Definition of cadet in English:



  • 1A young trainee in the armed services or police force.

    ‘an air force cadet’
    • ‘The exercise followed a large display at the Rokeby Police Academy for Tasmanian emergency service workers and police cadets.’
    • ‘It would be reasonable to expect that the career track to senior executive service would be similar to that of the general officer for military cadets.’
    • ‘He was one of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst cadets on their regular overseas exercise.’
    • ‘When I started in York 34 years ago as a young police cadet, it was a different world.’
    • ‘They are police cadets, young kids who are going to become policemen.’
    • ‘Approximately 200 West Point cadets will march down the Champs Elysees in Paris on July 14 as part of France's Bastille Day parade.’
    • ‘Another award winner in the Ukraine was walking his dog when a police cadet pointed out that dogs in that area must be walked with a muzzle and a leash.’
    • ‘Having attacked naval cadets, students, young children and now innocent senior citizens, the music business appears not to fear the consequences of its litigation.’
    • ‘Broome schools, naval cadets, police rangers and other community groups paid tribute at the service by laying a wreath.’
    • ‘By comparison, military cadets are 1.7 times more socially active.’
    • ‘As young West Point cadets, our motto was, ‘Duty, honor, country.’’
    • ‘We follow a young naval cadet (they weren't called Midshipmen yet) who joined the Navy football team following its first loss to West Point.’
    • ‘The young cadets will get to learn more about the different police departments from Crime Scene Investigation and Community Safety to the Support Unit and Armed Response Teams.’
    • ‘In autumn sunshine, Royal British Legion stalwarts and young uniformed cadets stood shoulder to shoulder.’
    • ‘It very clearly displays the genius of a veteran professor obviously skilled in making the inscrutable scrutable to generations of Air Force Academy cadets.’
    • ‘One is a police cadet sent on an undercover mission so deep that only two people in the Hong Kong police force know that he isn't a disgraced cop who has joined the Triads.’
    • ‘The scheme aims to provide young midshipmen and officer cadets starting at ADFA with a home away from home.’
    • ‘Old soldiers from an array of regiments rubbed shoulders with young cadets as Bobby's coffin was carried through a guard of honour.’
    • ‘The committee hopes representatives from the army cadets, sea cadets and air cadets will join the parade.’
    • ‘Navy had a few good runners but we had some good young officer cadets from ADFA that really cut them down.’
    1. 1.1A student in training at a military school.
      • ‘I suppose it wouldn't be so bad if in fact the monies it collects from everyday citizens, say a twelve-year old girl or naval cadets, actually went to the artists themselves.’
      • ‘After two strenuous months of hard work, mid-term had finally arrived for the Army Academy High School cadets on Arduous Prime.’
      • ‘On successful completion of training, a cadet becomes eligible to represent the Directorate at the national-level camp.’
      • ‘Jessye hopes to join the army when she finishes school and is doing four TEE subjects, while balancing army cadets and tennis.’
      • ‘The cadets undergo rigorous training in sailing, boat pulling and ship modelling.’
      • ‘Girl cadets are also taking part in large numbers at the camp.’
      • ‘As many as 750 cadets, including 41 girls, from eight colleges and 21 schools participated in the event.’
      • ‘The organisers of the camp had packaged the daily schedule in such way that it inculcates a spirit of adventure among the participating cadets besides enhancing their leadership quality.’
      • ‘Four teenage army cadets at an adventure camp were rushed to hospital after it is believed drinking water was spiked.’
      • ‘The suit - made from netting and hessian - took Karl, 16, an army cadet, more than 120-hours to complete.’
      • ‘Steven, a pupil at Wentworth High was an army cadet and his ambition was to become a soldier.’
      • ‘More than 300 Wiltshire Army cadets spent an action-packed fortnight honing their skills in the heart of a Sussex forest.’
      • ‘Both the boys and girls cadets teams will be competing and the top three teams in each group will qualify to the semi-final stages of the championships.’
      • ‘The group - which includes army cadets, brownies, and members of Voluntary Action Orkney - were invited meet the Queen, who is touring the country to mark her Golden Jubilee.’
      • ‘Seven boys and 15 girl cadets also formed part of the contingent that marched down the Raj Path on January 26.’
      • ‘You all chose a challenge because you joined Army cadets - I hope this has been a good experience for you.’
      • ‘These factors have to a considerable extent led to large numbers of young officers quitting and cadets dropping out of military training establishments.’
      • ‘The cadets will gain excellent training in first aid and obtain a recognised qualification.’
      • ‘I like the job and I have always had a loud voice as I used to be involved with the army cadets.’
      • ‘The crew and the training cadets from other countries kept changing through the journey so that more people could be trained and given such a valuable exposure.’
  • 2archaic, formal A younger son or daughter.

    • ‘At each corner was a tower of sufficient dimensions to make it the residence of some cadet of the family.’
    • ‘In the seventeenth century, the enforced celibacy of daughters and cadets already caused by the dowry inflation was further exacerbated by primogeniture and the triumph of the patrilineal family.’
    • ‘The man, probably a cadet of the family, held a small estate in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire.’
    • ‘A cadet of the family of the Earls of Lincoln, he espoused, along with many other scions of noble houses, the royal side in the civil war.’
    1. 2.1[usually as modifier]A junior branch of a family.
      ‘a cadet branch of the family’
      • ‘She was born on March 6, 1903, Tokyo, the eldest daughter of the Prince who headed one of the eleven cadet branches of the Imperial Family.’
      • ‘Control of the marriage of a female heiress by the cadet branches of the chiefly house, and the office of tutor or guardian within the clan, were partial answers.’
      • ‘The Dawnays, notable soldiers, were a cadet branch of The Viscounts Downe, and set Whitfield on its course of wonderful house parties for all the field sports.’
      • ‘After the investiture in 1364 of Philip the Bold as duke of Burgundy, the duchy of Burgundy became a cadet branch of the French royal house of Valois.’
      • ‘He was born on 18 May 1872 into a famous family, a cadet branch of the Dukes of Bedford.’
      • ‘Secondly, it assumes coat armour to be hereditary in the male lines of a family, with differences to distinguish cadet branches.’


Early 17th century ( cadet): from French, from Gascon dialect capdet, a diminutive based on Latin caput head The notion “little head” or “inferior head” gave rise to that of younger, junior.