Main definitions of camera in US English:

: camera1camera2

camera1

noun

  • A device for recording visual images in the form of photographs, film, or video signals.

    ‘she faced the cameras’
    ‘a photographer's camera flashed’
    ‘a video camera’
    • ‘We ascend, our cameras out of film and our slates covered in a jumble of barely decipherable notes.’
    • ‘The cameras work using two video monitors in the patrol vans which are linked to a recorder.’
    • ‘Among the hours of images caught by the cameras at King's Cross, one sequence stood out.’
    • ‘I quickly resigned myself to the fact that the film in my cameras was going to be lost.’
    • ‘Fighting broke out as security men tried to stop angry guests using cameras and video recorders.’
    • ‘During the film, the camera lingers on one wall in the bar now owned by Monty's father.’
    • ‘There, images from two cameras fighting over the same frequency are grainy and dark.’
    • ‘From time to time I get a few queries about my photographs, my camera and techniques.’
    • ‘Here in Bedford you can't even go with a camera or video recorder to the local swimming pool.’
    • ‘The cameras would record images in colour during the day and black and white at night.’
    • ‘The cameras will record digital images used to help police pursue action against criminals.’
    • ‘After burning up a roll of film Prudence lowered the camera and took the film out to replace it.’
    • ‘The man holding the video camera turned the camera on and brought the eyepiece up to his eye.’
    • ‘To his left, a film crew holding cameras and lights were filming the entire episode.’
    • ‘I might have left the camera behind but the image of this wreck was imprinted on my mind.’
    • ‘Monday I leave for Boston with a car full of cameras and film of various shapes and sizes.’
    • ‘Film from CCTV cameras in the club has been taken away as part of the police inquiry.’
    • ‘Staff at the centre can use it to download images from traffic cameras around the county.’
    • ‘When I reached him he searched me and told me to take the film out of my camera and give it to him.’
    • ‘Filmed with four cameras, the result will then be displayed on four television screens.’

Phrases

  • on (or off) camera

    • While being filmed or televised (or not being filmed or televised)

      ‘on camera, she was error-prone and nervous’
      • ‘This programme will focus on the people and places caught on camera.’
      • ‘BBC Berkshire is offering Berkshire people the chance to have their say on camera.’
      • ‘But even when there is no overt sexuality on camera, a film set is a very sexualized place.’
      • ‘However, the most hair-raising part of the film took place off camera.’
      • ‘David admits to being amazed himself by the behaviour caught on camera for the first time.’
      • ‘You will find hardly any improvising on camera anywhere in my films.’
      • ‘However, that doesn't stop the 26-year-old actor from helping out with his friend's painting and decorating business when he's off camera.’
      • ‘When she was on camera and I was off camera, they gave my samurai sword to a stuntman.’
      • ‘This protest was caught on camera by the BBC, and subsequently aired on the local news.’
      • ‘A man gestured to the reporter off camera and handed her a paper.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Latin (see camera, camera obscura).

Pronunciation

camera

/ˈkæm(ə)rə//ˈkam(ə)rə/

Main definitions of camera in US English:

: camera1camera2

camera2

noun

  • in names A chamber or round building.

    ‘the Radcliffe Camera’
    • ‘Read about a walk around the Radcliffe Camera at Oxford University, part of the Bodleian Library.’
    • ‘There is one camera in the south west of England that is painted with luminous strips.’

Phrases

  • in camera

    • In private, in particular taking place in the private chambers of a judge, with the press and public excluded.

      ‘judges assess the merits of such claims in camera’
      • ‘He knew, of course, about the bomber but all the technical details described at the inquest were held in camera and a veil soon seemed to settle over the tragic event.’
      • ‘Not only would the court have to sit in camera but neither the detained person nor his legal advisers could be present or told any of the details.’
      • ‘The Court will normally hear cases in public unless the interests of justice demand in camera proceedings.’
      • ‘The Department of Justice not only refused access to the information used by the FBI, it also objected to the judge examining them in camera.’
      • ‘If the government wants to lock someone up, they should prove it in a court, before a jury - or at worst, before a panel of judges in camera.’
      covertly, without anyone knowing, in secret, in private, privately, in confidence, confidentially, behind closed doors, behind the scenes, behind someone's back, under cover, under the counter, discreetly, unobserved, quietly, furtively, stealthily, on the sly, on the quiet, privily, conspiratorially, clandestinely, on the side
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century (denoting a council or legislative chamber in Italy or Spain): from Latin, ‘vault, arched chamber’, from Greek kamara ‘object with an arched cover’.

Pronunciation

camera

/ˈkæm(ə)rə//ˈkam(ə)rə/