Definition of cecum in English:

cecum

(British caecum)

noun

Anatomy
  • A pouch connected to the junction of the small and large intestines.

    • ‘The digestive tract was removed from each specimen and dissected it into the upper digestive tract, gizzard, small intestine, ceca, large intestine, liver, and pancreas.’
    • ‘In the right lower quadrant you are feeling mainly for the terminal ileum, the cecum, and the ascending colon, and for the descending colon in the left.’
    • ‘The appendix, a worm-like appendage of dubious usefulness, usually hangs straight down from the first portion of the large intestine, the cecum.’
    • ‘The portion of the large intestine - between the cecum and transverse colon - that starts on the right side of the abdomen and moves up toward the liver.’
    • ‘Total digestive tract mass was the summed masses of the upper digestive tract, gizzard, small intestine, ceca, and large intestine.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin (intestinum) caecum blind (gut) translation of Greek tuphlon enteron.

Pronunciation:

cecum

/ˈsēkəm/