Definition of casement in English:

casement

noun

  • 1A window or part of a window set on a hinge so that it opens like a door.

    [as modifier] ‘casement windows’
    • ‘The new room measures only 12x13 feet but feels far more spacious thanks to a large casement window and sliding glass doors that open onto a new deck.’
    • ‘Dutton searched out contemporary-styled windows and doors that had the feel of the home's original materials - wide-mullioned casements and simple hardware.’
    • ‘The best windows are awning and casement styles because these often close tighter than sliding types.’
    • ‘The house is far from sumptuous, but comfortable - spotless linoleum floors, casement windows framed by floral curtains, utilitarian furniture.’
    • ‘Through arched doors and lead-framed casements appear bridged lanes and castellated walls.’
    • ‘From the casement window of the bedroom I looked out over a profoundly rural scene.’
    • ‘Light how pours in through a triple bank of windows and two casement windows beside the fireplace.’
    • ‘The large casement windows in his bedroom and the porch off his sitting room offered magnificent views of his treasured landscape.’
    • ‘Presently the casement creaked and swung open and his father called out.’
    • ‘The thieves broke in by forcing a casement window in the dining room before ransacking the house.’
    • ‘Leaded casement windows opened on to the tiny plaza in front of the cathedral and a breeze billowed tapestry-like curtains in the bedroom and sitting rooms.’
    • ‘She strode to the casement window, unlatched it and dropped her gaze to the chalky clearing ringed by juvenile rhododendrons and magnolia trees.’
    • ‘The timber casement windows are new, but much of the interior wood is original including the window shutters and some panelled doors.’
    • ‘The room seems trashed beyond repair, while light spills through the casement windows beyond which green things are growing.’
    • ‘In the rest of Europe, wooden casement windows that open out like a door are the norm.’
    • ‘A casement window works like a door, with hinges on one side and the lock and handle on the other.’
    • ‘An open casement window provides the painted studio's interior light.’
    • ‘Hinges on newer casement windows are generally pivot-arm hinges.’
    • ‘Sunlight was pouring through the large casement windows and Ted's room was warm.’
    • ‘Each morning the inside casement windows are covered with heavy moisture.’
    1. 1.1literary A window.
      • ‘The stained-glass insert in the astronomer's casement is the one minor detail that differentiates the two hourglass windows.’
      • ‘She never really noticed much even though that large casement exposed the contents of the store like the box of a toy with the cellophane window.’
    2. 1.2 The sash of a sash window.
      • ‘Instead, he preferred casement sashes, which he placed in strips, one after the other.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as an architectural term denoting a hollow molding): from Anglo-Latin cassimentum, from cassa, from Latin capsa (see case).

Pronunciation:

casement

/ˈkāsmənt/