Definition of bumper in English:

bumper

noun

  • 1A horizontal bar fixed across the front or back of a motor vehicle to reduce damage in a collision or as a trim.

    • ‘Front end appeal is set off by new mesh radiator grilles, larger bumpers and tear-shaped front lamps.’
    • ‘The sharp-eyed will notice slight changes to the front bumper, upgraded xenon headlights and a modified rear spoiler.’
    • ‘Usually such damages will weaken the bumper's ability to absorb the shock of collision.’
    • ‘The sensual styling is complemented by body coloured bumpers, stylish front fog lamps and tinted glass.’
    • ‘There was no inside release for it or the rear hatch, and the hood folded forward toward the front bumper, though it had an inside release.’
    • ‘Front and rear bumpers are executed with steel beams covered with energy absorbent foam.’
    • ‘But if you truly fear death by animal, pitch the car keys: Deer kill about 14 Americans per month, mostly through collisions with front bumpers.’
    • ‘After a year, the Ford Aspire had minor changes done in that included new front and rear bumpers, headlamps, turn signals, tail lamps, and wheel covers.’
    • ‘Side rock rails matched by a similar rail under the front bumper complete the exterior changes, designed to make the Renegade the rugged image leader in the Cherokee line up.’
    • ‘The space between the front bumper and the rear edge of the engine undercover are designed to compress the airflow.’
    • ‘This airbag is deployed from just above the front bumper when a frontal collision is imminent.’
    • ‘Today's featured products include OEM-quality body and exterior auto parts like hood, bumpers, doors, fender, spoilers, wheels and headlights.’
    • ‘My friend did not move out of the way fast enough for the horn blowing couple and was actually ‘nudged’ by the front bumper of the car.’
    • ‘There was a little damage to the front bumper on the right side and he did not bother getting it fixed.’
    • ‘External changes include three air intakes and a lipped front air dam integrated into the front bumper with two circular front fog-lamps.’
    • ‘In the future the system may also deploy external airbags on the front bumpers to protect pedestrians.’
    • ‘He turned up ten minutes later with a smashed up car and his front bumper in the back seat.’
    • ‘For example, the filter assembly is placed between the open area between the front bumper and wheel.’
    • ‘Because of the split in the front bumper, the car won't be able to sit as low and drag, or the front dam will be worn off, resulting in a massive loss of downforce.’
    • ‘The front corners are more chamfered, the headlights cut into the bumper, flanking a lower front grille.’
    1. 1.1North American A shock-absorbing piston projecting from a cross-beam at the end of a railway track or at the end of a railway vehicle.
  • 2archaic A generous glassful of an alcoholic drink, typically one drunk as a toast.

    • ‘On my way home I stopped in at the tavern and drank a bumper of whiskey, something I had not indulged in for the last five or six years.’
    • ‘He who drank a bumper on his knees to the health of his mistress, was dubbed a knight for the evening.’
    • ‘There are whole pages full of Masonic toasts from which the presiding officer could select, and after every one of which a bumper was drunk by the Brethren present.’

adjective

  • Exceptionally large, fine, or successful.

    ‘a bumper crop’
    • ‘The fine weather brought out bumper crowds to watch the outdoor theatre, music and parades.’
    • ‘In many areas, this year's bumper crop means exceptionally high removal of nutrients.’
    • ‘India began exporting wheat and rice two years ago to cut bulging stocks built up after successive bumper harvests.’
    • ‘Outdoor Soccer attracted bumper crowds and ran to a very successful conclusion at the KDL and Park grounds.’
    • ‘Even thought the Eucalyptus trees look like they have a bumper crop of gum nuts, these are the first birds I've seen feeding on them.’
    • ‘Earlier this year, the Zimbabwean government claimed it would be harvesting a bumper maize crop of 2.4 million tons.’
    • ‘According to the Christian Science Monitor, this year also produced a bumper opium crop in addition to a good wheat harvest.’
    • ‘There were thousands of acres [of wheat] sown in our vicinity this fall and prospects for a bumper crop are fine so far this winter.’
    • ‘We've had a bumper crop of Bramley cooking apples on our old tree, for the first time since we moved here nearly three years ago.’
    • ‘Broad beans are positively bursting with health and promise a bumper crop any minute now.’
    • ‘It comes on the back of another record, bumper profit result for Qantas.’
    • ‘But hooray, my parsnips have germinated at a fantastic rate this year, and we're in for a bumper crop, something I've never managed before.’
    • ‘In just a few weeks, a bumper crop of one million kilos of strawberries will have been picked from Pole House Farm on the Harwich Road in Lawford.’
    • ‘Suddenly, within a year, he has me down to shoot my own film, turning script into bumper profit.’
    • ‘At the age of 75, the brothers still work side-by-side on neighbouring allotments, cultivating a bumper crop of vegetables every year.’
    • ‘In 1977 we had a bumper crop, enough for fresh eating and a pie!’
    • ‘What does a bumper crop of acorns have to do with the deer tick population?’
    • ‘And another bumper crop is on the way thanks to abundant rain.’
    • ‘Hopefully we will have a fine weekend and bumper crowds.’
    • ‘Although the banks' bumper profit growth dominated the figures, the rest of Scotland plc still managed to post gains of 9%.’
    abundant, rich, heavy, healthy, bountiful, goodly, large, big, huge, immense, massive, exceptional, unusual, good, excellent, fine, magnificent, lovely, vintage, superabundant, prolific, profuse, copious, profitable
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century (in bumper (sense 4 of the noun)): from bump + -er. bumper (sense 4 of the noun) derives from the earlier form bumping, meaning ‘very large, great’, and is the source of the adjective meaning ‘exceptionally large, fine, or successful’, as in a bumper year. bumper (sense 3 of the noun) is said to be from an earlier racing term meaning ‘amateur rider’.

Pronunciation

bumper

/ˈbəmpər//ˈbəmpər/