Main definitions of chap in English

: chap1chap2chap3

chap1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (of the skin) become cracked, rough, or sore, typically through exposure to cold weather.

    • ‘A layer of sun-protective lip balm is all it takes to prevent chapping.’
    • ‘Dairy farmers learned long ago that the salves they used to prevent cows' udders from chapping also worked beautifully for their own hands.’
    • ‘‘Prevent chapping by wearing hats, gloves, and scarves to cover your skin,’ Stone says.’
    • ‘People with eczema and allergies tend to have lips that chap easily.’
    • ‘The cosmetic industry employs glycerin in skin conditioning lotions to replace lost skin moisture, relieve chapping, and keep skin soft.’
    • ‘It's stopped my skin chapping when I used to go round lambing the ewes.’
    • ‘I need to apply lip moisturizers all day long to avoid chapping.’
    • ‘It's essential to moisturize baby's delicate skin to protect it and prevent chapping, especially in cold, dry weather.’
    become raw, become sore, redden, become inflamed, chafe, crack, roughen
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1usually as adjective chapped[with object] (of the wind or cold) cause (skin) to crack through exposure to cold weather.
      ‘chapped lips’
      • ‘The infant who is drooling often has chapped skin around the mouth, on the chest, or on the hands.’
      • ‘Wind buffeted her, chapping her lips and slowing her crawl.’
      • ‘Her lips and cheeks were chapped and red but her eyes gleamed.’
      • ‘It was work that chapped my hands, taxed my muscles, and opened my naive eyes.’
      • ‘I only buy them to keep my lips from being chapped.’
      • ‘Winter air can chap the skin of children and adults, which can lead to winter itch.’
      • ‘Thirty-eight testers on two coasts - armed with dry, chapped, rough skin - soaked, scrubbed, moisturized and massaged to find out what really works.’
      • ‘To be fully effective, it is necessary to use a moisturizer three or more times daily, in the same way that chapped hands in the winter need many treatments.’
      • ‘Tamora drew her cloak about her, appreciating the warm mantle with its fur lining, whilst the air chapped her lips and pinched her nose and cheeks.’
      • ‘With a labored breath, his pale, chapped lips mouthed her name.’
      • ‘Clinical manifestations are dryness of the mouth, lips and nose, dryness of the tongue, dry, rough and chapped skin, dry stool, etc.’
      • ‘My lips were slightly chapped, and there were circles under my eyes.’
      • ‘To compensate for the weather which dries the skin and chaps the lips, there are goodies in the form of freshly grilled kebabs in the stalls around Russel Market and elsewhere.’
      • ‘My lips were chapped, so I dug into my backpack for some lip balm.’
      • ‘Drinking more water has made a difference in my skin, and I no longer have chapped lips all the time.’
      • ‘My lips were chapped, so I ran my tongue over them quickly.’
      • ‘Her lips were chapped from the wind and I thought her nose was too small.’
      • ‘Heaving a sigh, she pressed her slightly chapped lips together and began to read.’
      • ‘If your skin is windburned, sunburned or chapped, calm it with soap rich in soothing glycerin and aloe vera, and avoid bars with fragrances, which can further irritate the skin.’
      • ‘Apply petroleum jelly to dry and chapped skin near the nose.’

noun

  • A cracked or sore patch on the skin.

    • ‘Our lips will be covered in chaps.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

chap

/CHap/

Main definitions of chap in English

: chap1chap2chap3

chap2

noun

British
informal
  • 1A man or a boy.

    • ‘I have one customer, a chap in his seventies, an ex-engineer who collects knives and swords; he owns more than 400 of them, all different.’
    • ‘He is described as a quiet man, and by one acquaintance as a ‘strange sort of chap.’’
    • ‘Maybe it is difficult to imagine these guys as nice chaps when your machismo immediately assumes they'll be natural born show-offs.’
    • ‘‘He was, surprisingly, quite a quiet chap,’ recalls the Scot.’
    • ‘Britain's most famous survival expert is clearly not the sort of chap to indulge himself with superfluous gadgets.’
    • ‘This tall, dark and lithe chap hoovers up food and never gains an ounce, whilst I weep for my waistline.’
    • ‘A cute picture of the kids tells a man's colleagues that he's a well-rounded chap who loves his family.’
    • ‘Eventually, I talked to a chap who promised to sort things out and he asked me to fax the bill through.’
    • ‘"This chap came up and introduced himself as Jeff, " she said.’
    • ‘After another twenty minutes on hold, I finally spoke to a friendly chap who told me they had six staff to take calls from their entire network of customers.’
    • ‘He was such a lovely, cheeky chap.’
    • ‘He is a nervy, jumpy sort of a chap, who follows people with his eyes as they move about a room.’
    • ‘He was a laid-back and friendly chap who loved a beer and his sport.’
    • ‘This chap was going out with one of my best friends at university.’
    • ‘The best male singer was a chap called Stanley who the audience showed wild appreciation for.’
    • ‘Can you believe it, some chap with a beard stole my clothes at gunpoint?’
    • ‘You hire a bouncer because you want to keep people out, whereas a restaurant is the sort of place where a chap wants to feel that they want him to come in.’
    • ‘Just this morning we took delivery (from a very nice chap named Mike) of three vintage typewriters.’
    • ‘Propped against the bar, to one side of my father stood his mate Barry - a jovial sort of chap, but full of blunt Yorkshire bluster and some cutting comments about my colourful shirt.’
    • ‘Eventually I received a tap on the shoulder by an official looking older chap who wanted to know why I was taking photos.’
    man, boy, male, individual, body
    fellow, fella, geezer, punter, character, customer, sort, type
    bloke, guy, lad, bod
    dude, hombre
    cove
    wight
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1dated A friendly form of address between men and boys.
      ‘best of luck, old chap’
      • ‘Bloody nice job old chap - I knew it would all work out!’
      • ‘My dear old chap, I do believe you're right.’
      • ‘‘Don't expect much from her, chap,’ whispered John as they entered a new room.’
      • ‘I say, old chap, you seem to have a bit of a problem in your news and current affairs departments.’
      • ‘Pardon me, old chap, but aren't you getting just a bit ahead of yourself in rather an offensive manner?’

Origin

Late 16th century (denoting a buyer or customer): abbreviation of chapman. The current sense dates from the early 18th century.

Pronunciation:

chap

/CHap/

Main definitions of chap in English

: chap1chap2chap3

chap3

noun

usually chaps
  • The lower jaw or half of the cheek, especially that of a pig used as food.

    • ‘Bath chaps are often eaten cold, making a tasty dish.’
    • ‘They carry their meat in the storehouses of their own chaps or cheeks, taking it forth when they are hungry.’
    • ‘Bath chaps can be sliced and eaten like ham.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: of unknown origin. Compare with chops.

Pronunciation:

chap

/CHap/