Main definitions of care in US English:

: care1CARE2

care1

noun

  • 1The provision of what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance, and protection of someone or something.

    ‘the care of the elderly’
    ‘the child is safe in the care of her grandparents’
    ‘health care’
    • ‘This device could be a big step forward for emergency care and public health.’
    • ‘Local health campaigners say coronary care at Downpatrick's Downe Hospital is set to be compromised.’
    • ‘They are abandoning care and maintenance of the wharves to fishermen.’
    • ‘To keep them growing and blooming well into the fall they need some basic care and maintenance.’
    • ‘Reducing cost of venous disease management and improving quality of care are necessary.’
    • ‘It is feared that the longer the pit is without care and maintenance, the higher the cost of getting it back on line, making it harder to find a buyer.’
    • ‘After providing people with necessary medical care, the troops gave away the food and drinks.’
    • ‘The private sector had always had a small and important support role but past efforts to improve care through private provision had failed.’
    • ‘Society owes a debt of gratitude to people involved in voluntary groups who deliver animal care and welfare services.’
    • ‘The strategy says there are too many hospitals and too many consultants involved in the provision of cancer care.’
    • ‘This is the essence of patient centred care, and most health professionals strive to achieve it.’
    • ‘The amendment deleted provisions for aged care and retirement village developments.’
    • ‘Easy access to research on improving safety may help doctors and other health professionals make care safer.’
    • ‘The converse of this is that many of the benefits to health from improved care today will not be seen for many years.’
    • ‘It has provided NHS dental care since the health service's beginnings in 1948.’
    • ‘These nurses work with local family doctors and public health nurses bringing vital care and support.’
    • ‘The court was told that the division between health care and personal care can be difficult if not impossible to draw.’
    • ‘There is no national plan for providing health and social care where it is needed.’
    • ‘Know your body and mitigate health problems through preventive care.’
    • ‘Delegates also called for improved services for pensioners in health, social care and transport.’
    safe keeping, supervision, custody, charge, protection, keeping, keep, control, management, ministration, guidance, superintendence, tutelage, aegis, responsibility
    concern, consideration, attention, attentiveness, thought, regard, mind, notice, heed, solicitude, interest, caringness, sympathy, respect
    View synonyms
  • 2Serious attention or consideration applied to doing something correctly or to avoid damage or risk.

    ‘he planned his departure with great care’
    • ‘Many were the hours and days she put in faithfully attending to her work with great care and attention to detail.’
    • ‘Roll-up smoking seems to be an activity rather than an addiction - each lovingly rolled with care and attention.’
    • ‘A summons of driving without due care and consideration was taken into account.’
    • ‘He was convicted of driving without due care and attention in September 2002 and fined £400.’
    • ‘This can take some care and serious thought, depending on the exact questions you are asked.’
    • ‘Standard paper requires patience and extra care when hanging so it does not get damaged.’
    • ‘But officers can use their discretion to deal with drivers who they consider are not driving with full care and attention.’
    • ‘Every task was undertaken with great care and attention to detail.’
    • ‘I have to wonder whether my critics have truly read it with due care and attention.’
    • ‘But no one would claim that a whale's bones need the same care and attention as a collection of Viking silver or a set of ivory chess pieces.’
    • ‘Wash your garment with care and avoid scrubbing excessively to prevent damaging it.’
    • ‘Accidents happen because of somebody's lack of care and attention.’
    • ‘It is better to be safe than sorry and due care and responsibility can avoid a lot of sorrow and anguish if rules and guidelines are adhered to.’
    • ‘I tried to answer every question with much care, considering the risk to my life.’
    • ‘I honestly believe the vast majority of people make major life decisions with a lot of care and consideration.’
    • ‘Quite the opposite, it's a funny and exhilarating movie, which has evidently been made with much care and attention.’
    • ‘There are now official Government warnings to avoid or take extreme care in 121 countries.’
    • ‘Considerable care is required when handling diseased animals or carcasses.’
    • ‘A little extra care and attention to the problem will make the difference.’
    • ‘The forceps get in to the tight mouth of the dab much easier and do no damage if used correctly and with care.’
    caution, carefulness, wariness, awareness, heedfulness, heed, attention, attentiveness, alertness, watchfulness, vigilance, circumspection, prudence, guardedness, observance
    discretion, judiciousness, forethought, thought, regard, heed, mindfulness
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 An object of concern or attention.
      ‘the cares of family life’
      • ‘Indeed we have left the cares and concerns of the world behind.’
      • ‘Our own cares and concerns suddenly melt when one sees what others are sometimes having to endure.’
      • ‘I have a few stupid movies to watch, and my plan is to put her down and unplug from all cares and concerns.’
      • ‘Actually, there is nothing to suggest that Sourav is finding the cares of captaincy a strain and a drain on his role as a player.’
      • ‘The pair escape to his rooftop garret and, free from the cares of the world, begin a passionate love affair.’
      • ‘Compassion begins from where we are, from the circle of our cares and concerns.’
      • ‘Our God wants us to communicate our cares and our concerns through the power of prayer.’
      • ‘From this world we must depart to seek the world of air, the world of daily cares, great and trivial concerns.’
      • ‘Yet he understands that the Parkhead side will arrive with their own baggage, their own cares and concerns.’
      • ‘Insults and cares of concern did not penetrate these walls, and I remained almost cynical.’
      • ‘Michelangelo never married, but he was burdened with a family and all its cares.’
      • ‘It transports the spirit and subjugates the cares of the day.’
      • ‘Up to the 1990s, smoking was generally regarded as a bad habit, if one that provided some respite from the cares of work and family life.’
    2. 2.2 A feeling of or occasion for anxiety.
      ‘she was driving along without a care in the world’
      • ‘These were people who had the same joys, cares and worries as my own family and wanted the best for their children.’
      • ‘There were plenty of families there all having fun without a care in the world.’
      • ‘The beautiful, isolated surroundings of the moors also play a vital part in helping guests leave behind the cares and worries of everyday life, Jan admits.’
      • ‘One woman with emphysema entered the home to spare her children the care and the anxiety of her illness.’
      • ‘In the few oh so brief minutes it takes to smoke a cigarette all cares and troubles seem irrelevant.’
      • ‘Having troubles and cares adds so much weight to your mind, which then becomes harder to carry around in your head.’
      • ‘Then I went to Dream Goddess and let my cares and worries float away.’
      • ‘The best thing is that everyone who goes to Bats Day can just leave all their cares and worries at the gate, and just have a fun time.’
      • ‘Then she saw his whole face, lined with the cares and worries that come from trying to balance work and family.’
      • ‘To those worn by cares and anxieties it is a resort for temporary respite.’
      • ‘But she's also got a knack for handling your cares and worries and, when it's all too much, your tears.’
      • ‘Drunkards think they have no problems, they don't worry about tomorrow, and they have no burden or cares.’
      • ‘But now they have moved into a different period: one filled with the cares and responsibilities of middle age.’
      • ‘She was on stage, doing what she loved and she had no cares in the world, she was just concerned with everyone staying on beat.’
      • ‘Seeking an oasis from daily cares and worries, they come here for camaraderie, a common cause and simply to find a treasure for a bargain.’
      • ‘It felt good to be back in a friendly atmosphere without a care in the world.’
      • ‘Everyone could enjoy the fresh air and warm sun as they strolled along without a care in the world.’
      • ‘These are the best days of training - with good friends and without a care in the world.’
      • ‘You need to escape from the cares and worries of everyday life.’
      • ‘Worldly worries and cares take on a different perspective as the devotee looks on everything with a spiritual outlook.’
      worry, anxiety, trouble, disquiet, disquietude, bother, unease, upset, distress, concern
      View synonyms

verb

[no object]
  • 1often with negative Feel concern or interest; attach importance to something.

    ‘they don't care about human life’
    with clause ‘I don't care what she says’
    • ‘There's almost nothing about this story I understand and even less that I care about.’
    • ‘To be an authentic fan is to care about the art regardless of money and certainly not to make money off the artist.’
    • ‘But Tara didn't care about winning; a ribbon wasn't all that important to her.’
    • ‘They may be caricatures, but they are interesting ones whose lives we care about, leaving us wondering what will happen next.’
    • ‘There was a happy ending, though, as Canadians don't really care about the US anthem anyway.’
    • ‘I've already told me you really don't care what they say or it doesn't affect you in any way.’
    • ‘For several years I have considered it a mistake to care about sports with the passion I do.’
    • ‘When I set out to write this article I wanted to respond to an issue that I care about and feel is important.’
    • ‘We don't really care about diversity all that much in America, even though we talk about it a great deal.’
    • ‘Either way, it would be in their best interest to care about you, the student, and respond.’
    • ‘Of course maybe that was why he was doing this, he does seem like the rebel type who doesn't care what his friend has to say.’
    • ‘The only one who doesn't care about the tune is Barry, who has an important interview.’
    • ‘He couldn't let his thoughts drift off into something he shouldn't care about.’
    • ‘It's not a great plot - a little cheesy, but enough for us to care about and stay interested in the film.’
    • ‘This book is important reading for all senior officers and NCOs who care about their Army.’
    • ‘The policeman who seems to care about Paul and Mel's situation is only interested in his promotion.’
    • ‘It piqued my interest enough to care about where this story, and these characters, are going.’
    • ‘I finally understood the people who don't care about anything other than themselves.’
    • ‘As an artist, my normal impulse is to write things that people don't care about and, ideally, can't even understand.’
    • ‘Call it a hunch though, but I think she would be too interested in her surroundings to care about me.’
    be concerned, worry, worry oneself, trouble oneself, bother, mind
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Feel affection or liking.
      ‘you care very deeply for him’
      • ‘I realised then I had to change because it was really affecting the people around me who I cared about.’
      • ‘I know I am real because when you hold me I feel comforted, when you say you care I feel loved.’
      • ‘Well, I don't really care; all my friends never cared about me anyway.’
      • ‘All the members of a laughter club meet each other with open minds and they care for each other.’
      • ‘All you need to do is imagine the mom you loved and cared about died, how would you feel?’
      • ‘As much as he did really care for her, at least he knew by now that she cared a tiny bit for him too.’
      • ‘It was nice to know her friends cared but there was that fine line that went to far.’
      • ‘He has a weakness and that would be his heart, or in other words, the ones he cares about and loves.’
      • ‘Though she doesn't care for her spot as to the Gaya throne, she cares deeply for her people.’
      • ‘You need people - people around you to care for you and to show you that they care.’
      • ‘And regardless of what happened with Jude, I know he cares about you and I can see that you care for him.’
      • ‘Tears filled her eyes as she looked around at her friends who cared enough to do this.’
      • ‘The other Ryan, whom I'm still friends with, is asking me out on dates and telling all my friends how much he cares about me.’
      • ‘He who cares even for the sparrows will certainly care for us.’
      • ‘Not only do we have a good time hanging out, I also love the way he cares about everyone.’
      • ‘You are my friend, and I care a lot about you, even if I haven't really shown it lately.’
      • ‘Think of this not as a derogatory term but as a term of love and affection because we care.’
      • ‘If we do it now we'll still be friends who care a lot about each other, but also have the ability to go out with other people.’
      • ‘In such a world, the man oppressing the woman has no bad conscience, and suffers no loss of respect from those he cares about - mainly other men.’
      • ‘She does not view them as subordinates in any way, she views them as friends and she cares about them!’
      love, be fond of, feel affection for, cherish, hold dear, treasure, prize, adore, dote on, think the world of, worship, idolize, be devoted to
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2care for something/care to do something Like or be willing to do or have something.
      ‘would you care for some tea?’
      ‘I don't care to listen to him’
      • ‘The governing party is always quick to claim a mandate (whatever that may mean) for whatever measures it cares to promote.’
      • ‘Nobody cares to redress the genuine grievances of aggrieved officials.’
      • ‘They do a wonderful job and make everyone who cares to call feel welcome.’
      • ‘These sections have been defending rights of minorities in abstract secular terms, without caring to examine whether the purpose of secularism i.e. equality of treatment by the State is being achieved.’
      • ‘And for anyone who cares to listen, BBC world have a Kazakh language service available.’
      • ‘I laud The Times as a place - sometimes the only newspaper in my experience - that cares to print the truth.’
      • ‘But, despite knowing much about her, or really caring to know anything about her, from time to time, Kate pops up on my girl-crush list.’
      • ‘At any rate, the civil war has continued if only one cares to look.’
      • ‘I see it as an art form that can address any audience that it cares to address.’
      • ‘I'm going to post the lyrics here for anyone who cares to read them.’
      • ‘If a spell-checker cares to pick it up fine, if not then I certainly can't be bothered to check it manually.’
      • ‘He had a keen interest in golf and indeed passed his vast knowledge of the game to anyone caring to listen.’
      • ‘The plain, scientific research on this exists for anyone who cares to look it up.’
      • ‘This charter, still valid if the council cares to exercise it, was of immeasurable value to local trade for centuries.’
      • ‘If anyone cares to remember, they lost the last election, but they decided to work the refs.’
      • ‘Millar didn't care much for sentiment, but he remembered Bilsland with some fondness.’
      • ‘It would show readers the blog cares to be as exquisite as possible, visually.’
      • ‘Again, not particularly caring to answer to the trite political content per se, but looking at this as a song lyric, it is unfocused and scattered.’
      • ‘She was more of a pragmatist than she cares to admit.’
      • ‘After all, the day itself is only as evil as one cares to make it.’
      like, wish for, want, desire, prefer, fancy, have a fancy for, take a fancy to, feel like
      View synonyms
  • 2care forLook after and provide for the needs of.

    ‘he has numerous animals to care for’
    • ‘The animal is currently being cared for by a horse lover at a secret location somewhere in Greater Manchester.’
    • ‘PfA, short for People For Animals, cares for and rehabilitates injured animals.’
    • ‘The younger children are usually cared for by foster parents, said a spokesperson.’
    • ‘Need I even add that helping and caring for animals is integral to caring for our fellow man?’
    • ‘It will provide volunteers for anyone caring for a child under five who is finding the going tough.’
    • ‘In his final days he was cared for by doctors and nurses who went beyond the call.’
    • ‘KSPCA cares for all animals and attends accidents involving animals.’
    • ‘A mother is so grateful to the nurse who cares for her daughter that she has nominated her to receive a prestigious award.’
    • ‘He is a self-taught doctor who cares for all the wounded animals that he encounters.’
    • ‘Abandoned animals are cared for by a number of organisations in Swindon.’
    • ‘A drop-in centre will provide respite for youngsters caring for a sick parent or sibling.’
    • ‘The practice cares for small animals, cattle and horses.’
    • ‘My dream is to become a nurse so I can care for those who are so often are forgotten.’
    • ‘Nurses who care for the elderly in York are to explain their role at a special meeting next month in the city.’
    • ‘The others helped to rescue and care for their two guards and several other people injured in the crash.’
    • ‘But the report seems to overlook the security that being cared for by a grandparent provides.’
    • ‘The circus is no different - those animals need to be cared for and protected.’
    • ‘A qualified veterinarian sterilises, treats and, in every way, cares for the animals.’
    • ‘The father-of-two also wants to contact the woman who found him, and any other nurses who cared for him.’
    • ‘The local branch is currently caring for 14 animals at one of its busiest times ever.’
    look after, take care of, tend, attend to, mind, minister to, take charge of, nurse, provide for, foster, protect, watch, guard
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • care of

    • At the address of.

      ‘write to me care of Anne’
      • ‘If you are having similar problems do write to me care of Scotland on Sunday.’
      • ‘Eager suitors are invited to write Rowland care of her maximum security penitentiary.’
  • I (or he, she, etc.) couldn't care less

    • informal Used to express complete indifference.

      ‘he couldn't care less about football’
      • ‘Sadly, it didn't matter, since my friends and mother couldn't care less which one it was.’
      • ‘Today, she couldn't care less about the trappings of success.’
      • ‘Those on the right want more drilling and couldn't care less about conservation.’
      • ‘But on any given game night if we don't get a guy his tickets quickly and efficiently, he couldn't care less about that issue.’
      • ‘Look, I couldn't care less if the guy stealing my newspaper is morally conflicted.’
      • ‘By saying nothing to you about your achievements, it can seem to you as if they couldn't care less.’
      • ‘She couldn't care less about Richie any more than we could.’
      • ‘The other boy wanted nothing more than the object in her hand, and couldn't care less what happened to her.’
      • ‘But it was the manner in which he asked that made me realize he couldn't care less.’
      • ‘It was good to be in a crowd of people who couldn't care less about blogging for part of the weekend.’
      inattentive, incautious, negligent, remiss
      unstudied, artless, casual, effortless, unconcerned, nonchalant, insouciant, languid, leisurely, informal
      View synonyms
  • I (or he, she, etc,) could care less

    • informal Used to express complete indifference.

      ‘I could care less about award shows’
  • for all you care (or he, she, etc. cares)

    • informal Used to indicate that someone feels no interest or concern.

      ‘I could drown for all you care’
      • ‘The problem is he can't say out loud that for all he cares California can slide into the ocean and become excellent reef material or he might tend to discourage Republicans to vote for local candidates.’
      • ‘They could be wearing grass skirts for all you care.’
      • ‘It could all be done with elastic bands for all you care.’
      • ‘Then wear it with rubber shoes, for all he cares!’
      • ‘Ralph told me that I can punch the punching bag until I drop for all he cares - he really wants me to get this out of my system.’
  • have a care

    • dated often in imperativeBe cautious.

      ‘“Have a care!” she warned’
      • ‘‘I would advise you, dear sir, to have a care,’ she said through clenched teeth.’
      • ‘You look two ways at the same time, one eye upon your own valley, and the other at the terrace - but have a care!’
      be on your guard, watch out, look out, mind out, be wary, be careful, be cautious, be on the lookout, be on the alert, keep your eyes open, keep a sharp lookout, be on the qui vive
      View synonyms
  • take care

    • 1often in imperativeBe cautious; keep oneself safe.

      ‘take care if you're planning to go out tonight’
      • ‘Drivers are being warned to look out for especially shiny patches of road and to take extra care, or to avoid the section of road altogether.’
      • ‘Here, my son Matthew decided it was time to get wet and climbed along the back of the cave and behind the wall of water, taking care in the slippery and damp conditions.’
      • ‘He urged people to take care on bonfire night.’
      • ‘May you all have a safe and peaceful holiday break and please take care if you're on the road.’
      • ‘As for a friends far and wide, take care and hang out in safe places… glad that you all had a wonderful week-end…’
      • ‘Officials warned drivers to take care and pedestrians to watch for flying branches and roof tiles.’
      • ‘And if you're still in your car, don't forget to take care, watch out for children and slow down to 40 km/h near schools.’
      • ‘Our area has suffered recently from tragic accidents and our local Garda are appealing to all to drive with caution and take care.’
      • ‘Borrowing a powder horn from Balen, he pops open the top and cautiously reloads the weapon, taking care despite his inebriation to keep the powder away from the burning fuse.’
      • ‘Wellband cautions singletons to take care when buying cover.’
      be on your guard, watch out, look out, mind out, be wary, be careful, be cautious, be on the lookout, be on the alert, keep your eyes open, keep a sharp lookout, be on the qui vive
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Said to someone on leaving them.
        ‘take care, see you soon’
        • ‘Now you two have a safe trip and take care, come back soon.’
        • ‘I think it is great that you don't care what people think… well take care Sarah and stay strong!’
        • ‘I look forward to your company again next week here on All in the Mind - you take care.’
        • ‘Angel, have a nice trip, take care, and remember to e-mail me!’
        • ‘‘You take care now, young man, and watch after the others,’ said Ellie.’
        • ‘‘Okay, take care,’ Roxanne called after her and watched as Sandara gave her a smile then grabbed her bag and practically raced out.’
    • 2with infinitiveMake sure of doing something.

      ‘he would take care to provide himself with an escape clause’
      • ‘Religious leaders have an obligation to lead in the surest of ways, taking care not to disturb the faith of the ordinary believers.’
      • ‘But they took care always to spend at least 182 days out of the homeland, satisfying the taxman that they were Non-Resident Indians.’
      • ‘Although they are solid, you must take great care not to damage them as this could affect the weighting.’
      • ‘Place in an oven and check every five minutes taking care not to allow the rhubarb to overcook.’
      • ‘Successful people took care to ‘be themselves’ rather than play to the gallery and imitate someone else.’
      • ‘It's best to gently, repeatedly nudge some notions into people's minds, while taking care not to overwhelm or accuse.’
      • ‘Moo - a small, grey-haired man - took great care not to draw attention to himself.’
      • ‘This means the equine provider must inquire about the level of skill presented by the rider and take care not to provide a horse that is not manageable by someone of that skill level.’
      • ‘But he provides some reassurance that BTo was taking care not to falsely accuse anyone of sharing illegal content.’
      • ‘Cautiously, she walked towards the cave entrance, taking care not to further aggravate her wound.’
      make sure, make certain, see to it, check, verify, take care, mind, satisfy oneself, ensure
      View synonyms
  • take care of

    • 1Keep (someone or something) safe and provided for.

      ‘I can take care of myself’
      • ‘I quickly had to grow up and take care of myself and be safe and go to school and study.’
      • ‘Protect and take care of your body as best you can, it's the only thing you are sure to have forever.’
      • ‘His regalia was guarded and kept by elite guards who took care of it from reign to reign.’
      • ‘She is now attending a night college for part-time study besides taking care of her daughter.’
      • ‘Every woman can be made to look gorgeous provided she takes care of her skin and follows simple techniques of make-up, he reveals.’
      • ‘She takes care of her younger siblings and provides companionship for her mother.’
      • ‘They will take care of the birds for some time by providing feed and other requirements.’
      • ‘Raising four children and taking care of two other foster children is no easy task.’
      • ‘Sometimes one nurse has to take care of two critically ill patients at the same time.’
      • ‘My doctor believed I was finally going to die regardless of how well he and the nurses took care of me.’
      look after, care for, attend to, tend, mind, minister to, take charge of, supervise, protect, guard
      look after, tend, attend to, mind, minister to, take charge of, nurse, provide for, foster, protect, watch, guard
      View synonyms
    • 2Deal with (something)

      ‘he has the tools to take care of the electrical problem’
      • ‘If one was dealing with an adolescent tantrum, the other would take care of the laundry or getting the car fixed.’
      • ‘Looking back at his two warriors, he instructed them to guard the door as he took care of the problem.’
      • ‘Maybe that's because that idea of the university can only really stand up to examination in a world where the state takes care of almost everything.’
      • ‘Don't we have a State Department that takes care of this sort of thing?’
      • ‘Legally, Peter was her foster father because Richard took care of all that before he died.’
      • ‘I decided since it was such an important deal I would take care of it for him.’
      • ‘Because the theater at the Stardust has the quality it does, that takes care of a great deal of my frustration right there.’
      • ‘She took care of the management and made sure that the place was a pleasant place to meet.’
      • ‘A partnership manager takes care of all the fuss, all part-owners have to do is pay their money and roar on their acquisition on race-day.’
      • ‘Worst case, maybe you have a spouse or an employee that takes care of all this.’
      deal with, cope with, handle, manage, attend to, see to, take charge of, take in hand, sort out, tackle
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English caru (noun), carian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Old High German chara ‘grief, lament’, charon ‘grieve’, and Old Norse kǫr ‘sickbed’.

Pronunciation

care

/kɛr//ker/

Main definitions of care in US English:

: care1CARE2

CARE2

abbreviation

  • Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, a large private organization that provides emergency and long-term assistance to people in need throughout the world.

Pronunciation

CARE

/ker//kɛr/