Main definitions of bunk in English

: bunk1bunk2

bunk1

noun

  • A narrow shelflike bed, typically one of two or more arranged one on top of the other.

    • ‘Inside it's designed as the cabin of a ship: the bunks used to be hammocks and, even when they changed to something more solid, they were famous for having three tiers.’
    • ‘Few pirates were in there, snoozing deeply in their bunks or hammocks.’
    • ‘The beds were bunks three tiers high and without mattresses.’
    • ‘She later returned to Umm Qasr to provide a base for Royal Marines camped out in the desert - her showers, comfortable bunks and good food proved a welcome respite for the troops.’
    • ‘The bunks are laid two high in a row of four against one wall, while along the other wall are several small desks and tables, some with console screens, one with personal computer and one with a food dispenser.’
    • ‘He first checked the bunks but they were all empty.’
    • ‘Some of the crew went off-shift, stringing up hybrid bunks and hammocks belowdecks, the others continued working.’
    • ‘The building accommodated 88 people in two and three-tiered bunks in small rooms with no fire extinguishers or sprinkler system.’
    • ‘He began his sentence in the Bendigo police station cells, where up to 18 prisoners were locked in an area with bunks for five or six people.’
    • ‘Be sure crossties are under the mattress foundation of each bed and that they are secured in place even if bunks are used as twin beds.’
    • ‘He built himself a rough bach and fitted it out with four bunks, making it an ‘open house’ for men in need, old or young, drunk or sober.’
    • ‘Others are the height of luxury - sheds with windows, built in bunks and primus stoves, radios and easy chairs.’
    • ‘In lock-down means that he has been in a small 8 x 10 room (that's in feet), double bunks with a toilet and a sink for two years.’
    • ‘It was a little more than twice the size of my room in the apartment, and fit four beds - two bunks - easily.’
    • ‘Although I had only booked for two, the cabin had four bunks.’
    • ‘The band, who were all asleep at the time (very rock 'n' roll), were thrown from their bunks and some suffered minor injuries.’
    • ‘They can decide together what would be a fair way of assigning responsibilities for keeping the cabin clean, or even how the bunks are arranged.’
    • ‘Although it was converted from an old prison, the luxurious beds are far from bunks.’
    • ‘And interestingly, they've all got their names on their bunks which is extremely useful for an archaeologist.’
    • ‘Cabins are roomy, with double bottom bunks and handbasin.’
    berth, cot, bunk bed, bed
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]North american
  • Sleep in a narrow berth or improvised bed, typically in shared quarters as a temporary arrangement.

    ‘they bunk together in the dormitory’
    • ‘‘Sure,’ I said, ‘I probably should know what you do if we're going to be bunking together.’’
    • ‘Inmates had their own cells, an improvement over bunking with another con.’
    • ‘Spend nights exaggerating your catch over Scotch and bunking in vintage 1920s Pullman cars.’
    • ‘The Queenslanders were sleeping in cars or bunking in caravan parks.’
    • ‘As soon as we landed, we dropped our stuff off at the Guard base where we bunked and then picked up rental cars and hit the dance clubs.’
    • ‘Baker, Pease, Broadwater, and Lieutenant Charles B. Schofield bunked together in another tent.’
    • ‘They bunked at Meadowood resort for a week, then headed for Pebble Beach for golfing.’
    • ‘One night a week, sometimes two, I bunked at Winthrop's hovel finding that a minor improvement to a second career in local train-travel.’
    • ‘My sisters giggled to me as we lay in the dark, bunked in a guest room together: ‘You're never gonna believe what Dad thinks…’’
    • ‘We bunked together at a history convention early in our careers.’
    • ‘If you would have told me a year ago when you and I bunked together at your parent's house that we would have been friends now, I wouldn't believe you for a minute.’
    • ‘After bunking for 10 years in a two-bedroom condominium that doubled as his business office, Philip was ready to trade breakfast meetings in his pajamas for a more refined style of living.’
    • ‘Guests bunked at the swank Las Brisas and partied across the Pacific resort.’
    • ‘I know firsthand it's true that warriors like Charley are tormented in their dreams and cry out in their sleep as they re-fight their battles; yes that I know from bunking with him.’
    • ‘We grew up in a three-bedroomed bungalow, with three kids bunking together in each of the two kids' bedrooms.’
    • ‘You'll carry your own gear as you pedal a hybrid bicycle through the mango orchards, cashew groves, and savannas of the Saloum River valley, bunking in small hotels and local villagers' homes along the way.’
    • ‘The three fledgling entrepreneurs immediately moved in, bunking on the floor in sleeping bags; they began construction of a recording studio on the adjacent land.’
    • ‘We were passing a line of small log huts on a hillside, reproductions of the miserable quarters that Washington's army had bunked in, and Mwai pointed at them.’
    • ‘You know, you never mentioned that I'm bunking with one of the girls.’
    • ‘Karen and I went to West Texas State University together, and I bunked with Karen and Lisa my rookie year on tour.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: of unknown origin; perhaps related to bunker.

Pronunciation:

bunk

/bəNGk/

Main definitions of bunk in English

: bunk1bunk2

bunk2

noun

informal
  • Nonsense.

    ‘anyone with a brain cell would never believe such bunk’
    • ‘And I still have no idea whether it's total bunk or not.’
    • ‘So the Leftist explanation that ‘poverty’ keeps blacks out is sheer bunk.’
    • ‘In a democracy, this sort of offensive bunk needs to be tolerated.’
    • ‘All of this bunk is making its way around Nassau.’
    • ‘The theory that this drifter that's living in his car sneaks in - and this garage door theory, I think is a bunch of bunk.’
    • ‘In an often-quoted remark, Henry Ford, the great captain of industry, said, ‘History is more or less bunk.’’
    • ‘Interestingly if you search for it online, pretty much the first thing you get is a long page by earthquake experts explaining precisely why it's total bunk.’
    • ‘Proportional representation, for reasons on which I have ranted extensively in this house and elsewhere, is bunk.’
    • ‘Namely, that this global warming, de-forestation and pollution stuff is all bunk, the planet has never been in finer fettle etc.’
    • ‘We like to believe that history is bunk because we don't like being bound by it.’
    • ‘That he believes his own bunk is the best joke of all.’
    • ‘Does this mean I think all Eastern medicine is bunk?’
    • ‘Most trendspotting articles - especially those appearing in newsless August - are bunk.’
    • ‘On every other subject, they assure us all that ‘right is right and wrong is wrong’ and that cultural relativism is bunk from the elites.’
    • ‘I've said before that I think the supply-siders who argue that lowering our marginal tax rates will raise revenue are full of bunk.’
    • ‘Foretelling the future through astrology is bunk, right?’
    • ‘These people have abandoned their own religion as so much bunk, but have enthusiastically embraced Buddhism, which they imperfectly understand.’
    • ‘Precisely, the governor said that multiculturalism is bunk.’
    • ‘That's been shown to be complete bunk, as evidenced by the fact that Canada won last year's World Championship and the gold medal in Salt Lake City.’
    • ‘Certainly there is as much bunk out there that needs to be unmasked as nonsense or lies.’
    rubbish, balderdash, gibberish, claptrap, blarney, guff, blather, blether
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 20th century: abbreviation of bunkum.

Pronunciation:

bunk

/bəNGk/