Definition of bundle in English:



  • 1A collection of things, or a quantity of material, tied or wrapped up together.

    ‘a thick bundle of envelopes’
    • ‘He promised to put together a bundle of supplies and mail them, and I could send him a check when I received them.’
    • ‘After a couple of hours of hard work we sat in the shelter of the storage box on a bundle of wooden stakes to keep our bums from the cold wet ground, drinking lemonade and sharing a muesli bar, surveying our small slice of land.’
    • ‘On top of each bundle is a faded, yellowed photograph.’
    • ‘After he'd drop off that last bundle, there he'd be with a big ole empty covered trailer and money in his wallet, a dangerous combination.’
    • ‘The letter was thick as a pocket Bible now, a loose bundle of papers bound up with string.’
    • ‘She shouldered a full waterskin, and a bundle of wrapped dried meat and flour.’
    • ‘Can I take you then to the book of materials, the bundle of documents, page 58, and invite your attention to the accumulation of three sentences.’
    • ‘Instead, Victoria received a bundle of letters bought at auction that Hepburn wrote to her father, the British banker Joseph Hepburn-Ruston, before he died.’
    • ‘Data were acquired from patients via an optical fiber bundle coupled to a commercially available double-monochromator fluorimeter.’
    • ‘He returned with a large bundle of black cloth, collected from various members of the Treochim, and usually used by them to make garments for mourning.’
    • ‘He pulled his pack back toward him and dug rifled through it again, coming out this time with another cloth bundle and short, metal hook-like object.’
    • ‘When William Sykes was found dying by a railway in Australia in 1891 only two things were found in the hut that was his home - a dog and a bundle of letters from his loving Yorkshire wife.’
    • ‘His hand came out of the coat clutching a thick bundle of bills.’
    • ‘The principal authority on which we rely for that view is conveniently set out in the bundle of materials that the appellant has provided to the Court.’
    • ‘As he walked away, I noticed a thick bundle of music under his arm.’
    • ‘A bundle of £1,000 in cash was handed to Cllr Larkin in Conway's pub around the corner from the council's office on some date after the vote.’
    • ‘Keirian dragged his feet through the thick, white snow, hauling a large bundle of wood on his already aching back.’
    • ‘In fact, bundles will generally dry out to some degree during the summer months.’
    • ‘One had clean undergarments and the other had a bundle of blue material in her arms.’
    • ‘Last year I tied a cord around my grasses to secure it into a huge, vertical bundle, and then my husband took the chain saw and cut them down to about 1 foot high.’
    bunch, roll, clump, wad, parcel, packet, package, pack, sheaf, bale, bolt, truss, faggot, fascicle
    pile, stack, heap, mass, quantity, armful, collection, accumulation, agglomeration, lot, batch
    load, wodge
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    1. 1.1A set of nerve, muscle, or other fibers running close together in parallel.
      • ‘Normal epididymis and smooth muscle bundles were present at the edge of the tumor.’
      • ‘The stromal component, however, typically appears benign and predominantly consists of interlacing bundles of smooth muscle.’
      • ‘The midbrain is attached to the base of the cerebral hemispheres by the cerebral peduncles, two massive, flattened bundles of nerve fibres.’
      • ‘The hemorrhoidectomy specimens showed a stroma of connective tissue containing many blood vessels, and interwoven bundles of smooth muscle.’
      • ‘The endoneurium is continuous with the more abundant connective tissue perineurium, which envelops bundles of nerve fibers.’
    2. 1.2A set of software or hardware sold together.
      • ‘Prices range from $1,195 for the base version to $1,895 for the full version bundle.’
      • ‘Overall, the Asus Extreme N6800 GT is an excellent card, with a decent accessory bundle.’
      • ‘Granted, there are a lot of extras included with the MSI card, but if dumping the poor game bundle drops the price, we say go for it MSI.’
      • ‘Potentially, the customer could sell the cards and software as a bundle, or even design a turnkey workstation around the two, he said.’
      • ‘The first Sega GT on the Xbox was first released back in 2002 and soon after became part of Sega's bundle with new Xboxes.’
      • ‘This makes the 9600 Pro a light software package, but in my point of view that is for the best because with no games included in the software bundles it makes card a little less expensive.’
    3. 1.3informal A large amount of money.
      ‘the new printer cost a bundle’
      • ‘Had that canopy shattered, the incident would have cost a bundle, and we would have had to wait a long time for a new canopy.’
      • ‘These luxury apartments may cost a bundle, but certainly the path to finding God was never easier!’
      • ‘The extra tests that subsequently result, such as more X rays and tissue biopsies, can not only cost a bundle but also impose their own risks.’
      • ‘Since she already has a collection of manicure necessities, it shouldn't cost a bundle.’
      • ‘IT spending is up and systems and tools can cost a bundle.’
      • ‘Of course, the print cartridges prolly cost a bundle, but at least I can print my own photos at home now.’
      • ‘Some of you will also be lucky enough to own your own home, saving a bundle on accommodation costs, particularly if you are able to get flatmates in to share them.’
      • ‘Taxes and fees can add a bundle to flights, and some airlines advertise one-ways fares, but require a round-trip purchase.’
      • ‘Staying just outside the main centers of activity can save a bundle on the cost of accommodations and parking fees.’
      • ‘It can cost a bundle to hire a professional to refinish your floors for you, but if you have the time, you can do it yourself.’
      • ‘I knew her clothes cost a bundle, but she didn't reek of money the way others did.’
      • ‘He has no problem with the selling of mind altering herbs over the counter as long as one of his campaign contributors is making a bundle.’
      • ‘By relying on mystique and word-of-mouth, whether here or overseas, the company saves a bundle on marketing costs.’
      • ‘Practically speaking, all the stops that require dragging the wheels will put a bigger dent in your wallet since wheels cost a bundle.’
      • ‘Higher power binoculars are hard to hold steady, and good ones cost a bundle.’
      • ‘In my defense, I still read comics from time to time, though they are called graphic novels nowadays, involve a lot more thought and cost a bundle.’
      • ‘Look for Rebel Yell, Holy Grail, and all those cool t-shirts that cost a bundle.’
      • ‘Others see it as a boon for the Piggly Wiggly, a supermarket across the street from Augusta National, which could make a bundle of cash with protesters wandering aimlessly about its parking lot.’
      • ‘The heist is entertaining in its own right, but what pushes the film over the top is the extraordinary star power of the cast, which must have cost a bundle and a half.’
      • ‘If the wine were lousy, no producer could expect a high price for it just because his land cost a bundle!’
      roll, reel, spool, bale, parcel, packet, quantity, amount
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  • 1[with object] Tie or roll up (a number of things) together as though into a parcel.

    ‘she quickly bundled up her clothes’
    • ‘But these shortcomings tend to be bundled together with broader concerns over spam, viruses, hacking, and all the other sundry ills of the world.’
    • ‘As for the female performers, hair longer than the shoulder must be bundled up.’
    • ‘That is the first of the multiple fallacies bundled up in the Schröder-Köpf guide to politics: that a minister needs direct personal experience of what he or she is responsible for.’
    • ‘Rice-stalk mattresses must all be bundled up again and returned.’
    • ‘Jake tore his gaze away, and quickly bundled everything together and handed a pack to each person, hoping Freya hadn't noticed how much lighter hers was.’
    • ‘It is telling that Bunting bundles the two issues together as if they were in some sense equivalent and equally objectionable.’
    • ‘As these fibres are so tiny, more can be bundled together.’
    • ‘At times, in all the last editing, all I wanted to do was bundle up every scrap of copy, every note I'd taken and carry it home, keep it safe with me.’
    • ‘Perhaps the two cannot be bundled together so easily.’
    • ‘One easy thing for women to bundle is exercise, such as jogging, with meeting with a coworker from whom you want to learn something.’
    • ‘Stakes in small companies will be bundled together like miniature investment trusts for busy executives to snap up.’
    • ‘We'll arrange to have them all bundled up and forwarded to him together - en masse - as a declaration of our admiration and respect.’
    • ‘Most have been bundled together in a single package.’
    • ‘They they'd be bundled into parcels of three and he'd be sent to the post office on his bike to post them off.’
    • ‘In other words, the pushy-baby genes and the tough-mom genes were bundled up as a package.’
    • ‘To get the votes needed, the proposed amendments have been bundled together into one Resolution for the AGM.’
    • ‘Phrases are groups of words that can be bundled together, and they're related by the rules of grammar.’
    • ‘Trocaire hope many more thousands will be completed by the end of May when they will be bundled together and brought to a key ILO conference in Geneva in June.’
    • ‘Unit members spent most of their time counting and recounting thousands of the large shells that were bundled together in palletized groups.’
    • ‘Remember the problems we used to have when currency notes used to be bundled together with innumerable staples?’
    tie together, do up, pack together, package, packet, wind up, furl, fasten together, bale
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    1. 1.1Dress (someone) in many clothes to keep warm.
      ‘they were bundled up in thick sweaters’
      [no object] ‘I bundled up in my parka’
      • ‘All bundled up as if was expecting cold weather, he was wearing a long, tweedy coat, a bunch of scarves twisted around his head so you could hardly see his face.’
      • ‘Everyone is bundled up in their winter clothes.’
      • ‘Several questions ran through our heads as we made our way past the numerous coffee shops and bundled up against the swirling winds the port city is known for.’
      • ‘I'm going to be all bundled up and live from Strawberry Fields in New York City's Central Park, featuring special guests.’
      • ‘But I was all bundled up, and I have my Chai, so I was cozy.’
      • ‘That's why it always felt rather like victory to come home, bundled up in scarves and mittens, with a bag of loot and enjoy it among the finest of company, ourselves.’
      • ‘It was a hot day, and the baby didn't want to be bundled up.’
      • ‘His daughter (I assume), a petite redhead bundled up in a Columbia jacket, strays from her father's side as they enter the SLC.’
      • ‘I bundled up and went for my stroll about mid-morning.’
      • ‘I did get some protests about how ‘if I was going out while it's snowing, I'd best bundle up’.’
      • ‘One last note to bus drivers: You may get to spend the day on a warm bus, but some of us wait for buses in the cold and are bundled up in scarves and duffel coats.’
      • ‘And peaking just over the tops of the tin roofs, you can see two double-decker buses, their windows steamed up and their occupants bundled up in huge padded anoraks.’
      • ‘We can bask in 75 degree warmth one day and bundle up for a spring snow the next, enduring a temperature fluctuation as much as 40 degrees.’
      • ‘Either way, the forecast says bundle up for the next six weeks.’
      • ‘There were no frocks on show when the star flew in to town, though - she arrived at Glasgow Airport bundled up against the Scottish summer in a heavy duffel-coat.’
      • ‘By 5: 15 am, Cal was bundled up, in the car, and speeding uptown to the Upper East Side.’
      • ‘Across from me sit three other men, all bundled up like babies in romper suits and all sporting the same patchy frostbitten face as Scott.’
      • ‘Chances are he'll be bundled up as the weather forecast calls for temperatures just above freezing.’
      • ‘After dinner, bundled up in scarves and hats we take the Lantern Tour of Stowe.’
      • ‘We all sat a little closer together, bundled up in our sweaters and jackets, hoping to retain our body heat.’
      wrap, envelop, clothe, cover, muffle, swathe, swaddle, bind, bandage, shroud, drape, wind, enfold, sheathe, enclose, encase
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    2. 1.2Sell (items of hardware and software) as a package.
      • ‘A couple of years back Microsoft responded to moans from the corporate market about new features being bundled into service packs by promising to cut it out.’
      • ‘Sun will bundle the AppIQ software with its own storage management package by the second half of this year.’
      • ‘Offmyserver and NetSoft teamed up to bring this appliance to market, with NetSoft doing the software and Offmyserver bundling it with the hardware.’
      • ‘Tapwave already bundles web browsing software with the consoles, which to date have had to connect to a mobile phone via Bluetooth or infrared wireless links in order to provide Internet connectivity.’
      • ‘Microsoft executives bristle at talk of Trojan Horses and the suggestion that bundling its Net services into Windows is unfair.’
  • 2informal [with object] Push or carry forcibly.

    ‘he was bundled into a van’
    • ‘Out of sympathy she invited him back to her flat and they spent the weekend together but when she came home from work on the Monday he attacked her, tying her up with her own clothes and bundling her into a cupboard.’
    • ‘He strangled her following an argument and wrapped her body in bin bags, bundled it into the boot of her car and drove 100 miles to woodland in North Yorkshire, where he dumped her in a ditch.’
    • ‘He added that receptionist Rita Dixon, who was bundled up the stairs by the robbers with a gun at her back, now wanted to frame the ad and put it on the wall.’
    • ‘She bundled the cat out of his lap and helped him up.’
    • ‘Yesterday he bundled her out of the house and threw her clothes after her.’
    • ‘Several protesters were injured in the charge, and at least three dozen activists, including senior party leaders, were bundled into waiting police vans.’
    • ‘And third, that Mozart was bundled unceremoniously into a pauper's grave with miscellaneous corpses on a snowy night.’
    • ‘Mr Kelleher was bundled in a van as he walked along Great William O'Brien Street, near the city centre, around 8pm on Thursday night.’
    • ‘With no time to reflect or recover, I was bundled into a train in a semi-conscious state.’
    • ‘On the return, both Sofia and Plovdiv were fog-bound so we landed at Varna and were unceremoniously bundled on to ancient coaches for the six hour journey to Sofia.’
    • ‘Marty bundles the bunch into a limousine and Shipwreck is highly impressed with the nightlife of Los Angeles.’
    • ‘Khawri, who goes by one name, said Afghans helped the Americans, scarves wrapped around their faces, down the mountainside and bundled them into a truck.’
    • ‘For years, we've just been quietly bundling the bodies of patients off to the morgue while infection rates get higher and higher.’
    • ‘Afternoon newspapers said hundreds of protesters were arrested, while witnesses said only a few protesters were seen bundled into police vans.’
    • ‘At the airport about a third are selected and are forcibly bundled onto a clandestine flight.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the triumphant dissidents were being bundled into police vans and hauled off to the cells for a night.’
    • ‘After a difficult rescue from the rooftop, he was finally bundled into a Humvee.’
    • ‘I laid the body on the sheeting already on the floor, and then bundled the duvet into the washing machine and poured bleach over the bloodstains.’
    • ‘Alison Johnson had wrapped the children's naked bodies in old clothing and bundled them into a laundry basket, before stashing them away in the outhouse.’
    • ‘Hudson, who was wearing a black T-shirt and black leather jacket, climbed down the ladder at 10.30 am and was handcuffed by police before being bundled into a police van.’
    hustle, jostle, manhandle, frogmarch, sweep, throw, hurry, rush
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    1. 2.1Send (someone) away hurriedly or unceremoniously.
      ‘the old man was bundled off into exile’
      • ‘I finally admit that this can't be right, and Sue bundles me off to the emergency room.’
      • ‘I saw a man being bundled off a train for such an offence - and then, as if by magic, three inspectors appeared to lead him away for questioning.’
      • ‘Weeks later he is bundled off to the Isle of Man where he is to spend the foreseeable future with another 40,000 mainly Jewish, eastern European refugees.’
      • ‘But with U.S. Special Forces on the job I can see the next Ken Lay being bundled off to Guantanamo for a little hooding and electrode action.’
      • ‘The cleric was seized on his way to a mosque, bundled off to an Egyptian jail where he later says he was tortured.’
      • ‘What better solution than bundling bored and mischievous Chinese teenagers off to ‘Uncle’ Jacob in Shanghai during these hot and stuffy holidays.’
      • ‘On go the handcuffs, and we are bundled off to the police station.’
      • ‘Picked up in the INS sweep for visa violators, Gholamshahi was bundled off to Sacramento county jail in June 2002.’
      • ‘Well, over the next few weeks, a surprising number of Harry's Place bloggers have been kidnapped by their own Philocleons, and bundled off to beaches and other holiday resorts.’
      • ‘Shenyang police bundled away the chatty businessman at his plush headquarters as he prepared to lead foreign journalists on a tour of the new Sinuiju economic zone in North Korea.’
      • ‘Soon enough, she is bundled off to the Sisters as a penitent.’
      • ‘They never saw each other again and baby Dorothy was bundled off to a children's home, where she was renamed Janet Henderson.’
      • ‘Noon: hit SEND on column, feed child, bundle her off to preschool.’
      • ‘The former Health Secretary was bundled out of the Government in 1999 to fight a hopeless contest as Labour's anti-Ken candidate in the London mayoral contest.’
      • ‘Unable to persuade the driver and fellow passengers what had happened, he was eventually bundled off the bus in the mistaken belief he was a threat to the suspect.’
      • ‘And in the late evening I was bundled off to the Accident and Emergency department suffering from bad pains in the chest.’
      • ‘Tony is bundled out of the main doors, a blanket over his head.’
      • ‘Making Ahmed / Zahra come to terms with her men means bundling them out of the narrative, which explores ambiguous feelings in an unambiguous world.’
      • ‘However, after he has left, a band of raiders attacks Fegele's settlement, and she is bundled off in the middle of the night by her grandmother.’
      • ‘Have they bundled their dictators out, passed a decent set of laws, and gone about the business of leading good lives in peaceful countries?’
    2. 2.2[no object](especially of a group of people) move clumsily or in a disorganized way.
      ‘they bundled out into the corridor’
      • ‘They all bundled out in formation (if only they'd been wearing tap shoes) and then bundled back in again with Diet coke bottles in their hands.’
      • ‘As we're walking out I see her glance over at a group in the corner, but we bundle out the door pretty fast and I lead her over towards the park.’
      • ‘But it didn't last forever, and soon we were all bundling into Lydia's car, including Will, who lived in the next street from her.’
      • ‘Since it was almost 2 a.m. at this point the bar staff were starting to give us nasty looks, so we bundled into a taxi and made it home without incident.’
      • ‘Maybe it's a preventative measure to stop drunks who ran out of smokes in the pub bundling in there but it was very annoying.’
      • ‘It was Mark's leaving do - the second of his I've attended in the last year - so we all bundled down to La Perla on Charlotte Street where it was buy one get one free at the bar.’
      • ‘Somehow the image of Rupert Murdoch bundling over the road to the Dog and Duck at the end of a stressful day to get it off his chest with his News International minions doesn't quite ring true.’
      • ‘When he bundled through a cluster of bodies to set up Scott McDonald, the result was a pulled shot that slid through the legs of Chris Innes and beyond the far post.’
  • 3dated [no object] Sleep fully clothed with another person, particularly during courtship, as a former local custom in New England and Wales.

    ‘he would dance at country frolics and bundle with the Yankee lasses’
    • ‘A high degree of social control was exercised by parents and peers, as can be seen from the fact that bundling usually led to marriage and not to sexual permissiveness or high rates of single mothers.’
    • ‘Additional references, anecdotes and stories about the custom of bundling are drawn from eighteenth-century America.’


  • a bundle of fun (or laughs)

    • informal [often with negative]Something extremely amusing or pleasant.

      ‘the last year hasn't been a bundle of fun’
      • ‘Manic depression might not be a bundle of laughs, but an hour in the company of a Coked-up Carrie Fisher certainly is.’
      • ‘The future may look bleak, but sitting in slow-moving queues of traffic day after day, travelling to destinations that we should have lived much closer to, is not exactly a bundle of laughs, either.’
      • ‘On the surface the play may not sound a bundle of fun.’
      • ‘I mean, it's obviously not a bundle of laughs and you don't go round kicking up your heels and thinking, tra la-la, how lovely.’
      • ‘Bremner apart, it wasn't exactly a bundle of laughs for the delegates.’
      • ‘Because of that I got used to the pressure, used to knowing that if we lost then walking down the street past supporters would not be a whole bundle of fun.’
      • ‘He was a big bundle of fun, who always saw the funny side of things.’
      • ‘But life has not always been a bundle of laughs and he has struggled to overcome some bad times.’
      • ‘It's not a very interesting site but the topic of software is rarely a bundle of laughs and it does the job it sets out to do.’
      • ‘There is still time to see Liverpool's second Biennial which sounds like a bundle of fun.’
  • bundle of joy

    • informal A newborn baby.

      • ‘This is her third time at the Nationals, and she is a bundle of nerves.’
      • ‘When I'm a bundle of nerves you can usually find me in the kitchen spot cleaning the wood floors.’
      • ‘Feeling her skin radiating heat at the nearness of him, she was a bundle of nerves.’
      • ‘You know what a bundle of nerves I am since the robbery.’
      • ‘On Wednesday night, Lily was a bundle of nerves.’
      • ‘Her mouse is a bundle of nerves jangling at high speed.’
      • ‘Assistant manager Andy Watson is a bundle of nerves.’
      • ‘In fact, Hill drove with intense commitment and energy, but was always a bundle of nerves and self-doubt.’
      • ‘By the time she returned home she would be a bundle of nerves.’
      • ‘They called the race and the entire family was a bundle of nerves.’
      infant, newborn, child, tot, little one
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  • a bundle of nerves

    • see bundle
      • ‘I think it's odd how a succession of good, competent defenders have turned into bags of nerves who make mistakes within a month of playing next to Bramble.’
      • ‘The character on bass, who I believe is Eric Melvin from NOFX, makes a fine MC, nicely managing the exits and entrances of various drunkards, narcissists, and bags of nerves.’
    • A person who is extremely timid or tense.


Middle English: perhaps originally from Old English byndelle a binding reinforced by Low German and Dutch bundel (to which byndelle is related).