Main definitions of cashier in English

: cashier1cashier2

cashier1

noun

  • A person handling payments and receipts in a store, bank, or other business.

    • ‘Next I called Drew, hoping he still had the receipt for the cashier's check.’
    • ‘Employees who are over-qualified for their jobs may also experience stress resulting from underload, graduates working as supermarket cashiers and warehouse attendants, for example.’
    • ‘Penny works as a supermarket cashier and spends most of her home life trying to deflect obscene verbal abuse from her son, Rory, a couch potato.’
    • ‘Bank cashiers have been known to key in the wrong amount by mistake.’
    • ‘The cashier took the check and handed her a receipt.’
    • ‘For much of the last fifty years the country's banks have operated as cashiers for often insolvent state enterprises, paying little attention to their ability to repay, and building up a mountain of bad debt.’
    • ‘Some of the other changes will include a cluster of round tables in the centre of the coffee shop and moving the cashier to the opposite end of the service area to improve customer flow.’
    • ‘Smartly dressed young ladies who work as cashiers at the banks that line the road dash across with handkerchiefs held tightly across their noses and mouths.’
    • ‘He called on the public not to corrupt city employees and only to pay accounts to designated cashiers.’
    • ‘‘It's very bad in the evenings, especially on Saturdays and Sundays,’ says the cashier at a sports shop.’
    • ‘The army of typists, filing clerks, cashiers, accountants, storekeepers, and drivers had a low level of education, were inefficient, reluctant to take initiative, and imbued with an ethos of red tape and routinism.’
    • ‘He has also pointed out the role played by women as bookkeepers and cashiers in small businesses, before they started to make an entry into the professional world of accounting.’
    • ‘Your finances are in tatters, your blood pressure is rising and the queue for the bank cashiers ' desks is never-ending.’
    • ‘There were nevertheless a group of fairly homogenous predominantly female jobs like cleaning, retail cashiers and sales assistants, which some men have entered in increasing numbers.’
    • ‘And come to think of it, I was recently harassed by a cashier in a shop.’
    • ‘They will be right across the board from cashiers to shop floor, managers to warehouse.’
    • ‘I can't help but think how much much money was being rung through the cashiers of big shops such as this.’
    • ‘Operating room nurses, surgeons, bank tellers, cashiers and other people who must spend hours on their feet find compression hosiery helpful in combating circulatory problems and leg fatigue.’
    • ‘The bank was expanding, and we needed two cashiers, so I became a cashier in the bank.’
    • ‘Stores gave cashiers black lists of banks whose cheques were not acceptable.’
    clerk, bank clerk, teller, bank teller, banker, treasurer, bursar, purser
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from Dutch cassier or French caissier, from caisse ‘cash’.

Pronunciation

cashier

/kæˈʃɪr//kaˈSHir/

Main definitions of cashier in English

: cashier1cashier2

cashier2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Dismiss (someone) from the armed forces in disgrace because of a serious misdemeanor.

    ‘he was found guilty and cashiered’
    ‘a cashiered National Guard major’
    • ‘He was cashiered over it.’
    • ‘Gen Whitelock was cashiered at the hospital in 1807 after his court martial for surrendering the fortress of Montevideo.’
    • ‘Someone says that that's a saving only if you cashier them out of the military.’
    • ‘In the Soviet Union, a series of ruthless political purges killed or cashiered the Red Army's most talented officers, stripping the military of the expertise it needed to cope with the complexities of modern warfare.’
    • ‘When one erring General committed the Amritsar massacre in India, there was great public outrage in Britain and he was cashiered over it.’
    • ‘Jerome managed to be captured by Chief Joseph's men in 1877 and the army all but cashiered him, but he lived long and well on his inheritance, likely meeting his grandnephew Winston Churchill before his 1935 death.’
    • ‘Following this experience, officers were often delayed from entering active duty until older officers retired, resigned, or were cashiered.’
    • ‘A further 150 generals have been cashiered and live under close surveillance.’
    • ‘The court acquitted six of the defendants, while the soldiers on trial were all cashiered.’
    • ‘Following his appointment as governor of Portland in 1650, he was sent to Scotland and in July 1651 he attracted further notoriety when he was cashiered for wrongfully detaining the pay of his men.’
    • ‘He was cashiered and would spend the next three years in prison.’
    • ‘The marshal would be cashiered and ‘promoted’ to a non-existent command in the west to silence his warnings of a potential shift of power in the direction of U.S. high-tech weaponry.’
    • ‘He was too vicious for even the Empire, and they cashiered him for some particularly violent ‘police action ‘a few years back.’’
    • ‘MacGregor had no right to the title ‘Sir’ and, far from being a hero of the Napoleonic wars, he had been cashiered out of the British army without ever seeing a shot fired in anger.’
    • ‘During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln hired, then cashiered, Generals Scott, McClellan, Burnside, Hooker and Meade before settling on Grant.’
    • ‘But he soon quarrelled with the Rump and defied its attempt to cashier him by leading a military coup in October.’
    • ‘Although cashiered military officers formed a Legitimate Command in September 1990, they could not create an effective fighting force in exile.’
    • ‘After a trial, Johnston was cashiered and the charges against Bligh rejected.’
    • ‘Ten years previously he had been cashiered out of the navy and had joined an SS group in Hamburg.’
    • ‘In the end, even the redoubtable grand defender of Tongzhou, Chen Kui, was cashiered for not controlling the highwaymen.’
    dismiss, discharge, expel, drum out, throw out, cast out, discard, get rid of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal Suspend or dismiss from an office or position.
      ‘the team owner had been cashiered for consorting with a gambler’
      • ‘It had left him an alcoholic, cashiered from the service after 17 years on a medical discharge.’
      • ‘The little guy did have a crucial part in the only goal of the half, but a number of the home defenders should have been cashiered for desertion for their part in it.’
      • ‘These efforts actually backfired, and one lower-level State Department official was cashiered.’
      • ‘By focusing in on this one event, readers asked, ‘Should this columnist, who we love, be cashiered for this one indiscretion?’’
      • ‘So, instead of advancing to the Fiesta Bowl to play for the national championship, the Wildcats were cashiered to the Alamo Bowl.’
      • ‘It has cashiered or attempted to discredit its own experts, ignored their advice, impeded scientific research into its health effects and assembled a disinformation campaign to confuse the issue.’

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘dismiss or disband troops’): from Flemish kasseren ‘disband (troops)’ or ‘revoke (a will)’, from French casser ‘revoke, dismiss’, from Latin quassare (see quash).

Pronunciation

cashier

/kæˈʃɪr//kaˈSHir/