Main definitions of Charleston in English

: Charleston1Charleston2

Charleston1

proper noun

  • 1The capital of West Virginia, in the southwestern part of the state; population 50,302 (est. 2008)

  • 2A city and port in South Carolina; population 111,978 (est. 2008). The bombardment of Fort Sumter in 1861 by Confederate troops marked the beginning of the Civil War.

Pronunciation:

Charleston

/ˈCHärlstən/

Main definitions of Charleston in English

: Charleston1Charleston2

Charleston2

(also charleston)

noun

  • A lively dance of the 1920s that involved turning the knees inward and kicking out the lower legs.

    • ‘Sadie and Joseph performed a freestyle dance, the lindyhop and charleston in Saturday's final, which was contested by three couples.’
    • ‘I took up ballroom dance first because it seemed like an interesting thing to learn, but I was particularly attracted to swing as I loved the music - everything from charleston, 1930s big band, right up to modern-day swing bands.’
    • ‘Over time, a faster version was born, absorbing extra elements of ragtime such as the charleston.’
    • ‘From tap to tango, Cuban salsa to the charleston, lambada to lindy hop, the most dazzling duos will be setting the dance floor and the nation's hearts alight in the hope of winning viewers' votes.’
    • ‘The forerunners of all the swing dances, namely the charleston and particularly the lesser known collegiate, are responsible for the existence of the shag.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Dance the Charleston.

    • ‘Make like '20s screen sirens Louise Brooks, Tallulah Bankhead and designer Coco Chanel and charleston the night away.’
    • ‘The Big Band supplied the hip tunes and while some cut a rug, others were happy to watch the professional dance troupe lindy-hop, charleston and spin their way to rapturous applause.’
    • ‘She called on Tuesday and begged me to go teach her class to charleston.’
    • ‘But it wasn't until Choco Chanel charlestoned back from the Mediterranean with a deep golden tan, that bronzed skin became a truly desirable item.’
    • ‘She made them sing it twice as she danced, clapped, frugged and charlestoned through the renditions.’

Origin

1920s: named after Charleston in South Carolina.

Pronunciation:

Charleston

/ˈCHärlstən/