Definition of champion in English:

champion

noun

  • 1A person who has defeated or surpassed all rivals in a competition, especially in sports.

    as modifier ‘a champion hurdler’
    • ‘He said that the Sport's Court decision was not fair and had been made in favour of his rivals for the champion's title.’
    • ‘They are the pair competition champions after beating Wragg and Nick Brown.’
    • ‘What we need is a gladiatorial contest between the representative champions of each political party.’
    • ‘Reality television stars made a scene with sporting champions from a Prep School on Monday.’
    • ‘Property incentives have already persuaded British sporting champions to holiday and train in Dubai.’
    • ‘He didn't tell his mates at school about all his medical problems and he didn't mention that against all the odds, he was a sporting champion.’
    • ‘Good days seem to be ahead for the one time football champion.’
    • ‘But she has defied the odds to become a sporting champion in karate, swimming and running.’
    • ‘Bradford based Campion Reserves could be crowned champions of that particular competition if they take at least a point from their next game.’
    • ‘Hingis, then aged only nine but already tipped as a future champion, won that contest as well against the older Italian.’
    • ‘Once all four competitions have been completed, an average of each unit's scores over the entire competition will determine the champion.’
    • ‘The accidental champion: injuries to rivals, good fortune and, yes, a little planning helped the Spurs win a championship ahead of schedule.’
    • ‘A past champion when this contest was held at the now-defunct Upper Level Club, Alicia Wellington was the first up and set a high standard for the competition.’
    • ‘During the '90s, he saw little competition as the heavyweight champion in the group fitness ring.’
    • ‘Ironically the man who was a world champion in wood chopping, loved trees.’
    • ‘Britain's recent dearth of sporting champions has also been blamed on schemes that oppose competitiveness.’
    • ‘This was once a brief competition in which the champions of each European country played each other to find a winner.’
    • ‘Surely, though, the question here is not whether these once great champions can return to competition but why on earth they would want to?’
    • ‘The competition ensured that the champion was decided only in the last round of the league.’
    • ‘Gargrave were crowned Craven Football League champions after a thrilling match against their nearest rivals, Embsay.’
    winner, title-holder, defending champion, gold medallist
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  • 2A person who fights or argues for a cause or on behalf of someone else.

    ‘a champion of women's rights’
    • ‘He became the champion of ethnic Albanian separatism.’
    • ‘Only then did California become a champion of environmental protection.’
    • ‘During the Peloponnesian War, Athens, the champion of democracies, of course supported the democrats throughout Greece whenever it could.’
    • ‘Candidate A is running on a platform that he protects the environment and is a champion of a woman's right to choose.’
    • ‘In addition to the classical standards, Julian is a great champion of modern music and shortly begins recording on a new composition by Philip Glass.’
    • ‘He is also a strong supporter of devolving power to the regions and is a champion of the campaign to create a directly elected Yorkshire mini-parliament.’
    • ‘A native of North Carolina, Gray is one of the pre-eminent lawyers here in Washington, and a tireless champion of conservative causes.’
    • ‘Although Munir never claimed that his efforts were intended to protect women's rights, many women activists viewed the slain campaigner as a champion of women's rights.’
    • ‘On the campaign trail, he proclaimed himself a champion of Italy's private sector.’
    • ‘Whether Michael or Michelle, she has always been a strong liberal supporter and champion of women's causes.’
    • ‘She then transforms into a champion of animal rights just so that her little Taco Bell doggie ‘Bruiser’ can have his birth mother attend her wedding.’
    • ‘Of course, in Texas, being a champion of the environment has never been a guarantee of political success.’
    • ‘Well, the Prime Minister's always very fair about these matters, and he is a great champion of the democratic system of government.’
    • ‘It needs to recognise that, all too often, it poses as a champion of democracy while supporting regimes which have no proper respect for democracy.’
    • ‘She once worked for a Democratic party congressman, and is a champion of progressive causes including the advancement of women in business.’
    • ‘Although he is a registered Democrat, he has close ties with conservative Republicans, and has become something of a champion of their Cold War views.’
    • ‘Mrs Smith, a long-term champion of animal rights, said she had been frustrated by the House of Lords which had repeatedly wrecked the Government's decision to ban fox hunting.’
    • ‘This is particularly so since he is now putting himself forward as a candidate for national office as the champion of the progressive wing of the Democratic party.’
    • ‘A champion of privatization, he's been holding closed-door meetings with moderate Democrats in the hopes of forging a compromise.’
    • ‘Thus, he cannot present himself as a champion of democracy and at the same time adhere to the position of those who dismiss it.’
    advocate, proponent, promoter, proposer, supporter, standard-bearer, torch-bearer, defender, protector, upholder, backer, exponent, patron, sponsor, prime mover
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    1. 2.1historical A knight who fought in single combat on behalf of the monarch.
      • ‘Despite the occasional champion who amassed riches, most fighters came from extremely poor families, and they remained poor.’
      • ‘These were complemented by the Norman practice of Trial by Battle, in which the judgement of God was determined not by the speed it took you to heal from the Ordeal, but by the success of your champion in battle.’
      • ‘She had never so much as read about medieval knights, and now she had to fight like a champion.’
      • ‘The River Knights watched intensely as one of their own, their champion, Christopher Knight fought John Pavin, their evil nemesis.’
      • ‘Tensions are running high as William seeks to prove himself a champion and a true knight once and for all.’
      knight, man-at-arms, warrior, defender, duellist, paladin, hero
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Support the cause of; defend.

    ‘priests who championed human rights’
    • ‘Sometimes other people happen to be championing the artist at the same time, and lo and behold, they get national radio play.’
    • ‘The Labour Party historically has also championed human rights.’
    • ‘You would think that she would be championing gay rights more fervently.’
    • ‘Founded in 1968, the museum has always championed the work of Black artists.’
    • ‘Even some of those who have aggressively championed the marriage campaign fear they have made dubious bedfellows.’
    • ‘The club has championed a campaign to host a new tournament on the lucrative European Seniors' Tour programme next year.’
    • ‘But Michael, you have betrayed those whose cause you once championed.’
    • ‘With its gallery journal, lectures and classes, SF Camerawork has consistently championed innovations in photography.’
    • ‘I found a number of sites championing approaches to healthy eating based on regulating minerals and trace elements which appealed to me.’
    • ‘Doubtless he will now spend his retirement wafting between his various properties and reflecting how championing the poor can enrich your life.’
    • ‘One of the candidates has shown a commitment to progressive politics and championing civil rights issues.’
    • ‘Supporters of the draft are using it to promote indirectly politics we should champion openly and up front.’
    • ‘He identified with the oppressed and exploited everywhere and championed their struggles for emancipation.’
    • ‘Kerr went further by championing women in the clergy.’
    • ‘Volunteers descended on Brentford's river banks at the weekend to take part in a clean up campaign championed by locals.’
    • ‘A second approach, championed by Sidney Pollard, is to think of economic change in regional terms.’
    • ‘The Lord Mayor is also championing the uniformed organisations, such as Scouts and Guides.’
    • ‘He also championed an initiative to increase college enrollment of Georgia's Black men.’
    • ‘The act of censorship turned the film into a cause célèbre, with Warren Beatty, among others, championing it.’
    • ‘He used both his position and his power to promote social change, and always championed the underdog.’
    advocate, promote, plead for, hold a torch for, defend, protect, uphold, support, back, espouse, ally oneself with, stand behind, stand up for, take someone's part, campaign for, lobby for, fight for, battle for, crusade for, take up the cudgels for
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (denoting a fighting man): from Old French, from medieval Latin campio(n-) ‘fighter’, from Latin campus (see camp).

Pronunciation

champion

/ˈtʃæmpiən//ˈCHampēən/