast, containing at least part of the short-loin, and possibly part of the tenderloin.’
      • ‘To buy a chine, stuffed and cooked, or uncooked and ready for you to stuff, apply to this company.’
    2. 1.2A mountain ridge or arête.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cut (meat) across or along the backbone.

    • ‘Ask for an aged standing rib roast from the forequarter, trimmed and chined; bring to room temperature before roasting.’
    • ‘Order a day or two ahead, and ask specifically for a six to eight-chop pork loin from the best end, chined, with the rib bones trimmed as for rack of lamb, and the rind vertically scored.’
    • ‘There was in 16c England a set of verbs for carving kinds of game, fish, and poultry, which included allaying a pheasant, barbing a lobster, chining a salmon, fracting a chicken, sculling a tench, and unbracing a mallard.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French eschine, based on a blend of Latin spina spine and a Germanic word meaning narrow piece related to shin.

Pronunciation:

chine

/CHīn/

Main definitions of chine in English

: chine1chine2chine3

chine2

noun

British
  • A deep, narrow ravine formed by running water.

    • ‘Many chines still exist in the South Wight and Hampshire.’
    • ‘As the walls of the chines and cliffs of the south coast of the Isle of Wight are so unstable and erode continually, the strata is clearly visible, with 65 million years of geological history clear to see.’

Origin

Old English: cinu cleft, chink of Germanic origin; related to Dutch keen, also to chink.

Pronunciation:

chine

/CHīn/

Main definitions of chine in English

: chine1chine2chine3

chine3

noun

  • The angle where the bottom of a boat or ship meets the side.

    • ‘This semi-displacement hull form is well suited to fishermen and lobstermen who must get their nets and pots onboard without hanging up on the hard chine of planing hulls.’
    • ‘Extrusions of 6061 or 6063 are used for structural and decorative sections, such as keels, chines, gunwales, and spray rails.’
    • ‘The hard chine hull features a transverse step and a transom flap.’
    • ‘The Bertram 31 and its prototype were designed with a remarkable 23-degree angle of deadrise at the transom with three lifting strakes on each side from the keel to the chine.’
    • ‘Still not enough, and now the line is almost straight up and down and I really have to concentrate hard, very aware of the light line and the hard chine of the hull.’

Origin

Late Middle English: variant of chime (the original sense).

Pronunciation:

chine

/CHīn/