Definition of carouse in English:

carouse

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Drink plentiful amounts of alcohol and enjoy oneself with others in a noisy, lively way.

    ‘they danced and caroused until the drink ran out’
    ‘a night of carousing’
    • ‘He would come home early, early in the morning - after work, he would go out drinking and carousing, so his adventures would take until after midnight to culminate.’
    • ‘There's evidence to support this, too: where I used to go out carousing until the wee small hours during the week, I'm now more likely to be moderate and in bed by midnight - even on the weekends.’
    • ‘It is the morning after the night before and he is looking relatively chipper despite a late night carousing in Glasgow.’
    • ‘The Middleton Guardian was told that up to 60 vandals regularly invade the grounds and spend the whole night drinking and carousing, leaving a trail of dangerous debris in their wake.’
    • ‘He looked weary and about three years older - like he had just spent an entire night carousing through Detroit and drinking to his heart's content.’
    • ‘He is a respectable businessman now but when we were young we terrorised Glasgow's nightclubs, drinking, carousing and doing a lot else I can't mention.’
    • ‘As well as turning back the clock on the field, the end of the 90 minutes simply signalled the beginning of a great night's carousing and reminiscing at the players' post-match party.’
    • ‘I was raised a strict Mormon; alcohol, smoking, going to bars, carousing, etc. were against the rules of the religion.’
    • ‘We drank, caroused, sang, read, shared and worked together, only to part forever from each other's company.’
    • ‘He died a young man and it was possible that his lifestyle sleeping in wet clothes, drinking and carousing led to his death.’
    • ‘Everyone's out carousing in the street anyway.’
    • ‘All the other guys on the basketball team were already carousing, dancing with girls and eating to their heart's content.’
    • ‘It's a day of drinking, carousing and live music.’
    • ‘She felt closer to her father and her own pirate blood that night, carousing in the pirate town of Tortuga.’
    • ‘There was the opportunity to continue drinking and carousing, but I'd had enough.’
    • ‘Are all the symbols of a modern Christmas, with its glitz, glamour, over eating, drinking, carousing in keeping with the simple story of the Nativity?’
    • ‘They go out dining, drinking, and carousing together.’
    • ‘A fine night's carousing at the college ball was followed by a boisterous afternoon on the river at the annual regatta.’
    • ‘Instead of returning home, he made a night of it, carousing with his friends.’
    • ‘She was stuck indoors with the kids while he was out carousing.’
    drink and make merry, go on a drinking bout, go on a binge, binge, binge-drink, overindulge, drink freely, drink heavily, go on a pub crawl, go on a spree
    have a party, revel, celebrate, feast, enjoy oneself, have a good time, roister, eat, drink, and be merry, frolic, romp
    booze, go boozing, go on a bender, paint the town red, bend one's elbow, party, rave, have a ball, raise hell, make whoopee, live it up, whoop it up, have a fling
    go on the bevvy
    wassail
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noun

  • A noisy, lively drinking party.

    ‘corporate carouses’
    • ‘The Last Supper, or a mere carouse as Ivan had called it (which caused his confinement in the dark shed), came to the apogee.’
    social gathering, gathering, social occasion, social event, social function, function, get-together, celebration, reunion, festivity, jamboree, reception, at-home, soirée, social
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Origin

Mid 16th century: originally as an adverb meaning all out, completely in the phrase drink carouse, from German gar aus trinken; hence drink heavily, have a drinking bout.

Pronunciation:

carouse

/kəˈrouz/