Definition of centrality in US English:

centrality

noun

  • 1The quality or fact of being in the middle of somewhere or something.

    1. 1.1 The state of being accessible from a variety of places.
      ‘he believes that the location's centrality can only be an added advantage for guests’
      • ‘Geographic centrality in the region and the cities' substantial telecommunications and logistical infrastructure have been most attractive.’
      • ‘This research evaluates changes in the centrality of hubs in the international airline industry from 1984 to 1996.’
      • ‘The greater absolute centrality of cities in the periphery often derived from changes in the centrality of major European, American, or Asian hubs.’
      • ‘In this case, geographic centrality will be outweighed by production costs.’
      • ‘Some places are favored by their centrality, while others are disadvantaged by their comparative isolation.’
      • ‘Among these gateways, some places enjoy high levels of centrality and concomitant accessibility.’
      • ‘He chose Munich for its musical quality and European centrality.’
      • ‘The motive of this move was Madrid's centrality.’
      • ‘The author estimates indices of centrality for hubs around the world.’
      • ‘We expanded our focus to include their distinctive features—in this case, the particular centrality of the land nexus.’
  • 2The quality of being essential or of the greatest importance.

    ‘the centrality of religion in their lives’
    ‘the centrality and sovereignty of the state’
    • ‘His top billing is a function of his stature in Japanese cinema, not the centrality of his role in the film.’
    • ‘His hostility at least has the virtue of drawing attention to the centrality of law in Dickens's conception of his novel.’
    • ‘The centrality of teenagers in the market for contemporary cinema has been seen by some to disadvantage older adult audiences.’
    • ‘The centrality of marriage to a given society and to its sense of well being and solidarity is indicated by the pressure which is exerted on the individual to conform.’
    • ‘It was a dream about the mind's centrality in the created world.’
    • ‘Her novel attests to the centrality of religious symbolism in the formation of ethnic identities.’
    • ‘A noteworthy feature in a number of the religious paintings cited here is the centrality of babies to the subjects portrayed.’
    • ‘The origins of these systems are the fruit of a rationalization proper to the management of European centrality in the world system.’
    • ‘She traces the dominant themes of traditional gender roles, education, and the centrality of the family in Italian-American women's literature.’
    • ‘They have shown how fallible is our belief in the centrality of human values.’

Pronunciation

centrality

/sɛnˈtrælədi//senˈtralədē/