Main definitions of cast in English

: cast1cast2



  • 1[with object] Throw (something) forcefully in a specified direction.

    ‘lemmings cast themselves off the cliff’
    figurative ‘individuals who do not accept the norms are cast out from the group’
    • ‘With that, she took the plunge into the Thames and was soon among her fellow athletes, bobbing along like beads cast into the water.’
    • ‘There was to be no happy ending as her husband suddenly died leaving her a widow, a desperate state for any Indian woman as it cast her out of society and made her a non-person.’
    • ‘The preceding verses establish the fact that Satan was cast out of heaven.’
    • ‘She cast it aside forcefully and with stony eyes, turned to Dimitri.’
    • ‘The dead had long since been cast over the side, their scant possessions and weapons cradled in their embrace.’
    • ‘I have had very close friends in the fishing community basically cast me out of their circles for criticizing commercial fishers.’
    • ‘They give up their particular claim to sovereignty and cast themselves on the waters.’
    • ‘Our forebears were cast out from their homeland by the ruling class.’
    • ‘In this kind of world, the weak and feeble minded are cast to the side to die an unambiguous death, while the strong and wise go on to live a fruitful, long life.’
    • ‘While your heart may be set on the University of Michigan or Yale, cast your net wide.’
    • ‘In short, historians very often have to cast their research net a lot wider in order to find evidence relating to a particular topic.’
    • ‘The book casts its net widely, aiming at different demographics.’
    • ‘When looking for inspiration he casts his net wide, with verses reflecting a wide range of ideas and affording readers a glimpse of his positive and often entertaining take on life.’
    • ‘Again, I have difficulty imagining anyone casting their contraceptives to the wind on hearing about this one.’
    • ‘That's a lot of bread that could have been cast upon the waters.’
    • ‘On putting it on she was cast into the water and later rescued.’
    • ‘Death and hell will be cast into the lake of fire.’
    • ‘He then took his books and staff and cast them into the sea, openly vowing to give up his long-held practice of sorcery.’
    • ‘So just as prisoners are cast out of mainstream society, prisons exist largely out of mainstream public life.’
    • ‘The priest dribbled wine on the lamb's head, and meal and salt, then cut off some of the wool from between the horns and cast that on the altar fire.’
    throw, toss, fling, pitch, hurl, bowl, dash, shy, lob, launch, flip, let fly, direct, discharge, project, propel, send
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    1. 1.1Throw (something) so as to cause it to spread over an area.
      ‘the fishermen cast a large net around a school of tuna’
      figurative ‘he cast his net far and wide in search of evidence’
    2. 1.2Direct (one's eyes or a look) at something.
      ‘she cast down her eyes’
      [with two objects] ‘she cast him a desperate glance’
      • ‘I am older, wiser, and have trained myself to cast a critical cold eye on absolutely everything, including my past self.’
      • ‘The doctor lowered his weapon as his eyes cast a cold look around the camp.’
      • ‘Ryann cast him a mournful glance, before walking back to the kitchen.’
      • ‘Toby shook his head and cast a quick, worried glance in Indy's direction.’
      • ‘Phin raised an eyebrow before shifting Steph off his shoulder and turning onto his side, casting Dev another thoughtful glance.’
      • ‘We averted our eyes, from time to time casting a shifty glance in his direction.’
      • ‘Some were whispering furiously, casting scared glances over their shoulders.’
      • ‘The sailors cluster together nervously, casting frightened glances towards the nearby dark trees.’
      • ‘The anxious looks they cast backwards were not directed at her.’
      • ‘He kept looking in my direction, casting hateful glares.’
      • ‘Cooper crossed his arms over his chest, his eyes still cast downward.’
      • ‘Jeremy cast a desperate look over his shoulder - where were the cameras?’
      • ‘She hesitated, cast her eyes downward, and looked inexplicably sad.’
      • ‘I look at him and nod before casting my eyes to the ground.’
      • ‘Before he left he cast a look around his immaculate house, his sharp eyes scanning every corner.’
      • ‘Sydney looks away, casting her eyes to the side rather than returning the gaze.’
      • ‘He walked up the stairs and found Rena sitting on his bed and her eyes were cast down.’
      • ‘When I looked out of the kitchen window these two were casting a watchful eye over the boys' activities.’
      • ‘Her touch, the hint - no more than that - of her body against mine, and the looks she occasionally cast up at me were all utterly, utterly feminine.’
      • ‘Judy narrowed her eyes, cast a critical look at the laughing woman standing next to a small, plump girl, and threw the picture in the box.’
      • ‘Whenever colleagues walk by my desk, they cast worried looks my way.’
      direct, shoot, turn, throw, send, dart, bestow, give
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    3. 1.3Throw the hooked and baited end of (a fishing line) out into the water.
      • ‘He had more chance of catching something in a jam jar than where he had cast his lines but we didn't have the heart to nip back and tell him.’
      • ‘Two men are sitting on the jetty, fixing bait to hooks and casting fishing-lines out into the water, chatting quietly in Spanish and sipping from bottles of Corona.’
      • ‘Even at that hour, the bay was already dotted with the boats of fishermen casting their lines.’
      • ‘Many a man will cast a line with several hooks hoping that at least one fish will bite, some play it courageously with all their luck on one hook.’
      • ‘Many cast a line off the stern door at night to fish, sometimes not that successfully.’
      • ‘They were casting fishing lines into the water.’
      • ‘Lovely it was - with fishermen on the rocks in each little inlet, happily casting their lines, sipping on a beer, gazing at the sea.’
      • ‘It is an all too common fallacy that anglers fishing havens such as the Ebro only have to bait a line, cast it in and the fish, both large and numerous will duly oblige!’
      • ‘Good thing, too, as we observe two fishermen casting lines nearby.’
      • ‘A mid-sized rig loomed in the distance, floating on the water with several fishing lines cast over the sides.’
    4. 1.4Register (a vote)
      ‘residents turned out in record numbers to cast their votes’
      • ‘Bolton election staff have started opening postal ballots already cast by voters in the General Election.’
      • ‘The votes have been cast and the deadline of May 15 has long passed.’
      • ‘Ballot boxes will be left to gather dust in the June elections, as every vote will be cast by post.’
      • ‘The poll was run from the council's website and votes could be cast either by computer or a mobile phone.’
      • ‘Reaching the age of eighteen was quite significant for me, as it allowed me the opportunity to cast my first parliamentary vote.’
      • ‘This is the first time that the union has has cast such a vote.’
      • ‘A total of 11,417 votes were cast in favour of a strike and 4,316 were cast against.’
      • ‘On Saturday week, 600,000 young people will cast their first ever vote in a federal election.’
      • ‘The company needs to gain 75 per cent of the vote that is cast at a general meeting in August.’
      • ‘Such activities disenfranchise those who properly register to vote and cast valid ballots.’
      • ‘Each person will have their own unique polling number which will give them access to each service, ensuring that fraudulent votes cannot be cast.’
      • ‘Postal votes can be cast any time until and including June 10, providing they are received by 10 pm at the address on the return envelope.’
      • ‘A vast number of early votes and absentee votes have been cast.’
      • ‘The 488 voters cast 2,226 votes for 454 different books about Montana.’
      • ‘That forces us to consider the votes that were not cast.’
      • ‘The votes have been cast and the winners of the Croydon Champion Art Challenge have been chosen.’
      • ‘By lunchtime, across East Timor, four out of five of those who had registered had cast their votes.’
      • ‘It is, of course, utterly presumptuous to declare the race over before a single vote has been cast.’
      • ‘The bill is silent on how votes will be cast, including the possibility of postal ballots.’
      • ‘Fears that insufficient votes would be cast persisted up until the referendum took place on February 20.’
      register, record, enter, file, lodge, post, set down, vote
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    5. 1.5Hunting Let loose (hounds) on a scent.
      • ‘The huntsman casts the hounds usually with the wind at his back.’
      • ‘If the hounds do not by themselves recover the line, the huntsman will try to assist by ‘em>casting’ the pack in the direction which his experience tells him that the hare may have taken.’
      • ‘Casting the hounds into the cover we stood on the edge of a steep gorge and listened for a sound of the hounds working.’
      • ‘When the pack loses the scent, the huntsman will cast the hounds again.’
      • ‘Red-coated huntsmen drive and cast the dogs into promising spots with whoops and short blasts from a small fox horn.’
    6. 1.6Hunting [no object](of a dog) search in different directions for a lost scent.
      ‘the dog cast furiously for the vanished rabbit’
      • ‘We have a special field Master, who is giving a commentary to those who are introduced to it to explain to them why the hounds are casting, what they are doing and all the difficulties and so forth.’
      • ‘This gave the Field a chance to catch up while the hounds cast back and picked up the line without help from the Master.’
      • ‘The dogs were casting about, in search of a scent that was not there, obviously distressed.’
      • ‘Both dogs were casting in front of me when a mountain quail flushed from between my legs.’
      • ‘He sat up and looked to where the dogs cast for his trail.’
      • ‘Horses and men were standing all close together, while the hounds were casting for a scent.’
    7. 1.7Let down (an anchor or sounding line)
      • ‘As a result, the ship's captain decides to pull up the sails and cast anchor for awhile until the wind returns.’
      • ‘When the anchor was cast, he left the vessel with a purple face.’
      • ‘Other times, resupply stations are available for you to cast your anchor at for repairs.’
      • ‘This captain of the ship decides to cast anchor after leaving Java because of a storm.’
      • ‘Then fearing lest we should have fallen upon rocks, they cast four anchors out of the stern, and wished for the day.’
  • 2[with object] Cause (light or shadow) to appear on a surface.

    ‘the moon cast a pale light over the cottages’
    figurative ‘running costs were already casting a shadow over the program’
    • ‘The room was dark except for the light from the computer monitor, which cast a ghostly blue shade on the mother and daughter's faces.’
    • ‘The emotional meeting cast new light on the islanders' historic role and the impact their brief meeting with Kennedy had on their lives.’
    • ‘Its rays of light cast eerie shadows that danced on the wall and the ceiling.’
    • ‘The sun cast a golden radiance upon the grey-green waters of the Atlantic Ocean.’
    • ‘The figure loomed mysteriously in the shadows casting a long shadow from a street lamp.’
    • ‘Helmet-mounted lights cast less shadow, which can mess with your depth perception.’
    • ‘The moon cast shadows of silver light, which lay in pools on the bedspread.’
    • ‘The glow still present, the figure turned, revolving, and the dim light cast a monstrous shadow of it on the trunk of a tree nearby.’
    • ‘When we reach the waterline, the full moon has risen, casting steely light over the boulders that Graham has strategically positioned along the shore.’
    • ‘During a solar eclipse the Moon moves across the Sun, blocking its light and casting a shadow onto the Earth.’
    • ‘The posters were lit softly in the light, shadows cast in the corners farthest from the window.’
    • ‘It is still casting a shadow over the whole perception of the council - the honourable thing would have been for him to resign.’
    • ‘She's standing beside an electric sign, which casts a blue and red glow onto her willowy frame.’
    • ‘We have new blinds to put up when we're finished decorating, but in the meantime we've tacked an old sheet across the window to stop people from looking in, and it's casting an eerie blue glow around the room.’
    • ‘His family was decimated by tuberculosis, casting a shadow over the rest of his life and career.’
    • ‘The unremitting whiteness of the walls is anchored by a black marble floor that casts seductive glossy reflections and will age gracefully despite intense use.’
    • ‘Before long I laid down and fell asleep, the sun still casting a red glow over the horizon.’
    • ‘It will also fuel inflation, which is already casting a shadow over economic forecasts.’
    • ‘Beneath the cloudy sky, the green and blue shade cast by the giant trees fell in a mottled pattern on the forest floor.’
    • ‘At the same time, higher interest rates are casting a shadow over the housing market.’
    emit, give off, send out, send forth, shed, radiate, diffuse, spread out
    form, create, make, produce, cause
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Cause (uncertainty or disparagement) to be associated with something.
      ‘journalists cast doubt on the government's version of events’
      ‘I do not wish to cast aspersions on your honesty’
      • ‘Parent groups also cast doubt on whether the idea was practical and whether it would have the desired effect.’
      • ‘The police cast doubt on this story by painstaking work with the records of mobile phone companies.’
      • ‘Both British and German intelligence officials cast doubt on the story.’
      • ‘Some scientific experts cast doubt on the letter's authenticity.’
      • ‘Research in Glasgow has cast doubt on the mental and physical tasks that police have been using for three years to try to crack down on what is feared to be an epidemic of drug driving.’
      • ‘Defence officials, however, have cast doubt on the authenticity of the pictures.’
      • ‘But they also cast aspersions on women who choose prostitution as a profession, and did not mention the men.’
      • ‘But criminal law experts have cast doubt on whether her actions amount to a crime under English law, and a prosecution seems unlikely.’
      • ‘What happens when any party in the process notes questionable behavior that casts doubt on an individual's fitness for ministry?’
      • ‘Right from the outset, the police cast doubt on the sabotage theory.’
      • ‘Legal advisors also cast doubt on the usefulness of evidence arising from the disappeared witness.’
      • ‘Recent evidence has cast doubt on the link between nitrates and stomach cancer.’
      • ‘Recent studies cast doubt on the clinical value of school-based screening programs.’
      • ‘Nor have I any intention of casting aspersions against whichever 20 writers make the list in January.’
      • ‘Aspersions were also cast over his longevity at the highest level of the game.’
      • ‘The trials cast doubt on the official departmental line that the risk of a return of foot and mouth is ‘unlikely’.’
      • ‘But other nutrition experts cast doubt on whether fasting should be reintroduced as a weight-loss technique.’
      • ‘In this case, the borrower's credit history has cast doubt on his repayment capacity.’
      • ‘The larger cost, however, is that a great specter of doubt has been cast over almost every drug manufacturer in the country.’
      • ‘From time to time people cast doubt on the ability of such ancient texts to speak to people so far removed in time.’
    2. 2.2Cause (a magic spell) to take effect.
      ‘the witch cast a spell on her to turn her into a beast’
      figurative ‘the city casts a spell on the visitor’
      • ‘Inside the ‘wagon’ it lay bare except for some crates of different things used for casting spells.’
      • ‘Without adequate meditation, she wouldn't have enough magic energy to cast a spell.’
      • ‘She then casts a sleep spell on the soldiers, too see what happens next.’
      • ‘In Corsica it's difficult to decide whether it's the coastline or the interior which casts the strongest spell.’
      • ‘A spell will be cast and he will become a squirrel for the rest of his life.’
      • ‘A marriage certificate does not cast a magic spell of protection.’
      • ‘I shall cast a magic spell to transport us from the confines of these walls!’
      • ‘I had tried to cast the very spell I had vowed never to use again on another human.’
      • ‘But, Laura says, spells must not be cast to do harm.’
      • ‘As depicted in a variety of Chinese-language thrillers, magic spells are cast by drawing special words or symbols on a piece of paper or in the air.’
      • ‘By the time I came to work for Michael and Jan, their eighty acres had cast such a spell on them that they did not feel at ease anywhere else.’
      • ‘Offering these items is a sign of friendliness on the part of those who give them, while accepting or requesting them indicates trust that a spell has not been cast over them.’
      • ‘If all spells could be cast with just the wave of a hand, only chaos would come from it.’
      • ‘One of these spells, when cast successfully, can pretty well turn the tide of battle.’
      • ‘A pint-sized Messiah with scary eyes and an unkempt beard, he throws tantrums rather than casting a spell.’
      • ‘He was running low on his magic, but he was determined to cast one more spell.’
      • ‘Her child, who would be born with the ability to wield magic, would not cast a single spell until certain conditions were met.’
      • ‘The spell that had been cast over him was gone and she'd been the one to break it.’
      • ‘An albino displayed in Paris in 1744 at an exhibition cast such a spell over the public that even Voltaire wrote an extensive description of the case.’
      • ‘Helen said that if someone needed a spell she would cast one provided there was a good enough reason.’
      bewitch, enchant
      curse, jinx, witch
      point the bone at
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  • 3[with object] Discard.

    ‘the issue was cast from the list of concerns’
    • ‘You don't know whether to cast caution to the wind and make an offer, or wait to see if something better comes along.’
    • ‘And those that are intended to amuse oneself at the cost of others should definitely be cast away on the rubbish heap.’
    • ‘Across the globe, attempts to cast off the shackles of capitalist oppression met similar fates.’
    • ‘If I cast from my mind every malefaction our people have committed, I will become a malefactor myself.’
    • ‘What percentage of the population has been cast away, not counted any more as unemployed, although they are unemployed, and in need of employment?’
    • ‘All past acquaintanceships, friendships, love affairs, punch-ups, and the like must be cast from the judges' minds.’
    • ‘But when the last one ended, that anxiety was cast away.’
    • ‘That was the year when, casting off her teen-pop image, she scandalised polite society with the video for her new single.’
    • ‘The English department is a living graveyard of all the dead and discredited ideologies that have been cast off by other departments.’
    • ‘Yet both courtyards call the resident gardeners to cast off clippers and broom and live in the garden itself: welcoming friends, soaking up sunshine, cherishing solitude.’
    • ‘After a few months in the goldfields, he had cast off genteel reserve and adopted the confident, tough-guy pose suited to his new status as a brash fortune-seeker.’
    • ‘Plastic everything was cast away everywhere, along with old one-of-a-kind sneakers, worn out towels and pieces of clothing.’
    • ‘Too often, graphic novels are cast off as nothing more than kid stuff, pronounced so be people who say the word comics with a sneer.’
    • ‘His observations revealed that the two creatures were in fact one and the same: the adult develops inside the swimming larva, whose body is cast away when the adult takes up residence on the seabed.’
    • ‘Once she casts off the self-parodying gloom of her early scenes, we see why she is so often called ‘luminous.’’
    • ‘Of late I have cast my caution to the winds and ventured an answer to this most impossible of questions.’
    • ‘I would note, in addition, that Milton casts off metaphor in favor of ever more direct comments about families.’
    discard, reject, cast away, throw away, cast out, throw out, dispense with, get rid of, dispose of, abandon
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    1. 3.1Shed (skin or horns) in the process of growth.
      ‘the antlers are cast each year’
      • ‘The male roe deer casts its antlers every winter.’
      • ‘A film of liquid develops between the two layers of skin, which later makes it easier for the animal to cast its skin.’
      • ‘Bed bugs cast their skin each time they grow.’
      • ‘The moose had started to cast their horns about Christmas time.’
      • ‘Lice seen on chairs, pillows, and hats are dead, sick, or elderly or are cast skins of lice - these cannot infect a person.’
      shed, discard, slough off, throw off, get rid of, let fall, let drop
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2(of a horse) lose (a shoe)
      • ‘Tied to his saddle is a sponge, for cooling him down, and a bag packed with hi - tech equine electrolytes, snacks and the horse equivalent of a spare tyre, a rubber boot in case he casts a shoe.’
      • ‘When his horse cast two shoes, he stopped at a farm to have them replaced and dallied there afterward for several minutes to avoid going out in a heavy shower.’
      • ‘Under normal conditions, if a horse has cast a shoe, I can get out in a day or two and put it back on.’
      • ‘The pony had cast its shoe and must be shod before next day.’
      • ‘Horsey people wonder how horses in books get ridden hundreds of miles without ever casting a shoe or eating more than a bit of grass during their time off.’
  • 4[with object] Shape (metal or other material) by pouring it into a mold while molten.

    • ‘Virtually all copper alloys can be cast successfully by the centrifugal casting process.’
    • ‘The background depicts a worker casting metal in a foundry's workshop.’
    • ‘Aluminum is one of the few metals that can be cast by all of the processes used in casting metals.’
    • ‘A variety of materials such as stone, metal, and sandy clays have been used to form the mould in which metal is cast.’
    • ‘It was also popular as a material for ornamentation, being versatile and easily shaped or cast into different patterns.’
    • ‘It casts molten silicon in moulds, just as metal components are cast.’
    • ‘Back in 1856, he patented a steel-making process for casting strip steel.’
    • ‘Steel can be cast into bars, strips, sheets, nails, spikes, wire, rods or pipes as needed by the end user.’
    • ‘Fondant can also be cast in moulds and allowed to set.’
    • ‘Pewter was used to make cheap jewellery and was cast in moulds made from antler, engraved Roman tiles and clay, although stamped pewter jewellery was also made.’
    • ‘Brooches were made either by hammering a piece of metal into the right shape or by casting molten metal in a mould.’
    • ‘He stared into space as his teacher explained the principles of casting metal into various shapes.’
    • ‘Cast iron is very versatile, as it can be poured into moulds when molten and cast into complicated shapes, but is very brittle.’
    mould, fashion, form, shape, model
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    1. 4.1Make (a molded object) by pouring metal or other material into a mold while molten.
      ‘a bell was cast for the church’
      • ‘Apart from being very difficult to cast a solid bronze figure without distortion, the weight would be a major problem.’
      • ‘The source for this date is found in a petition for a bell to be cast in the year 840.’
      • ‘A plaster mold was made when the body parts were to be cast in bronze metal because molten bronze would destroy a rubber mold.’
      • ‘Made in the last year of Hanson's life, this was the artist's first sculpture cast in bronze.’
      • ‘She then has these objects cast in metal to make them permanent.’
      • ‘Later he had his works cast in bronze and sometimes added elements in welded steel.’
      • ‘Simple shapes such as plates and spoons could be cast in a two-part mould, but complex forms such as tankards or flagons needed multi-part moulds.’
      • ‘The figurine could have been cast from a clay mould made with a bronze fitting of a jug handle or a steelyard weight.’
      • ‘For nearly a century, the text to be printed was cast in hot metal, using monotype to set single characters or linotype to set text line by line.’
      • ‘The dog, cast in bronze by a local sculptor, was erected in 1932 to commemorate the district's pioneer settlers.’
      • ‘Those who could afford it wore medals struck in silver, but the ordinary people purchased medals cast in less expensive metals.’
      • ‘Pins, buckles and discs were all being cast, but the moulds were mainly for penannular brooches.’
      • ‘In those days type was cast in hot metal on Linotype machines and if power was off, the metal went cold.’
      • ‘The Lord Lieutenant of East Yorkshire, Richard Marriott, travelled down to the foundry where the six bells have been cast to inspect them for himself.’
      • ‘Bells can be hollowed from wood or made from glass or ceramics, but most are cast or forged from metal.’
      • ‘When cast in bronze, the statue is expected to weigh a tonne.’
      • ‘Visitors were also shown vases that were cast from the same material and turned on a wood lathe.’
      • ‘And it is hoped the bells, which are to be cast in Holland, will be heard for the first time in September on the 150th anniversary of the founding of the village.’
      • ‘From these moulds he could then cast waxes to use as the masters for the bronze casting.’
      • ‘He appears to have devised a successful mould for casting regularly sized and spaced metal type, a heavy ink that would adhere to this type, and a variation of a press that would give an impression on paper.’
    2. 4.2Arrange and present in a specified form or style.
      ‘he issued statements cast in tones of reason’
      • ‘First, the rhetoric requires motherhood to be cast in unrealistically negative terms.’
      • ‘Behavior can usually be cast in positive or negative terms.’
      • ‘You don't see reporters cast in a good light anymore.’
      • ‘Will the resident antipathy towards America in other spheres be cast in the same style?’
      • ‘He has been cast in a certain way by his silence because he thought the right thing to do was to work with the police and not come on your show.’
    3. 4.3Calculate and record details of (a horoscope)
      • ‘At the end I asked her if I could cast her horoscope.’
      • ‘By 500BC, evidence of a Zodiac had been found and introduced, and personal horoscopes were being cast.’
      • ‘As Nick himself puts it, if this is how one sees astrology ‘one may just as easily roll a set of astro-dice as go to the bother of casting a horoscope’.’
      • ‘To cast your horoscope, your exact time, place, and date of birth is required.’
      • ‘It contains the blank forms/charts and instructions on how to cast your own natal chart.’
      calculate, devise, compute, reckon, determine, assess, work out, formulate, record, write
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  • 5[no object] (in country dancing) change one's position by moving a certain number of places in a certain direction along the outside of the line in which one is dancing.

    • ‘Bottom couple dance together up the middle of the set, and cast out and down the outside back to places.’
    • ‘Then the boy and the girl would cast down and circle with the bottom couple.’
    • ‘Come back up to where you started and cast round one couple to progress.’


  • 1An object made by shaping molten metal or similar material in a mold.

    ‘bronze casts of the sculpture’
    • ‘Among the other five pieces here are two compositions that are each shown in two versions - the original assemblage and a bronze cast.’
    • ‘The bronze depicted here is one of eight casts created in 1955.’
    • ‘Previously, like Rodin and his followers, Brancusi had modelled his sculptures in clay or plaster and then made bronze casts.’
    • ‘He once made a bronze cast of his own hand, which he used to grip a sapling.’
    • ‘A second bronze cast of the statue is at the top of the stairs in the Century Association.’
    • ‘They're everywhere; his signature, their presence captured in Snowdon's great 1988 photograph and in those ubiquitous casts in plaster and bronze.’
    • ‘His multi-figure bronze casts portray a breadline, an Appalachian farm couple and a man listening to one of FDR's fireside chats.’
    • ‘After the metal has cooled, the mould is broken open and the solid cast is now ready for use.’
    • ‘The room has a great light fixture, by Artemide, and truly original artwork in the cast of a broken piano that artist Leesa French found in a rubbish tip.’
    • ‘The garden's been maintained as she kept it and is full of her sculptures: from 1958, she kept back artist's casts of many of her bronzes, placing them here.’
    • ‘Each stage is also designated by a set of realistic casts of figures being born, getting married and so forth.’
    • ‘Sonja Landweer is exhibiting a series of bronze casts taken from ceramic moulds.’
    • ‘Maudslay must also have seen the superb casts of European sculptures exhibited in the Architectural Courts of the South Kensington Museum, which had opened in 1873.’
    • ‘Greece has promised to make casts of the sculptures for the British Museum and bear all the costs of returning them to Athens.’
    • ‘Peer at the piece very closely and you may just make out the traces of what look like scars on the surface of the cellulose paint which coats these two huge bronze casts.’
    • ‘However there is more than meets the eye as the sculpture is actually a bronze cast realistically painted.’
    • ‘It has casts of virtually all his sculptural work.’
    • ‘The rooms I like best are the ones that contain casts of all sorts of astonishing statues, monuments and sections of famous architecture.’
    • ‘There is no evidence of retouching to the cast, which suggests that the mould was of the highest quality.’
    1. 1.1A mold used to make an object by casting.
      • ‘When a metal enters a cast, it may appear to flow uniformly.’
      • ‘It is such a gratifying and easy task to chat about life and times using literary works as a basis, just as it is more gratifying and easier to copy from a plaster cast than to draw a living body.’
      • ‘When Elgin first went to Athens, his intention was simply to make a plaster cast of the sculptures.’
      • ‘The casts were then cut open and used as templates; the assemblages of welded rods are three-dimensional sketches of individuals in zigzags of bright white metal.’
      • ‘The break turned out to be fairly minor, as these things go, and since the bone was in a stabilised position, I didn't even need a cast.’
      • ‘The models began life sculpted in clay, before a plaster cast was used to mould the final version in glass fibre, with the knight and the totem pole finished to look like bronze, the helmet in iron.’
      • ‘These sheets are fed into large presses with casts shaped into a particular body panel, like a door, bonnet roof and bodies.’
      • ‘Molten metal flows in a white-hot stream into the giant cast for one of York Minster's six new bells.’
      • ‘Foundry staff, working on the new York Minster bells, pour molten metal into an underground cast.’
      • ‘Model eggs were made of plaster-of-Paris from casts of real cowbird eggs and painted with acrylic paints and polyurethane to mimic real cowbird eggs.’
      mould, die, form, matrix, shape, casting, template, pattern, frame
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    2. 1.2A bandage stiffened with plaster of Paris, molded to the shape of a limb that is broken, and used to support and protect it.
      • ‘Not all skiing accidents can be mended with a plaster cast or bandage.’
      • ‘Mom was lying in her bed, arm in a cast, and bandage on her forehead.’
      • ‘Every six weeks she had to go to hospital and have the casts changed under general anaesthetic to accommodate her growing frame.’
      • ‘He has had the cast removed from his broken arm and is now working on building up the muscle and on his overall conditioning.’
      • ‘Joshua, who is encased from hip to neck in a plaster cast to protect his weak bones, had a huge smile on his face throughout’
      • ‘We got him out of the plaster cast and he's been able to move his wrist freely at a very early stage.’
      • ‘He fractured four bones in his wrist and will wear a cast for three months before beginning physical therapy.’
      • ‘The girl was totally wrapped in casts and bandages.’
      • ‘After checking the x-rays, Rachael can see the wrist is broken and Sammy will need a plaster cast fitted.’
      • ‘Some members of this profession specialize in a narrow range of conditions, for example, bonesetters, who make casts and medicines for broken limbs.’
      • ‘I had just finished applying a cast to her fractured wrist.’
      • ‘At this point I noticed that the girl, who was about 18 years old, had her left leg in a cast from above the thigh to the bottom of her foot.’
      • ‘They put a plaster cast on my foot, right up to my knee.’
      • ‘Why aren't some types of broken bones put in casts right away?’
      • ‘I am having the plaster cast removed at the end of the week so I will be okay.’
      • ‘Orthopedic technologists traditionally remove casts and prepare types of traction.’
      • ‘He then saw a doctor, had his old plaster cast removed, had his leg re-plastered, had another x-ray and finally saw the doctor again, who checked the x-rays and told him he could go home - all of this in just under two hours.’
      • ‘The guy had one arm in a plaster cast and he's lucky it's not two now.’
      • ‘Just out of his body cast and into a metal brace, Patchen still lacked mobility and so began to look around for a house nearby.’
      • ‘In fact, he was so desperate to get back on to his bike that we had to tell the doctor a little lie to persuade him to remove the plaster cast.’
  • 2An act of throwing something forcefully.

    ‘he grabbed a spear for a third cast’
    • ‘His arm goes back for a mighty cast of the lance.’
    1. 2.1archaic At dice, a throw or a number thrown.
      • ‘His own fault he hides, as a cheat hides an unlucky cast of the die.’
      • ‘Players use the dice to score points without losing all their chips but a single strategic play of a card or lucky cast of the dice can turn the game around.’
      • ‘When they have lost all their money they will play for their houses, their land, and their wives even, whose destiny often depends on a cast of the dice.’
    2. 2.2Fishing A throw of a fishing line.
      • ‘After about ten casts Alf caught a trout and was delighted.’
      • ‘In the next four casts, I had four more pike averaging some six pounds.’
      • ‘On the third cast, I could see a wake behind the fly, but ran out of water before the fish would take.’
      • ‘After a few hopeful short casts, I punched out as far as possible, to the deeper channel, about twenty yards off the sandbar.’
      • ‘First cast, the fly landed lightly, then drifted downstream for about three yards.’
  • 3[with adjective] The form or appearance of something, especially someone's features or complexion.

    ‘she had a somewhat masculine cast of countenance’
    ‘the colors he wore emphasized the olive cast of his skin’
    • ‘He had been picked for the Western cast of his features and his ability to follow orders.’
    • ‘Most of the other, longer-wavelength colors of the Sun pass directly through the air, giving the Sun a yellowish cast.’
    • ‘He was eerily calm all of a sudden, but had a sinister cast to his features as he smirked.’
    • ‘The leaves often take on a bronze cast, making this plant all the more interesting.’
    • ‘She paused to look at him, and noticed something strange, an odd cast to his features.’
    • ‘He has a Slavic cast of feature, which he acknowledges helps him to adopt a cloak of invisibility.’
    1. 3.1The character of something.
      ‘this question is for minds of a more philosophical cast than mine’
      • ‘Needless to say, this puts a substantially different cast on things.’
      • ‘While much of the information Patterson covers is not new ground, there is a decidedly different cast to her research.’
      • ‘This leads to a confusion about the philosophical cast of mind of most people who vote Democrat.’
      • ‘It is most satisfying to the scientific cast of mind to suppose that a rule which is confirmed whenever it is tested will apply generally in all cases in which the relevant conditions are met.’
      • ‘Only die-hards or those of a philosophical cast of mind fail to see the futility of that.’
      • ‘His voice took on a low and serious cast.’
      type, sort, kind, variety, class, style, stamp, nature, manner, pattern, grain, mould, ilk, kidney, strain, brand, genre
      View synonyms
  • 4A slight squint.

    ‘he had a cast in one eye’
    • ‘She was short, with heavy thighs, bad legs, and a cast in one eye.’
    • ‘The man spoke with a slushy, unfamiliar accent; his nose was splayed to the left and he had a cast in his right eye.’
    • ‘He wore glasses to correct a slight cast and would never use one word where a novel would do.’
    squint, cross-eyes
    View synonyms
  • 5A convoluted mass of earth or sand ejected onto the surface by a burrowing worm.

    • ‘This is the yellow-faced blenny, often found in old tubeworm casts and even discarded shells.’
    • ‘The bacterial population of a cast is much greater than the bacterial population of either ingested soil, or the earthworm's gut.’
    • ‘There is one exception to this behaviour, and that is the specialised hermit crab Parugrita, which uses a crack in the reef or a discarded tubeworm cast as a home.’
    • ‘The removal of a cast leaves the channel open to direct water infiltration and might expose the worm to direct sunlight.’
    1. 5.1A pellet regurgitated by a hawk or owl.
  • 6A search made by a hound or pack of hounds over a wide area to find a trail.

    • ‘It is always great impertinence in a huntsman to pretend to make a cast himself, before the hounds have made theirs.’


  • be cast in a —— mold

    • (of a person) be of the type specified.

      ‘he was cast in a cautious mold’
      • ‘Our thinking throughout the Session of 1943 was cast in a serious mold, and the legislation it developed was geared to enabling the State of California and its people to make an outstanding contribution to victory and peace.’
      • ‘His arrest and deportation in 1907 was his first baptism in fire from which he emerged a high-minded statesman cast in a heroic mould.’
      • ‘His philosophy, his syntax, his lifestyle are all cast in a Biblical mold.’
      • ‘An adamantine character cast in a republican mold helped anchor his pedestal in the national pantheon.’
      • ‘He might have been cast in the mould of Baudelaire and Mallarmé, but it was Jean-Jacques Rousseau who was Finlay's real leading light.’
      • ‘From cradle to grave one is cast in the mould of fascismo and there can be no escape.’
      • ‘Hartson, cast in much the same mould as Hughes, put Wales on their way in Helsinki with the opener before Spurs' Simon Davies sealed victory 18 minutes from time.’
      • ‘On issues of economic and social policy he was, as an American diplomat put it, ‘cast in an Edwardian mould’.’
      • ‘In this respect, he was cast in a similar mould to Leonardo da Vinci.’
      • ‘Jenkins provides an extremely expressive treatment to Lil Armstrong's ‘Brown Gal’ with Doc Cheatham's trumpet firmly cast in a Louis Armstrong mold.’
  • cast adrift

  • cast one's bread upon the waters

    • Do good without expecting gratitude or reward.

      • ‘Once we have cast our bread upon the waters, the most we can do is wait.’
      • ‘In short, in true biblical fashion, the homily to which we are being treated is that we should cast our bread upon the waters in the hope - after not too many days - of hauling in a high-tech bakery!’
      • ‘But she cast her bread upon the waters by giving everyone she met her time and her kindness.’
      • ‘Cast your bread upon the waters, but do it confidently, not hesitatingly, remembering that you cast your bread upon the waters of baptism.’
      • ‘Anyway, the Bible enjoins us to cast our bread upon the waters, and in this case I got the wet bread back thirty years later.’
      • ‘Once you've cast your bread upon the waters, don't wait around for the responses to come back.’
      • ‘If you don't cast your bread upon the waters, it can't come back to you when you need it most.’
      • ‘The apostle had cast his bread upon the waters of Ilissus and Cephisus to find it after many days.’
      • ‘And we cast our bread upon the waters and fed the birds - ducks, swans, and fat pigeons on the banks.’
      • ‘When we cast our bread upon the waters, we can presume the someone downstream whose face we may never see will benefit from our action, even as we enjoy the gifts sent to us from a donor upstream.’
      • ‘We will cast our bread upon the waters and cheer the Chargers all the way.’
      • ‘To be on the safe side, we know on what side our bread is buttered, and we cast our bread upon the waters to ensure a fair share for all.’
      • ‘Often the best I can do personally is to cast my bread upon the waters and hope that it will feed somebody.’
      • ‘We are to cast our bread upon the waters, which may seem fruitless.’
      • ‘The Bible tells us to cast our bread upon the waters and it will return to us.’
      • ‘When we minister to the saints, when we cast our bread upon the waters, when we honor Him and His word, God will certainly bless us.’
      • ‘In my opinion Andy has cast his bread upon the waters, and according to the Good Book, it should come back to him seven-fold one of these days.’
      • ‘He cast his bread upon the waters, and deservedly it was returned to him in the love and affection of his family and friends.’
      • ‘That is why it has always been my greatest desire to get these poems out and to cast my bread upon the waters so to speak.’
      • ‘He sowed living seed, and he expected to reap a harvest from it; he cast his bread upon the waters, and he means to search and watch till he finds it again.’
  • cast one's eyes over

    • Have a quick appraising look at.

      ‘he was invited to cast his eyes over the exhibition’
      • ‘Representatives from local hockey clubs have been invited to attend to cast their eyes over the eight teams taking part.’
      • ‘We knew we were in for a treat as soon as we cast our eyes over the bar menu.’
      • ‘Huddles of people jostled around display boards to cast their eyes over proposals including raising the old railway bridge and building a new footbridge over the canal, allowing boats to travel its length.’
      • ‘However, having cast their eyes over a video of the incident, the Football Association have now dismissed his appeal.’
      • ‘That would give the administrators time to cast their eyes over the offers before Saturday, when it will finally be decided whether the club can be saved.’
      • ‘All the member had to do was cast his eyes over the bill in front of him.’
      • ‘The store's turmoil has led to a number of potential buyers casting their eyes over the company.’
      • ‘Involuntarily, she stepped in, biting the inside of her cheek apprehensively and casting her eyes over the rows of neatly aligned desks in the room.’
      • ‘I cast my eyes over the chocolate fabric of my knee-length pencil skirt for creases, finding none, and dipped my gaze to the conservative black of my kitten heels to check for scuff marks, which were also absent.’
      • ‘Investors who may be keen on some exposure to the retail sector should perhaps cast their eyes over grocers, which are generally fairly resilient to economic downturns.’
  • cast light on

  • cast lots

  • cast one's mind back

    • Think back to a particular event or time.

      ‘he cast his mind back to the fatal evening’
      • ‘I am sure that if the letter writer casts their mind back to their teenage years, they did not become a devil at 13 and an angel at 19.’
      • ‘Let's cast our mind back to other people who have been named and shamed - including John Leslie, the Hamiltons and Matthew Kelly - only to find out that they were innocent.’
      • ‘I was casting my mind back to that day when I wrote 4,000 words plus, at the end of which my brain had turned to sludge.’
      • ‘Naturally enough, such an important date made me cast my mind back in an attempt to remember the moment I received my A-level results, some twelve years ago.’
      • ‘Now cast your mind back to February and March of this year when the future of a football club and the hopes and dreams of thousands of fans hung in the balance.’
      • ‘If you think you are feeling the pinch of the cold January breeze this year, then take heart and cast your mind back to York winters past.’
      • ‘There would have been people out and about in the seafront area on the night he was attacked and we are asking people to cast their mind back to Friday, September 17 and try and remember if they saw John.’
      • ‘I cast my mind back to that roomful of smart, polished people of position, all radiating effortless composure and calm confidence, walking around, smiling and nodding at each other.’
      • ‘Maeve casts her mind back to the night Frances was crowned the Rose of Sligo and speaks with pride of her youngest daughter.’
      • ‘I should have cast my mind back to the months I spent travelling around Turkey.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • cast about (or around)

    • Search far and wide (physically or mentally)

      ‘he is restlessly casting about for novelties’
      • ‘He casts around for an answer but they would all have to start with ‘I am ‘and he just can't do it.’
      • ‘A biographer in search of a subject must usually cast about among people who have achieved something.’
      • ‘He champions what looks suspiciously like a lost cause, courts clubs who have no sympathy for his plight and casts about for players who don't exist.’
      • ‘The American obsession with dieting dates back to 1961, when a housewife who was seriously obese began casting around for diets.’
      • ‘I know it is completely unrealistic, because formally I am not searching, I cast about with my eyes.’
      • ‘And, if one casts around the world today, one notices the two powers with the worst prospects are the ones most advanced in their post-religiosity.’
      • ‘Following the phenomenal success of both The Mummy and The Mummy Returns, writer/director Stephen Sommers was casting around for a change of pace.’
      • ‘While I've been casting around for reasons to undergo blood transfusions, my father took the time to become genuinely ill.’
      • ‘When the town casts around for someone to blame Vernon is the best available candidate.’
      • ‘This is an exciting prospect for someone who's casting around for something to do when her contract's up.’
  • cast aside

    • Discard or reject.

      ‘they cast aside the principles of their youth’
      • ‘But all doubts were cast aside when she saw him there in his jeans and t-shirt waiting for her.’
      • ‘Bad policy is bad policy, and should be cast aside like leftover picnic mayonnaise.’
      • ‘I laugh at the bees as I snap their pictures, finally casting aside a life-long fear of them to look at their fat bodies dusted in pollen.’
      • ‘Should I cast the To Do list aside and just enjoy myself today?’
      • ‘But other conservatives are crying foul, saying that the law casts aside their federalist principles.’
      • ‘Although it has cast aside its membership requirements, the club still has a strict dress code.’
      • ‘He casts aside previous thinking too casually, leaving readers who are unfamiliar with what has been written on the subject with a misleading impression.’
      • ‘At least we wouldn't be casting aside international law and ‘going it alone.’’
      • ‘Are Security Council resolutions to be honored and enforced or cast aside without consequence?’
      • ‘As Americans crowded into the divorce courts, they were casting aside the complex - and demanding - vision of the Founders.’
  • be cast away

    • Be stranded after a shipwreck.

      • ‘Already trapped in Fenno-arevo was a small party of slave traders who had also had the misfortune to be cast away on Madagascar's inhospitable south coast after an encounter with pirates.’
      • ‘Sometimes, like in a scene on the Cayman Islands when he meets an old man who has been cast away, it seems as if he might spare a paragraph or two for an emotional response.’
      • ‘Every year a school class picked at random will be cast away on an abandoned island to fight it out amongst themselves.’
      • ‘Guests on the programme select the luxury item they would need to make their lives a little easier if they were cast away.’
      • ‘Cast away once, onto the desert island, he finds himself cast away again, by his former love.’
      • ‘John was cast away on the island of Patmos.’
      • ‘While heading home to England, he is cast away on an island, which its geographical proximity to the Americas closely resembles the one in Crusoe.’
      • ‘If you are going to be cast away, Robinson Crusoe island is a good place to be.’
      • ‘She plays a spoiled rich wife cast away on a desert island with her hunk of a servant, and they seem to smack each other around a lot.’
      shipwreck, wreck
      strand, leave stranded, maroon, cast ashore, abandon, leave behind, leave
      leave high and dry
      View synonyms
  • be cast down

    • Feel depressed.

      ‘she was greatly cast down by abusive criticism of her novels’
      • ‘After a brief fillip Wall Street went into retreat, cast down by sombre corporate trading news from a range of companies.’
      • ‘They were a group of men who were very distressed, very cast down by their illness and its difficulties.’
      • ‘I was either cast down and disappointed, or raised up and elated, depending on whether I was feeling better or worse.’
      • ‘Revived by American aid and by its own exertions, western Germany was more transformed by post-war economic and psychological recovery than it had been cast down by military defeat.’
      • ‘This doesn't mean I was a bully, it was just that people couldn't get me down the way other teens would be cast down.’
      • ‘After the birth of Ross, both were cast down and depressed.’
      • ‘The joyful ones also tend to draw more friends, who would rather bathe in the sunshine of happiness than to be cast down into a gloomy depression.’
      • ‘Take advantage of opportunities, don't be cast down, but rise to the challenge if it does occur’
      • ‘Far from being cast down by the goal, England concentrated on reaching half-time without falling further behind before switching to the attack with renewed vigour.’
      depressed, downcast, unhappy, sad, miserable, gloomy, down, low, blue, melancholy, doleful, mournful
      dejected, dispirited, discouraged, disheartened, downhearted, demoralized, daunted, dismayed, desolate, disconsolate, crestfallen, crushed, sapped, shaken, undermined, despondent, weighed down, oppressed, wretched
      View synonyms
  • cast off (or cast something off)

    • 1Knitting
      Take the stitches off the needle by looping each over the next to finish the edge.

      • ‘It was just an experiment piece - where I tried to remember how to knit, purl, cast off, increase and decrease etc.’
      • ‘Sleeves - why does the pattern tell me to mark the rows and then knit 4 or 5 more rows before casting off?’
      • ‘Somewhere over the Atlantic on Thursday night, I cast off the last stitch.’
      • ‘It's a bit nerve-wracking, because you can really see the frill until after the neck edge is cast off.’
      • ‘If I were to do it again, I think that I would rework the button band so that I picked up and knitted 5 rows before casting off.’
      • ‘Or perhaps a hand-knitted sweater that looks like granny just cast it off her knitting needles for her favourite grandson?’
      • ‘It does feel good to cast off that last stitch and know that there's only a few ends to weave in.’
    • 2Set a boat or ship free from its moorings.

      ‘the boatmen cast off and rowed downriver’
      ‘Jack cast off our moorings’
      • ‘Ropes were cast off and stevedores moved in with bargepoles to keep the hull clear of the wharf.’
      • ‘He cranked the engine, cast off the bow and stern lines, and moved quickly out of the harbor.’
      • ‘No person shall launch or beach a boat or weigh anchor or cast off when the Department has by posting an order prohibiting the same.’
      • ‘On August 2, 2003 we cast off from the port of Narssaq, southern Greenland.’
      • ‘By the time that safety was reached Fitz had picked up the shivering victim, cast off the mooring lines and was motoring out of the marina.’
      • ‘Prehistoric seafarers casting off from their home islands to settle elsewhere would have been sure to take along breadfruit trees, which provide an abundance of fruit.’
      • ‘The ship gave a sudden lurch as the lines were cast off, and began sliding away from the dock in such a way that it seemed the dock itself was receding from them.’
      • ‘After trimming the boat, we cast off, Len taking his preferred spot up front, where he can enjoy the rhythm of paddling without the worry of steering.’
      • ‘Unfortunately they forgot to cast off the mooring line.’
      • ‘Joined by ABBM Peter Horne, POMT Chris Shred and CPL Bert Lancaster he cast off and headed to a spot six nautical miles north-north-west of Thursday Island.’
      • ‘As the last lines were cast off the ship edged away from the wharf.’
      1. 2.1(of a boat or ship) be set free from its moorings.
        ‘the ferry cast off and made a beeline for the pier’
        • ‘At the otherwise silent hotel, I am woken at 6.30 am by the screech of gulls as the mackerel boats cast off from the harbour and head out on the early-morning tide.’
        • ‘Some require riverboats to cast off from shore before gaming can begin.’
        • ‘It's anchors away as the Fleetwood to Knott End ferry service casts off for its yearly service across the Wyre estuary.’
        • ‘Jarrod and Nicola were just some of the hundreds of RAN men and women who shared some tearful minutes on the wharf before the warship cast off.’
        • ‘Then the MV Pharos cast off, sailing away from the pier for the last time, with the piper playing on deck.’
        • ‘The amphibious transport, with 260 sailors and soldiers on board, cast off from the Oil Wharf on May 12.’
        • ‘Just under an hour later Ironheart cast off from its moorings and slipped out into the current.’
        • ‘He had come to this conclusion about five minutes into his journey, just after the ship had cast off from the dock.’
        • ‘They aimed to beach her, but the inrush of water was too great and the tugs had to cast off as she sank to the sandy bottom at 10.30 pm.’
    • 3Let loose a hunting hound or hawk.

    • 4Printing
      Estimate the space that will be taken in print by manuscript copy.

      • ‘The master printer would decide whether the text would be set into type by a single compositor or by a number working simultaneously, in which case the copy would have to be cast off.’
  • cast someone off

    • Exclude someone from a relationship.

      • ‘Do not cast me off, do not forsake me, O God of my salvation!’
      • ‘Mr Peggotty sets out to find her, following her through many countries, and finally recovering her after she has been cast off by Steerforth.’
      • ‘His mother cast him off because he did not meet her expectations.’
      • ‘If he was so foolish as to cast you off, he doesn't deserve you anyway.’
      • ‘He is eventually ordered to leave her to follow his destiny of founding a new Troy, whereupon he casts her off with tragic consequences.’
      • ‘His lover makes him wear a long blonde wig, and cruelly casts him off when he's dressed as a man.’
      • ‘Holt lived, and knew pleasure, because his father had cast him off.’
      • ‘Do you plan to just cast me off when you're finished like all the others?’
      • ‘We haven't heard the last of him, and I can't see how Byers can cast him off now.’
      • ‘She used him to get what she wanted and then cast him off.’
  • cast on (or cast something on)

    • Make the first row of a specified number of loops on the needle.

      ‘cast on and knit a few rows of stockinette stitch’
      • ‘I'm doing the socks on 6 ply yarns so I only have to follow the pattern and cast on 64 stitches.’
      • ‘Cast on 52 stitches at end of next row to complete armhole shaping.’
      • ‘Using 2 needles, cast on 98(110:134:146:158:170) stitches.’
      • ‘Julie cast on in record time, and should be knitting fair isles in no time.’
  • cast something up

    • 1(of the sea) deposit something on the shore.

      • ‘One evening, sitting on an upturned boat cast up by the tide, I watched four old women shout derision at a carful of expensive-looking twenty-somethings.’
      • ‘December storms had beaten her to and fro and at last the sea had cast her up onto the shingle.’
      • ‘There is a sense that the coral looked better where it used to be, either living or cast up as a skeleton on a coral beach somewhere.’
      • ‘But gourd seeds would not germinate if cast up on a beach; human intervention would be required.’
    • 2Add up figures.

      • ‘I now began to cast up my accounts.’


Middle English: from Old Norse kasta to cast or throw.




Main definitions of cast in English

: cast1cast2



  • The actors taking part in a play, film, or other production.

    ‘he draws sensitive performances from his inexperienced cast’
    • ‘It has one hell of a great cast, wonderful writers and endless material to work with from the media and politics.’
    • ‘The supporting cast is also excellent; I didn't find a false note anywhere.’
    • ‘Based on the Robin Hood tale, this show features a cast of 15 young performers aged from 12-16 years.’
    • ‘The supporting cast each had moments to shine as well.’
    • ‘Please come and support the cast of over fifty who has worked hard over the past months to stage this very entertaining Pantomime.’
    • ‘The charismatic young cast handles the material well.’
    • ‘But, because of the efforts of the crew and every one of those actors in the cast, the film was completed.’
    • ‘You cannot ignore the star-studded cast, because that is the movie's selling point.’
    • ‘An all-male cast of actors is performing one of Shakespeare's favourite comedies in the middle of a Cotswold village at the weekend.’
    • ‘On the day we wrapped shooting the cast and crew threw a big party, but my mother had no intention of letting me go.’
    • ‘Many of the film's cast are not professional actors but people who live in the conditions portrayed.’
    • ‘The film doesn't take itself too seriously, but draws on raw emotion and features a talented ensemble cast.’
    • ‘It features a cast of 26 people and is one of the biggest festival productions undertaken in recent years.’
    • ‘Relatively unknown Canadian actors round out the cast, and you won't find fault with any one of them.’
    • ‘To be fair to the director and cast, the film achieves some of its stated goals.’
    • ‘It has some solid performances, a few laughs and a likable cast of characters.’
    • ‘As an international co-production, the film also heavily features American actors in the cast.’
    • ‘Most of the cast had their lines memorized, except for Dan, of course.’
    • ‘There were also notable spurts of strange behaviour and panic from cast and crew while filming.’
    • ‘In the grand tradition of the Ealing comedies, the film has attracted an all-star cast of character actors.’


  • 1 Assign a part in a play, film, or other production to (an actor)

    ‘he was cast as the Spanish dancer’
    figurative ‘a campaign for good nutrition, in which red meat is cast as the enemy’
    • ‘More than 20,000 background actors were cast for the films’
    • ‘An actor can be cast against type and pull out an astounding performance.’
    • ‘Another choice Bergman made was to cast non-professional actors in the leads.’
    • ‘They were cast as self-interested actors desperate for an escape from poverty, happy to embrace whatever the developed world could offer.’
    • ‘He was perfectly cast as the slick detective who played as cool as his perfectly tailored suits.’
    • ‘He will soon be cast as a supporting actor in a film.’
    • ‘Was it scary when you realised you were cast as an actress who was called the most beautiful woman in the world?’
    • ‘He will not play again this season, but it is easy to cast him as a fall guy in a violent business that ice hockey seems to encourage.’
    • ‘For the film, Barmak cast non-professional actors from orphanages and refugee camps.’
    • ‘He explains that it's neither easy nor cheap to cast talented actors for just a small number of scenes.’
    • ‘Each actor has been perfectly cast in an ideal role.’
    • ‘His complete deception regarding taxes and his grandstanding on the issue of unemployment cast him as little more than an opportunistic liar.’
    • ‘However, he is not a romantic lead and should never have been cast as such.’
    • ‘While it is no coincidence that she has twice been cast as a doctor, the actress seems far more hesitant in person, with long pauses punctuating her conversation.’
    • ‘Insiders know that when it comes to casting women in his projects, he insists on taking a very active - some might even say hands-on - role.’
    • ‘Actors are cast as versions of themselves and then left to the mercy of different teams of writers and directors.’
    • ‘Most of the major roles were cast with actors I already knew and with whom I had acted earlier in my career.’
    • ‘She was called back for a second, then a third audition before being cast as an understudy to the lead.’
    • ‘So surely the central issue for a film depicting such a charismatic character is casting an appropriate actor in the lead role.’
    • ‘Actors are cast as virtual crew members in prerecorded scenarios that astronauts then use when problems arise.’
    choose, select, pick, name, nominate, assign, appoint, assign the part to, give the part to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Allocate parts in (a play, film, or other production)
      ‘assembling a great baseball team is as tricky as casting a play’
      • ‘Chemistry is one of those things that just cannot be planned for when casting a film.’
      • ‘The garden is running its own show, and like a theatre production that you have cast, directed and produced, the summer is time to sit back and watch the performance.’
      • ‘The producer works with the writer, casts the film, and supervises the editing.’
      • ‘So there was no ego involved in plotting this film, casting this film, directing, editing - the only thing that mattered was the movie.’
      • ‘We cast the film at the Shamshatoo refugee camp in Peshawar, on Pakistan's north-western frontier, and at the various markets and schools in the area.’
      • ‘In casting the film, efforts were made to include the people who would be directly concerned in the event of a real-life outbreak or who at least worked in a related field.’
      • ‘Wednesday, April 28 everybody is pretend casting the movie based on Richard Clarke's book.’
      • ‘The characters have been well cast and the actors attack the roles with gusto.’
      • ‘Cars drive on to the beach and disappear towards the russet-coloured cliffs; a hardy soul casts a line.’
      • ‘The same casting directors were casting those films.’
      • ‘When Auerbach was casting the film, she was very aware that the actors had to be plausible together as mother and son.’
      • ‘Every part in this production was well cast, and each actor plays his or her role ably.’
      • ‘Trying to pick people who are not actors now but are going to be actors is a lot different from casting a play or a movie.’
      • ‘Directors take into account the public's perception of actors and actresses when casting for films.’
      • ‘The children were asked to cast a play using their classmates as the actors.’
      • ‘‘Once we cast the film, we spent a lot of time with the actors,’ he explains.’
      • ‘After he cast the film, we all met at his house for a preliminary discussion, after which he went to Sweden for five days and wrote the script.’
      • ‘A friend of mine who's casting teenage films in London just shot me in my living room, and we sent it off, and I got the gig.’
      • ‘Of course, perfect casting helped with every role cast with the right actor.’
      • ‘When you were casting the film, what qualities were you looking for in the lead character?’


Mid 17th century: a special use of cast.