Definition of cautious in English:

cautious

adjective

  • 1(of a person) careful to avoid potential problems or dangers.

    ‘a cautious driver’
    • ‘He also warned the public to be cautious and to book any foreign travel with recognised and regulated travel agents.’
    • ‘We have been careful and cautious: we don't have Scottish in our name for nothing.’
    • ‘Economists were more cautious when making forecasts of the impact of the rising oil prices.’
    • ‘Nowadays, you've got to be as cautious with your email address as with your home address.’
    • ‘So ignore commentators' advice to be more politically correct, more cautious, more bland.’
    • ‘In my view, we are very lucky to have a very prudent and cautious Minister of Finance.’
    • ‘But while enjoying different foods and customs, she is also learning when to be cautious.’
    • ‘However, when it comes to holiday spending, we are just that little bit more cautious.’
    • ‘But they were more cautious, fearing a challenge which might destabilise the bank.’
    • ‘Perhaps that means they should be more wary and cautious in the future.’
    • ‘Perhaps the media has simply become more cautious since the days of the dot-com bust.’
    • ‘Most pickpockets are cautious thieves hoping to avoid any kind of confrontation.’
    • ‘You know that there are people and situations in your life that you need to be cautious and careful about.’
    • ‘You never know, the council may even be a little more cautious before it offers up another bit of open space to developers.’
    • ‘Luckily she is a infuriatingly cautious driver, otherwise she could have been a goner.’
    • ‘After months of being cautious and playing hard to get, I'm going to bravely risk rejection this time.’
    • ‘My dad was always very careful and he has advised me not to be too cautious and end up with money I don't know what to do with.’
    • ‘The second reason to be cautious is that there is no effective mechanism for dealing with global imbalances.’
    • ‘Owning to the severe winter, the zoo staff is being extra cautious with animals.’
    • ‘A spokesman for the AA urged drivers to be cautious, warning of black ice on the roads.’
    careful, wary, aware, heedful, attentive, alert, watchful, vigilant, circumspect, prudent, guarded, on one's guard, chary, mindful
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an action) characterized by the desire to avoid potential problems.
      ‘the plan received a cautious welcome’
      • ‘So those who are attached to the cautious approach will hold back nervously rather than boldly promote growth.’
      • ‘We were very concerned to ensure that any opening of the courts was careful and cautious.’
      • ‘I even have a cautious optimism that some such changes could benefit Catholic life.’
      • ‘Chairman Sir Michael Bett welcomed the results, despite a cautious note about the size of margins.’
      • ‘The county council wants the Government to allow North Yorkshire to adopt a more cautious approach.’
      • ‘Tendring Council has given cautious approval to the Bathside Bay proposals.’
      • ‘Traders in Wood Street in Old Town have given a cautious welcome to a parking meter that arrived two weeks ago.’
      • ‘His findings, though cautious and conservative, are nevertheless provocative.’
      • ‘Initial reaction from the couple was cautious but the breakthrough of the arrest was evident on their faces.’
      • ‘At last, in cautious murmurs, they own up that they are wide awake, and far from tranquil.’
      • ‘Blunkett's language may have been cautious, but his bravery wasn't in doubt.’
      • ‘I think it is because we are a comfortable society that moves in cautious steps.’
      • ‘The Pope's cautious reaction to martial law was prompted by his firm belief in non-violence.’
      • ‘Vale of York MP Anne McIntosh takes a slightly more cautious line than her leader.’
      • ‘Campaigners have given a cautious welcome to news that a Witham community centre looks likely to be saved.’
      • ‘The attitudes many of these young people had developed were both cautious and illiberal.’
      • ‘Their overly cautious policy is one that they will pay for in the end.’
      • ‘The budget proposed for Basildon has been given a cautious but warm welcome by residents.’
      • ‘But the scheme has received a cautious welcome from traders and business groups.’
      • ‘Bradford's new Gala Casino opened its doors yesterday to a cautious welcome from some.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from caution, on the pattern of pairs such as ambition, ambitious.

Pronunciation

cautious

/ˈkôSHəs//ˈkɔʃəs/