Main definitions of cess in English

: cess1cess2

cess1

(also sess)

noun

  • (in Scotland, Ireland, and India) a tax or levy.

    • ‘Then why this sudden move to levy cess on all Central taxes?’
    • ‘Mandated by Common Minimum Programme, the Budget proposes a levy of two per cent cess on income tax, corporation tax, excise duties, customs duties and service tax.’
    • ‘Now, another shocker awaits them - in the form of infrastructure and Sold Waste Management cesses to be levied from April 1.’
    • ‘If cable operators are forced to declare households honestly, will broadcasters be asked to pay a cess to defray the burden of maintaining the last mile access which makes it possible for their channels to be viewed in India?’
    • ‘Property tax assesses of BMP can remit their SWM cess along with property tax returns.’
    • ‘But to confirm her fears, several companies have hiked prices, effectively passing on the education cess to customers.’
    • ‘The Centre today proposed to levy a cess of 2 per cent on income tax, corporation tax, excise and customs duties and service tax to give a boost to primary education in the country.’
    • ‘The service tax and the cess on each banking transaction will hit everyone badly.’
    • ‘A cess can also be levied on these investments, which can be used to fund a social security net for construction workers.’
    • ‘Instead of relief in taxes, the salaried class will have to pay a cess at the rate of 2 per cent.’
    • ‘In the long run, we need to think of making the services cheaper and introducing a public-transportation cess on private vehicles to cross-subsidise the system.’
    • ‘On the flip side, the increasing number of vehicles has brought in substantial revenue for the State, which incidentally levies the highest road taxes and various other cesses in the country.’
    • ‘The Health Ministry too considered the proposal at various stages during 1994-2000 and drafted a bill for the creation of the Authority to be funded by levying a cess as envisaged.’
    • ‘A Bangalore Improvement Trust funded through a cess levied on Bangaloreans could be one solution if there is total transparency in collection, conceptualisation and implementation.’
    • ‘He explained in detail the applicability of education cess on excise duty and service tax.’
    • ‘Taking a dig at the BWSSB, a corporator noted perhaps a cess should be levied on BWSSB every time sewage is let into storm water drains maintained by the BMP.’
    • ‘They have been paying for a dream metro rail to solve their problems since 1995 through the infrastructure cess on petrol and diesel.’
    • ‘The increase in service tax and a new cess will put an additional burden on the common man.’
    • ‘Beag has also pointed out that the public was being forced to pay twice; first through the cess being levied on the petrol or diesel for road widening and then again through the toll.’
    • ‘I propose to levy a cess of 2 per cent on income tax, corporation tax, excise duties, customs duties and service tax.’
    levy, tariff, duty, toll, excise, impost, contribution, assessment, tribute, tithe, charge, fee
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting the obligation placed on the Irish to supply the Lord Deputy's household and garrison with provisions at prices ‘assessed’ by the government): shortened from the obsolete noun assess ‘assessment’.

Pronunciation

cess

/sɛs//ses/

Main definitions of cess in English

: cess1cess2

cess2

noun

in phrase bad cess to
Irish
  • A curse on.

    ‘bad cess to the day I joined that band!’
    • ‘It's nothing but vandalism and bad cess to them that wield the spray cans.’
    • ‘And good riddance and bad cess to him, he said.’
    • ‘And bad cess to those dunderheads who insist the Earth is round, too!’
    • ‘I feel for him because the sad thing is that, where a few years ago we were falling over great folk music, now it must be sought out, bad cess to the ubiquitous keyboard that hides a full orchestra in a few well-chosen buttons.’
    • ‘In the 2004 Presidential election I sat home on my hands and wished bad cess to all the candidates.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (originally Anglo-Irish): perhaps from cess.

Pronunciation

cess

/sɛs//ses/