Main definitions of cash in English

: cash1cash2

cash1

noun

  • 1Money in coins or notes, as distinct from checks, money orders, or credit.

    ‘the staff were paid in cash’
    ‘a discount for cash’
    • ‘When it comes to making major purchases, credit cards are far safer than cash or cheques.’
    • ‘Most of us are only familiar with a few ways to spend money: cash, checks and credit cards.’
    • ‘He took the victim's wallet containing cash and credit cards, and left the house.’
    • ‘Your best bet is to buy your bonds directly from a bank or credit union, using cash or money in an existing account.’
    • ‘If you need to be really strict with yourself, take cash (not cheques or credit cards) to shops so you can't spend more than you'd planned to.’
    • ‘The cheques were deposited in the account and the money later withdrawn with cash cheques.’
    • ‘The days when cash, a cheque or a promissory note were the only methods of payment have passed.’
    • ‘The bag contained £10 in cash as well as credit cards, a cheque book, sunglasses, documents and a small leather purse.’
    • ‘These accounts don't offer checking services, which means that bill paying must be done with cash or money orders.’
    • ‘Most credit cards and travellers' cheques are widely accepted, as are cash notes of the world's major trading currencies.’
    • ‘Wallets containing cash, credit cards and documents have also been taken from lockers and police report cases have increased in the last two months’
    • ‘Payment by the bidders will have to be in cash or bank guaranteed cheques.’
    • ‘The $200 deposit can be made using travellers cheques, credit card or cash.’
    • ‘In the finance office, the main coffer lock was detonated, damaging all papers, including vouchers, promissory notes, cash and cheque box.’
    • ‘You can take Traveller cheques, cash, and a credit card.’
    • ‘Entities having cash credit accounts or bill accounts can now make repayments of their credit facilities in cash instead of a cheque or draft.’
    • ‘Giving me my money as cash or a cheque, so that I can go and exchange that money for goods and services.’
    • ‘The men made off towards Sheen Road with the bag containing cash and cheques, a mobile phone and credit cards.’
    • ‘The police also recovered Rs 30,000 cash and 29 coins from the box.’
    • ‘The account is then settled with cash, travellers cheques or a credit card at the end of the week.’
    money, ready cash, ready money, currency, legal tender, hard cash
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Money in any form, especially that which is immediately available.
      ‘she was always short of cash’
      • ‘Little is made of the fact that household cash and savings deposits rose 8.3 per cent year-on-year in September.’
      • ‘For those short on cash, down payments are not required for the program.’
      • ‘The trade association said most shoppers had been left short of cash to purchase domestic goods because of escalating house prices.’
      • ‘The Ellenor Foundation can turn old mobile phones, used postage stamps, empty toner and ink cartridges and foreign coins and notes into cash.’
      • ‘Aid was being hampered only by the civil war and the difficulty of getting resources to the area, not by lack of cash.’
      • ‘A lack of venture capital cash has forced the company to look abroad for partners to develop its lead product, a treatment for cystic fibrosis.’
      • ‘Over the past three years, insurers have seriously depleted their reserves of cash, which they will need to build back up again.’
      • ‘A county council spokesman said the fund was not short of cash for paying pensioners.’
      • ‘The lack of cash to fund the relatively new treatment has prompted Gavin's mother, Margaret, to write to politicians and the hospital for an explanation.’
      • ‘But it has been criticised for handing out large amounts of taxpayers' cash to wealthy private individuals.’
      • ‘At the same time, the push is on for private contributions of cash.’
      • ‘The Group remains in a negative cashflow position as it used its available cash to finance capital expenditure and retire debt.’
      • ‘Musicals are notoriously expensive, and a lack of cash tends to compromise their look and our enjoyment.’
      • ‘The fund was set up this year to address a perceived lack of venture capital cash for firms looking for investments of between £2m-5m.’
      • ‘The former Sunday school building in Stanley Street, which is owned by Pendle Council, was threatened with closure last year due to a lack of cash to fund repairs.’
      • ‘Despite living in an affluent suburb, nine mouths to feed meant the family was always scratching around for cash.’
      • ‘Nine months later, they are nearing profitability and have substantial cash reserves to fund growth.’
      • ‘Health bosses said the shortage has been heightened by practices going private, claiming demand and lack of cash was affecting their ability to treat patients.’
      • ‘Money is divided into cash for the most deprived areas, the second most deprived and projects to benefit all.’
      • ‘They say that patience pays - which probably explains why I'm always short of cash.’
      finance, resources, funds, money, means, assets, wherewithal, capital, investment capital
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Give or obtain notes or coins for (a check or money order)

    • ‘Cook had just been in and was en route to the bank to cash a cheque.’
    • ‘If we are going to be cashing cheques for the bank, we could not face the cut in payment.’
    • ‘The clerk says it could be two weeks before I hear whether someone has cashed the money order.’
    • ‘His whole game is built around high intensity and energy, and McManus deposits work in the bank to allow his body to cash cheques on the field.’
    • ‘Once on holiday, it is likely that a second commission charge will be levied when cashing the cheques.’
    • ‘Recently there has been a spate of robberies against senior citizens who go to the bank to cash their pension cheques.’
    • ‘As an airline co-pilot he could readily cash a wage cheque and date the best bank tellers at the same time.’
    • ‘Then there are people who live in far away places where there are no facilities such as banks and the cost of travelling to cash their cheques is far beyond what they receive.’
    • ‘But as soon as he had finished laughing all the way to the bank and cashed the cheque, he was arrested on 24 counts of arson.’
    • ‘We would ask people to be especially careful when cashing cheques, particularly third party ones or from people they do not know.’
    • ‘‘I had problems cashing my traveller's cheques, the banks were closed and, for four days, I had no currency,’ said Alex.’
    • ‘What's more, some foreign banks charge fees of up to 6% for cashing travellers' cheques, so check before you hand over your cheques to the cashier!’
    • ‘Hamilton says it was unintentional and points out that the cheques were cashed at different times, but he did receive double his expense back.’
    • ‘He had cashed the money orders and spent them, and he wasn't even in the house like he was supposed to be.’
    • ‘Turnovers decreased, customers requested banking services such as cashing cheques, and there were difficulties with keeping appropriate levels and denominations of change.’
    • ‘It is, further, the practice of many banks to cash cheques presented by a customer to a branch other than that with which he maintains his account.’
    • ‘She agreed to buy a pair of scissors for £9, but when the cheque was cashed at a bank it had been altered to £99.’
    • ‘He turned out not only not to have any bulbs - his intention apparently was to steal them to order - but he failed to do even that before cashing the cheques.’
    • ‘Under the new regulations, all payees must present some form of photographic ID in order to cash URP cheques.’
    • ‘After a phone call, they informed me that if I went into Kitchener, the post office there would have the money to cash the money order.’
    exchange, change, convert into cash, convert into money, turn into cash, turn into money, encash, realize, liquidate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Bridge Lead (a high card) so as to take the opportunity to win a trick.
      • ‘Usually, therefore, defense starts with one defender cashing a long suit, hoping that his partner will become void in the suit and be able to discard in another suit, or simply to pave the way for an attack in that same suit.’
      • ‘Ann now cashes five clubs on which Bill discards down to the two aces and the 9’

Phrases

  • cash in one's chips

    • informal Die.

      • ‘Roddy was in our monthly poker group that included a rowdy, hard-living group, nearly all of whom have cashed in their chips and are still great memories.’
      • ‘The legendary Veronica Dunne sings the role of the Countess, who also cashes in her chips, but not until she has hit a few high notes.’
      • ‘‘On the 11 th,’ he says, ‘I came close to cashing in my chips.’’

Phrasal Verbs

  • cash in

    • Take advantage of or exploit (a situation)

      ‘the breweries were cashing in on the rediscovered taste for real ales’
      • ‘No wonder the teeny cosmetics market is cashing in, targeting their lip-gloss and nail polish at increasingly younger kids.’
      • ‘Children constitute a large and attractive market segment and the broadcasting industry is cashing in on that.’
      • ‘The university, students and local community council have all accused the hotel owners of cashing in on the royal connection.’
      • ‘The hysteria around the idea that we are swamped with illegal refugees cashing in on our natural benevolence is mounting daily.’
      • ‘Or do you, like me, feel exploited by big institutions cashing in on the phenomenon?’
      • ‘To a certain extent, he's cashing in on the latest literary fad.’
      • ‘The oil companies stress they cannot cash in this profit because they have to replenish stocks.’
      • ‘These problems haven't stopped the contractors fighting over the Railtrack maintenance budget from cashing in.’
      • ‘The Delhi Metro is also hopeful of cashing in on its growing popularity.’
      • ‘It made him smile and he smiled all the way to the bank, cashing in on his fake war experiences to get himself a name.’
      • ‘Supermarkets have been accused of cashing in on the organic food boom by misleading consumers over Scottish salmon.’
      • ‘The shop branched out to include sports clothing as well as trainers and soon he was cashing in on an unlikely new rage for casual sportswear.’
      • ‘Pirates have been cashing in on the time lag in the film's release by showing illegal copies of the movies in small towns.’
      • ‘He doesn't make any apologies, however, about cashing in on the pink dollar.’
      • ‘At present I really do think this hybrid idea is just a case of Toyota and Lexus cashing in on the lunacy of the environmental movement.’
      • ‘It is true - not only are the hotels cashing in, but the local rental market is booming.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, it was the studio that was cashing in on the popularity.’
      • ‘Fraudsters and scam artists are cashing in on the generosity of the public according to Trading Standard officials.’
      • ‘Even the city's Resistance Museum is cashing in on the orgy of national pride with its exhibit on Rembrandt in second world war propaganda.’
      • ‘Their offspring may have to become clerks in the shopping markets instead of cashing in on the reputation of their parents.’
      take advantage of, turn to one's advantage, exploit
      View synonyms
  • cash something in

    • Convert an insurance policy, savings account, or other investment into money.

      • ‘Never invest in share or share-based investment plans unless they give you the flexibility to cash them in at a time of your choosing - that is, when the market is doing well.’
      • ‘Because of fluctuating stock prices, customers require up-to-date valuations on their investments to decide if they should cash them in.’
      • ‘Do we cash them in for money at the end of our time?’
      • ‘The change in tax treatment of life assurance investment products from the beginning of this year means funds are allowed to grow tax-free until the investor cashes them in.’
      • ‘I would like to know if you think it makes sense to cash it in and use the proceeds to buy an investment property towards my retirement instead?’
      • ‘Just this past week a person who is two months away from becoming a pensioner told me he wished he had, every time he changed his job, invested his pension money rather than cashing it in.’
      • ‘It may be cold comfort for Irish policyholders who will lose up to 15 per cent of the value of their investments if they cash them in, but British policyholders are worse off.’
      • ‘Is it worth keeping this going or should I cash it in and invest elsewhere?’
      • ‘Either way, you're likely to get a much better return on your money and you also have the flexibility to cash it in when the time is right.’
      • ‘A puzzler for the impaired - what sort of ‘asset’ requires that you borrow more money to cash it in?’
      • ‘You will probably find that, as well as cashing them in on their 10th birthday, you can either continue your contributions or cease paying in, but leave in the money invested so far.’
      • ‘If an investor wants to cash their policy in, then the insurer has to make an adjustment to the policy value in order to be fair to the investors who are left behind.’
      • ‘Young investors have more opportunities for riskier financial plans as they are not dependent on it for an income and can wait to cash it in when their investments are at a high.’
      • ‘But the outcome would normally be that the policy would be cashed in before the superannuation fund moneys were paid over.’
      • ‘The minimum purchase is four units, which costs €25, and prize bonds can be cashed in at any time.’
      • ‘Investment earnings would be taxed once they are cashed in and you have used them to buy something.’
      • ‘It can only assume the holdings were cashed in, or transferred to someone else.’
      • ‘When the policy is cashed in, the firm recoups only the amount it paid in premiums.’
      • ‘The decision with-profits investors have to make is whether to keep their investments or to cash them in.’
      • ‘The retailer can then either choose to keep circulating the money by spending it at another store, or cash it in at a 90 per cent exchange, with the remaining 10 per cent donated to charity.’
  • cash out

    • 1Cost.

      ‘juicy baked chicken cashed out at $7’
    • 2Convert an insurance policy, savings account, or other investment into money.

      ‘most of them cashed out when their stock options reached a certain optimum level’

Origin

Late 16th century (denoting a box for money): from Old French casse or Italian cassa ‘box’, from Latin capsa (see case).

Pronunciation

cash

/kæʃ//kaSH/

Main definitions of cash in English

: cash1cash2

cash2

noun

historical
  • A coin of low value from China, southern India, or Southeast Asia.

Origin

Late 16th century: from Portuguese caixa, from Tamil kāsu, influenced by cash.

Pronunciation

cash

/kæʃ//kaSH/