Definition of burgeon in English:

burgeon

verb

[NO OBJECT]often as adjective burgeoning
  • 1 Begin to grow or increase rapidly; flourish.

    ‘manufacturers are keen to cash in on the burgeoning demand’
    • ‘The global market for malt products is growing rapidly because of beer's burgeoning popularity in developing markets.’
    • ‘Her target market is the area's burgeoning community of British expatriates.’
    • ‘Meanwhile the number of sixty-five-and-older people will burgeon, it will grow almost 55 percent.’
    • ‘As industry has burgeoned in China, so has the demand for oil.’
    • ‘China and India's appetites for oil are burgeoning, demanding more and more from the world's oil wells.’
    • ‘The conflicts in both areas now pose a threat to burgeoning American economic and strategic interests in the region.’
    • ‘In contrast, he explains, the executive branch has burgeoned, and continues to grow stronger.’
    • ‘American, British and French firms, both big and small, entered the fray as the teddy bear industry burgeoned into a multi-million dollar market of global dimensions.’
    • ‘Over the years, as the publishing world has burgeoned, and the reading public swelled, Premier Bookshop unfortunately remained the same size.’
    • ‘As the art market burgeons, the fake market will keep pace.’
    • ‘His performance is burgeoning with awkwardness and extreme fear, conveyed in nuance and physical appearance.’
    • ‘The country's middle-management class is burgeoning, but why are so few patents being filed here?’
    • ‘Central Park is rife with robins, great with grackles, and burgeoning with blue jays.’
    • ‘What had begun as an exclusive club had burgeoned into an all-comers bazaar.’
    • ‘The illegal diamond trade that was burgeoning in Kimberley ensured that there was a steady supply of prisoners.’
    • ‘Despite what many Americans may believe, the food scene in and around London is burgeoning.’
    • ‘As London and other great population centers burgeoned in the fourteenth century, forests began to vanish, and coal became the fuel of choice.’
    • ‘It seems that their main concerns lie in further expanding the already burgeoning US defence budget.’
    • ‘The Vietnam anti-war movement began to burgeon in 1965.’
    • ‘Zolo's initial interest burgeoned into a national project to support the voyage, involving the Venetian council, the Italian Naval College, and the Earl Henry St Clair Society in Canada.’
    grow rapidly, increase exponentially, increase rapidly, expand, spring up, shoot up, swell, explode, boom, mushroom, proliferate, snowball, multiply, become more numerous, escalate, rocket, skyrocket, run riot, put on a spurt
    flourish, thrive, prosper
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Put forth young shoots; bud.
      • ‘A plant burgeons, flowers and dies; it does not come back to life, grow younger and regress to the original seed.’
      • ‘Burbank studied life at its fountain head - in the marvelous little buds and shoots and leaves that burgeon forth each spring to fill us anew with the awe for nature.’
      • ‘Overhead the light streamed down through a jigsaw canopy of burgeoning foliage.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bourgeonner put out buds from borjon bud based on late Latin burra wool.

Pronunciation:

burgeon

/ˈbərjən/