Definition of categorization in US English:

categorization

(British categorisation)

noun

  • 1The action or process of placing into classes or groups.

    ‘categorization by topic’
    • ‘For the categorization to be useful, the leaf categories on the tree should contain less than one page or 20 references each.’
    • ‘This highly popular spy show still continues to defy easy categorization.’
    • ‘He said the government should have given betel-nut palms a clear categorization much earlier.’
    • ‘The purpose of the factor analysis was to provide a deeper, more meaningful categorization of skills, rather than a rank list of skills.’
    • ‘Initially, each idea was listed separately without categorization.’
    • ‘Like all movie stars, she is unique, itching to fit in a category, yet somehow beyond categorization.’
    • ‘Categorization was challenging because most resources contained a wide variety of information.’
    • ‘Its text and illuminations, unique in both style and subject matter, elude literary and art historical categorization.’
    • ‘Humans are naturally good at categorization.’
    • ‘The odd sculptures he made in his final decades continue to defy categorization or placement in any firm art-historical niche.’
    1. 1.1 A system of classes into which something is sorted.
      ‘categorizations in music’
      • ‘Prior categorizations of improvisational intensity have often merged these qualities.’
      • ‘It is amusing to me how Americans are attracted to simple categorizations.’
      • ‘Certainly, these categorizations could be insulting for some.’
      • ‘His ignorance of not completely "granting the natives human status" leads him to social categorization.’
      • ‘The result is that the moral absolutism claimed by legal categorizations are avoided and the validity of both sides is maintained.’
      • ‘Future research needs to more clearly delimit variability within broad-band categorizations of behavior problems.’
      • ‘The categorizations are somewhat arbitrary, but our analysis tends toward conservative estimation of the number of genes showing these patterns.’
      • ‘We ensured that the categorizations were based only on skin tone by altering the lightness and darkness in the photos.’
      • ‘Giving strict scrutiny to all religious categorizations, regardless of motivation, would have effectively overruled him.’
      • ‘These categorizations are obviously open to refinement.’

Pronunciation