Definition of chart in English:



  • 1A sheet of information in the form of a table, graph, or diagram.

    ‘a chart showing how much do-it-yourself costs compared with retail’
    • ‘Science questions often consist of interpreting a graph or a chart correctly rather than knowing anything about chemical properties or physical laws.’
    • ‘The abundance of figures, tables, charts, and examples help make the research results more understandable.’
    • ‘His collection of antique graphs and finely ruled charts works great for explaining information design to academics and engineers.’
    • ‘There is a choice between several standard graph styles, bar charts, pie charts and line charts.’
    • ‘The distribution of patients according to vital status, therapy received, or a specific prognostic factor can also be displayed as a table or a chart.’
    • ‘The couch was inviting, but the table in front was devoid of his charts and probe data sheets.’
    • ‘It contains many descriptive black and white drawings, as well as tables, charts, and graphs, to illustrate information in the text.’
    • ‘The graphs and charts provide fascinating information, along with colorful photographs of many different types of chameleons.’
    • ‘His well-structured argument included charts, graphs, and scientific data to describe climate change trends.’
    • ‘Don't you have a chart or a graph somewhere that tells you when you've repeated yourself.’
    • ‘This documentation frequently is supplemented with tables, charts, and graphs to illustrate information presented in the text.’
    • ‘This bit of dry data, presented in charts and tables of figures intelligible only to specialists, links the unremarkable urban events with the movement of the stars.’
    • ‘Maybe you hate paperwork and your dream come true would be to have all the quotes reformatted as a graph or a comparison chart instead of having to sit there and read through the lot.’
    • ‘He had carefully drawn various diagrams and charts on oversize graph paper.’
    • ‘There were neatly laid out charts, tables and graphs in bright colours, illustrating the statistical information and making it all easier to spot the main trends.’
    • ‘The chart above shows a graph of the most influential or authoritative blogs as compared with the most authoritative ‘big media’ sites.’
    • ‘It also helps to extract information into charts, tables, bulleted lists and interactive graphics.’
    • ‘Frequently, a sketch, a map, a chart, a graph, a computerized illustration or even a photograph really has no probative value at all.’
    • ‘As the chart illustrates, the longer you have your money invested, the greater your investment return and the less you need to save to reach your goal.’
    • ‘She was sitting as usual at the table with sheets and charts spread all around her, a pen in her hand and a coffee close by.’
    graph, table, tabulation, grid, histogram, diagram, guide, scheme, figure, illustration
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    1. 1.1A weekly listing of the current best-selling pop records.
      ‘she topped the charts for eight weeks’
      • ‘In the early 1960s, the lyrical tenor saxophonist Stan Getz topped the charts with recordings of music by Brazilian composer Antonio Carlos Jobim.’
      • ‘His highly anticipated CD made its way to the top of the charts, selling an impressive 450,000 copies its first week in stores.’
      • ‘His work has taken him to Europe, Japan and China, where his artist is currently topping the charts.’
      • ‘I haven't had a number one record in the charts but then again I think that can have its own pitfalls.’
      • ‘Now he is a rap star whose music tops the charts in his adopted home of Kenya.’
      • ‘The act's new album, currently topping the charts, looks set to do the same.’
      • ‘Yesterday he was whisked from his North London hotel after grabbing a few hours' sleep to begin the journey he hopes will take him to the top of the charts.’
      • ‘The song, the undoubted highlight of the evening, is currently top of the charts - with a little help from Bolton comedian Peter Kay.’
      • ‘I did a couple of interviews for some popular magazines and had a record in the charts which is unusual for a jazz musician but for the most part, I was just trying to let folks know about jazz music.’
      • ‘It should surprise no one that the record entered the charts at No. 1 in eleven countries.’
      • ‘It brought the guys back into the charts, but it was another eight months before they recorded a brand new album at a studio in Sweden.’
      • ‘I believe their music is better than some music currently fighting for the charts.’
      • ‘Both the single and the album have topped the charts with the album selling more than 600,000 copies in three months.’
      • ‘It was a landmark and helped lay the foundations for the current urban music takeover of the charts and clubs.’
      • ‘Glenn Miller's follow-up recording remained at the top of the charts for months.’
      • ‘All will be hoping to follow in the footsteps of last year's winner, David Sneddon, who topped the charts with his debut single, Stop Living The Lie.’
      • ‘The band, who topped the charts with their self-titled debut record, hope to have the new material ready for release early next year.’
      • ‘Their debut album shot to the top of the charts on March 6 and sold more than 200,000 in its first week on sale.’
      • ‘That was also an era when comedy records were routinely topping the charts.’
      • ‘He landed more records on the charts than anyone in history.’
      hit parade, top twenty
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    2. 1.2A geographical map or plan, especially one used for navigation by sea or air.
      • ‘Items on a table included an air chart of the US, and a flight instruction manual.’
      • ‘Our chart showed a group of small islands off to starboard, with - unusually - a marked channel leading in.’
      • ‘He also drew the first accurate navigation charts of the islands.’
      • ‘The manual also contains a handy navigation chart for the control panel on the printer itself.’
      • ‘These objects were not marked on nautical charts.’
      • ‘Without an accurate chart, she anchored in Betano Bay at dusk on September 23, 1942 and commenced disembarking troops over her quarterdeck.’
      • ‘Her current task is to undertake survey work, updating existing charts and navigational resources.’
      • ‘Balides, embarking on his 24th mission, was there with his track chart and flight plan.’
      • ‘Each participant of the rally, that began from Grand Hyatt hotel here, was given a navigation chart containing directions of route and driving speed.’
      • ‘Among the items in the collection is Captain Cook's original chart of Newfoundland - one of more than 100,000 items which will be located in the Naval Base.’
      • ‘The only hang-up was the navigation chart got sucked out the window somewhere over North Carolina; fortunately, we were in a familiar area.’
      • ‘Many were wrecked because of inadequate knowledge or charts, poor navigation skills or handling but also as a result of the unpredictable seas and weather.’
      • ‘Glancing at our navigation chart, I noticed the Lakehurst Naval Air Station with its huge airship hangars was slightly off course inland.’
      • ‘Your choice of aeronautical charts also is important.’
      • ‘The case for more accurate and timely government nautical charts seems to have resonated within the new Bush Administration this year.’
      • ‘All the airspace changes will be depicted on aeronautical charts from November 25.’
      • ‘Having to navigate whilst seated on the deck facing aft with only a chart, a stopwatch and a navigation plan is a feat few could accomplish and must be admired.’
      • ‘For example, you want to make sure that the ‘old’ name is removed from everything on board, including log books and charts.’
      • ‘Until now, boaters with navigation software had to purchase their charts from a vendor or pay a vendor for a subscription to a chart updating service.’
      • ‘Dee prepared nautical information, including charts for navigation in the polar regions, for the company during the next 32 years.’
      blueprint, drawing, scale drawing, diagram, sketch, map, layout, artist's impression
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    3. 1.3Medicine A written record of information about a patient.
      ‘scribbled on a patient's chart’
      • ‘It is essential that the volume be exact and that this volume is recorded in the patient's chart.’
      • ‘Clinical data and follow-up information were obtained from patients' charts and referring clinicians in all cases.’
      • ‘Their role is to help the student acquire the data, either through the computer or patient's chart.’
      • ‘Concerned, the pharmacist goes to the patient's chart and briefly reviews the case.’
      • ‘If the patient has been admitted to the hospital before, the preadmission nurse reviews the patient's previous chart as well.’
      • ‘He or she reviews the patient's chart for relevant laboratory values, the presence of a consent for blood administration, and an order for blood products.’
      • ‘If the presence of severe pain is confirmed, a ‘pain’ sticker is placed on the patient's chart.’
      • ‘The nurse then went over the patient's chart, and they talked about the surgical procedure.’
      • ‘Even in 2001, most results still were either printed out or manually written on patient charts.’
      • ‘Clinical information was retrieved from the patient's medical chart.’
      • ‘I also found it physically awkward to juggle the tablet and the patient's chart, which I often had to do this weekend when paged in the middle of writing a progress note.’
      • ‘However, each chart had a record of the patients' symptoms, physical examination, and therapy given.’
      • ‘The nurse greets the patient and after reviewing the patient's chart, performs an assessment.’
      • ‘A coding error may have resulted from misinterpretation of the patient's chart.’
      • ‘Ideally, have the patient's chart or pertinent laboratory data on hand during the conversation.’
      • ‘Most clinicians expect a patient's chart to contain reliable and valid information and understand that it serves as the legal record of the patient's care.’
      • ‘Results are documented on the patient's chart, and abnormal results are reported to the surgeon or his or her designated assistant.’
      • ‘The agreement may be written as a physician's note in the patient's chart so that it can be referred to later.’
      • ‘The patient's chart provides information that shows that care has been provided and can be used to resolve questions or concerns about the provision of care.’
      • ‘The patient's hospital chart contained little information on his past social history or family medical history.’
    4. 1.4Astrology A map showing the positions of the planets at the time of someone's birth, from which astrologers are said to be able to deduce character or potential.
      • ‘Your astrologer will work from your birth chart based on your birth details.’
      • ‘The possibility of a knock to the head affecting the hearing is not unsupported in his birth chart.’
      • ‘Even though the sun is important in the birth chart, it is only one of many indicators of personality.’
      • ‘His birth chart indicates much tension in his love life and suggests a divine discontent that would never let him rest on his laurels.’
      • ‘Does being born on a leap year day have any significance in your birth chart?’
      • ‘The lack of air in a birth chart can indicate difficulty in the expression of that person.’
      • ‘Oddly enough, as you have noted, Saturn is the strongest planet in your birth chart.’
      • ‘It is well worth finding out the position of Jupiter by sign and house in your birth chart, as these hold clues to how you can/will find abundance and joy in life.’
      • ‘One can almost say we see your mother in your birth chart.’
      • ‘You have great potential in your birth chart and the ability to always learn something new.’
      • ‘The astrologer can look at my birth chart and say that it's a very good time to start my export-import business.’
      • ‘There really is very little astrological connection between your birth chart and his that would indicate a long-term relationship.’
      • ‘The natal chart, or birth chart, is an accurate map of the sky at the time of birth; equivalent to a fingerprint with everyone's being unique.’
      • ‘However, if for some reason you simply want to ‘look ahead’ without much in-depth analysis of the birth chart, you may order this report.’
      • ‘They did not even usefully agree on what the birth chart indicates.’
      • ‘But to remain cheerful I decided to get an online birth chart reading.’
      • ‘If it is at all possible for you, I suggest you attend it and perhaps get an in-depth reading of your birth chart from one of the excellent astrologers who will be there.’
      • ‘A birth chart looks a bit like a pie cut into 12 slices.’
      • ‘What I noticed in your birth chart in particular is an opposition between moon in Taurus and Venus in Scorpio.’
      • ‘So I would go to the library and get books on different companies, then look at the charts for the companies, trying to work out whether you could actually see what happened to the company by looking at its birth chart.’


  • 1[with object] Make a map of (an area)

    • ‘They span the period from James Cook's first Pacific voyage, which charted the east coast of Australia in 1770, to the present.’
    • ‘Interest in the colonies was also sustained by a new generation of restless, independent-minded explorers who set off to chart the unmapped areas beyond the frontiers of the French Empire.’
    • ‘It wasn't until these areas were charted, the dangers known, and markets for goods discovered that private ships sailed the ocean to move goods around the planet.’
    • ‘Tipperary man Henry Kellett was the first European to sight and chart the Siberian coast.’
    • ‘Flinders surveyed and charted the entire south coast from Cape Leeuwin and reached South Australian waters in January 1802 also charting the coast, islands, bays and headlands.’
    • ‘As well as observing the transit of Venus at Tahiti, Cook charted the coasts of both the large islands of New Zealand and of eastern Australia.’
    • ‘A Soviet oceanographer added his own theory to the pile in 1979, when he charted a sunken plateau about 560 miles off the western coast of Portugal.’
    • ‘He also learnt about cartographic techniques, that is the ability to go and chart coasts of new lands.’
    • ‘I had spent an idyllic summer on Mayne Island which takes its name from a lieutenant on a Royal Navy survey ship that charted these waters a century and a half ago.’
    • ‘In 1821 Captain Philip P. King visited Stanley Island as he sailed north, charting the coasts for the British Navy in the interests of colonial power.’
    • ‘The ship went on to chart the east coast of Australia, successfully claiming half the continent for King George III.’
    • ‘Leaving New Zealand in April 1770, Cook made for Australia and began charting the coast.’
    • ‘Volunteers will get a designated area to chart starting at 12 noon and all are welcome to go along to help.’
    • ‘Cook charted the coasts and seaways of Canada, the St Lawrence Channel and the coasts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.’
    • ‘On September 14 the unit was reconnoitred as a diversionary raid; two mines were found and detonated and the beach and defense positions charted.’
    • ‘The island was clearly identified in court records of the Ming dynasty, charted by the explorer Cheng Ho in 1430 and given its current name, Taiwan.’
    • ‘But the Pacific Ocean is unpredictable, some areas are not charted well and some of the charts go back to the last century so you can get reefs and islands off where they actually are.’
    1. 1.1Plot (a course) on a chart.
      ‘the pilot found his craft taking a route he had not charted’
      • ‘You have to chart your own course, for you know best your situation.’
      • ‘And by far the best way to enjoy it is to hire a cabin cruiser and chart a course along its winding length.’
      • ‘Knowing how they have charted their courses can only help as you begin to chart yours.’
      • ‘Her surname suits, because you'll need an atlas to chart her background.’
      • ‘Actually, the route that the bus follows was charted by a police constable by the name of Tolmer.’
      • ‘Instead we carry on our proud tradition of charting an independent course.’
      • ‘Lee turned from the windows and followed his executive to the table, and they began to chart a new course.’
      • ‘They wanted their clubs to go one way, but found others charting a different course.’
      • ‘It is the 17th book in a series of guides charting the pharmaceutical industry's progress in major disease areas.’
      • ‘Hence they can be used as unfaltering focal points by which to chart your personal development.’
      • ‘In the special exhibition area the costume gallery charts some of the radical changes that have occurred in tennis outfits, especially for women.’
      • ‘Although it charts the development of ideas in Van Gogh's ouevre, the show is not organised strictly chronologically, but by theme.’
      • ‘I shall continue to chart my own course to recovery.’
      • ‘The Canadian Cancer Society, on the other hand, has recently charted an independent course.’
      • ‘A new book has been published tracing the history of an Oakworth family and charting its influence on the area.’
      • ‘Rather than tying literary phenomena to underlying social and political developments, she charts an autonomous history for literature itself.’
      • ‘It wants to chart the changing landscape of the area and its transformation from marshes to a new town.’
      • ‘It highlights key facets of presidential policies and priorities, difficulties and conflicts, while charting the developing nature of the office.’
      • ‘But he must be left unfettered to chart his own course, do the job as a true political leader and with all the powers normally associated with true leadership.’
      • ‘It was Charles de Gaulle who first charted this course.’
      follow, trace, outline, describe, detail, note, report, record, register, document, chronicle, log, catalogue
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    2. 1.2Record the progress or development of.
      ‘the poems chart his descent into madness’
      ‘a major series charting the history of country music’
      • ‘As there can be 100 or so storms a year meteorologists need a means of identifying individual storms to avoid confusion, especially as one or more storms may be followed and charted by many meteorologists simultaneously.’
      • ‘A national database charts more than 28 million UK addresses which can identify whether or not a home has a licence.’
      • ‘Jane, a registered nurse on a busy surgical unit, completes an assessment of one of her assigned postoperative patients but charts minimal information on the patient record.’
      • ‘Certain off licences in the city centre operate a refusal register, which charts the estimated age of children that they turn away.’
      • ‘Federal investigators are scouring records to chart the life of the animal and others in its birth herd for evidence that they may have consumed contaminated feed.’
      • ‘In an intensive work period, Beagle surveyed more than 120 square miles of sea-bed, locating and charting more than 3,500 identifiable individual features.’
      • ‘System software generates reports and charts the results to user specifications.’
      • ‘All aspects of each practice game should be charted and recorded so that individual player analysis is complete.’
      • ‘Today, unattended robotic telescopes scan skies that have been charted over centuries, recording their findings in modern databases.’
      • ‘Participants recorded and charted their daily lifestyle activities in each area to provide evaluative feedback.’
      • ‘The final survey results will be revealed in the live event starting in late May, with the overall aim being to gain 100,000 recordings charting spring's arrival.’
      • ‘I explain their viewing will be first charted, then restricted.’
      • ‘This now holds over 5.2 million records of marine life and has charted 38,000 species.’
      • ‘The work is double- and triple-checked by two other reporters charting the game from home.’
      • ‘In principle, victim surveys are an additional way of charting the nature of victimization.’
      • ‘The technique measures activity in different regions of the brain by charting the flow of blood to particular areas.’
      • ‘The stable funds will rarely need charting, just a monthly record of prices.’
      • ‘Coach Smith's system of different defenses are charted in the following diagram.’
      • ‘These summary scores and a summary score for all areas were calculated, recorded, and charted on a lifestyle summary sheet.’
      • ‘Participants also calculated and charted a weekly summary of their lifestyle activities in each area for additional feedback.’
      tabulate, plot, graph, delineate, map, map out, draw up, sketch, draft, document, record, register, represent
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  • 2[no object] (of a record) enter the weekly music charts at a particular position.

    ‘the record will probably chart at about No. 74’
    • ‘Christine is one of the few female writers to have charted two hit records in the same top ten.’
    • ‘Their debut single reached No 7 but the three follow-ups charted at lower and lower positions.’
    • ‘He's sold more than 45 million of them, charted 75 times.’
    • ‘Propelled by the omnipresent single Dreaming of You, their eponymous debut album charted at number five, sold half a million copies and was nominated for the prestigious music prize.’
    • ‘Ultimately the single will only chart well if it is on radio play lists.’
    • ‘We think the singer has brilliant material, and it's the record company, not her, that made it chart really low.’
    • ‘Despite this, the single sold 150,000 copies in five days and charted at number 11.’
    • ‘Martin is hoping it will chart high enough for the band to reappear on the TV programme.’
    • ‘For the next eight years Joan toured the world to sell out audiences, each album charted, and the hit singles just kept on coming.’
    • ‘A number of radio stations have loved their work, thus far, and play it often enough to have it chart well.’
    • ‘This should chart well next Sunday though as many fans will have it on the album I wouldn't expect it to get as far as the top ten.’


Late 16th century: from French charte, from Latin charta paper, papyrus leaf (see card).