Definition of characterization in US English:

characterization

(British characterisation)

noun

  • 1The creation or construction of a fictional character.

    ‘he preferred to emphasize characterization and human conflict’
    ‘the film's narrative elegance and richly developed characterizations’
    • ‘Technically outstanding, it offers all the visual thrills of a superhero action movie set in the recent past, and boasts marvelous characterizations from a top cast.’
    • ‘Inside every characterization lurks the possibility of parody.’
    • ‘Although the dynamic of this relationship is fairly bland, the characterization of the killer is more inspired.’
    • ‘There is a fairly violent characterization of a therapist in this book.’
    • ‘There's little in the way of plot or characterization, so the whole point seems to be waiting around for something gory to happen, which it does around every six minutes.’
    • ‘The actor doesn't cop out by relying on past characterizations.’
    • ‘It was the writer's first solo credit, and it appears that he missed a couple of lessons on characterization and development.’
    • ‘What she is trying to do is to produce the conflict, the characterization, the action, that will constitute a drama.’
    • ‘With its predetermined characterizations, the film needs all the charisma of its stars to win the emotional investment of the audience.’
    • ‘Not one of them acquires the slightest depth of characterization in the course of the book's 300-plus pages.’
  • 2A description of the distinctive nature or features of someone or something.

    ‘she rejected that characterization of her film’
    • ‘She has linked her interpretations of well-being in terms of capabilities to characterizations of egalitarianism.’
    • ‘This questions the continuing relevance in the light of changing characterizations and ways of experiencing modernity.’
    • ‘Others objected to the artist's characterization of Jane Grey on purely historical grounds.’
    • ‘Their characterization of the neoclassical model approach to rural development is far too narrow.’
    • ‘Although both characterizations are widely prevalent, they are also mutually incompatible.’
    • ‘A key to consistency is characterization—that is, an understanding of how the fiber will perform under various conditions.’
    • ‘His military/political vocabulary provides an amusing contrast with conventional characterizations of science.’
    • ‘Others have developed formal characterizations of equality of resources, opportunity, and outcomes.’
    • ‘At another level, it could not help but replicate these earlier characterizations of degenerate families.’
    • ‘The government provided no concrete characterization of the actual threat and offered no evidence to back up its increasingly sensationalized warnings.’

Pronunciation

characterization

/ˌkɛrəktəraɪˈzeɪʃ(ə)n//ˌkerəktərīˈzāSH(ə)n/