Main definitions of buffet in English

: buffet1buffet2buffet3

buffet1

noun

  • 1A meal consisting of several dishes from which guests serve themselves.

    as modifier ‘a cold buffet lunch’
    • ‘That is always assuming that they can fit it all in after having been served up a full buffet breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and home-made cakes and canapés.’
    • ‘This country style sideboard gives you just the space you need space to store extra dishes, plates and platters, plus room to layout a sumptuous buffet.’
    • ‘Guests were treated to a magnificent buffet lunch, most lavishly set up in a huge white air-conditioned tent.’
    • ‘It was artistic and effective, and the more than 900 guests enjoyed the bountiful buffets of superb food set up everywhere.’
    • ‘Local residents enjoyed a champagne reception on arrival, a lavish buffet of hot and cold dishes all served with live piano music.’
    • ‘After the show, guests enjoyed the buffet of Egyptian food which always tastes as good as it looks.’
    • ‘Adding to the authenticity of the occasion will be a buffet dinner to serve as the wedding reception.’
    • ‘Tickets cost 20 Euro and the buffet will be served at 9.30 sharp.’
    • ‘We didn't have the typical wedding with bridesmaids, 200 guests and a mile-long buffet with an ice sculpture.’
    • ‘The evening buffet features the particular dishes from the selected province, plus fare from other areas.’
    • ‘Guests were treated to a buffet style lunch to sample some of the cuisine with efficient and friendly service to match.’
    • ‘This buffet meal of cold and hot hors d' oeuvres often includes various forms of herring, meats, cheeses, and vegetables.’
    • ‘The Prime Minister and his wife were also taken on conducted tour of the hall, and a buffet lunch was served for the guests.’
    • ‘If you bring your children, let them participate in an egg hunt in the hotel garden while you enjoy your buffet.’
    • ‘The restaurant had many Afghan, Indian and local dishes in their buffet range.’
    • ‘At the end of your round a buffet lunch will be served in the club's temporary clubhouse.’
    • ‘All students, parents and guests enjoyed a buffet in the School Library to finish off the evening's celebrations.’
    • ‘Following the concert, guests moved into the dining room for a bountiful buffet of superb Norwegian specialties.’
    • ‘The best meal of the day was, without doubt, breakfast, which is served as a buffet, but is essentially a feast of 20 or so heaving tables offering more dishes than anyone could sample in a week.’
    • ‘A buffet supper will be served and full bar facilities will be available.’
    cold table, cold meal, self-service, smorgasbord
    View synonyms
  • 2A room or counter in a station, hotel, or other public building selling light meals or snacks.

    • ‘He's an average man - not too bright, not over-ambitious - but is delighted to have a beautiful wife, May, who runs the station buffet.’
    • ‘The buffet on the station was icy cold, with a failed heating system.’
    • ‘There's no dining car, which adds a bit of adventure - you have to judge your stops and make dashes for the station buffet.’
    • ‘It tasted as if it had sat on a railway-station buffet for weeks.’
    • ‘The railway has six superbly restored gas-lit stations, a fleet of steam locomotives and historic carriages, a Museum of Rail Travel at Ingrow, buffets at Keighley and Oxenhope - and even a CAMRA real ale bar on many trains.’
    cafe, cafeteria, snack bar, canteen, salad bar, refreshment counter, refreshment stall, restaurant
    View synonyms
  • 3North American dated A cabinet with shelves and drawers for keeping dinnerware and table linens; a sideboard.

    • ‘This pair of buffets will be returned to their original positions on the piers of the recently redecorated Saloon.’
    • ‘Among them a lamp cap, frames, wax holders, tissue boxes, trays, plates, tables, chairs, buffets, and many others.’
    • ‘Ben moved to the buffet and withdrew several linen napkins.’
    • ‘Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk One of a pair of mid nineteenth-century antiquarian buffets, incorporating seventeenth-century Flemish carvings.’
    • ‘She took her clean house-dress from a pile of three that she had carefully hidden in the buffet drawer under the kitchen towels.’
    • ‘For rustic country decor in the kitchen, use open shelves, hutches, buffets, plate racks and cupboards for storage.’
    sideboard, cabinet, china cupboard, counter
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century (denoting a sideboard): from French, from Old French bufet ‘stool’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

buffet

/bəˈfeɪ//bəˈfā/

Main definitions of buffet in English

: buffet1buffet2buffet3

buffet2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1(especially of wind or waves) strike repeatedly and violently; batter.

    ‘the rough seas buffeted the coast’
    no object ‘the wind was buffeting at their bodies’
    • ‘The two figures stumbled across the dunes, buffeted by the wind and sand.’
    • ‘But it would take a powerful insect, or a very brave bird, to pollinate the plants that cling to exposed slopes, consistently buffeted by thirty-mile-an-hour winds.’
    • ‘The frail craft, though buffeted by violent winds and sudden air pockets, stayed aloft.’
    • ‘The international order is like a mighty river and our region is but a small boat buffeted by angry waves.’
    • ‘If the pound's mid-Atlantic pattern continues - being buffeted by waves from Europe and North America but not moving much - there will be little to worry about.’
    • ‘As you might expect, the path is exposed to the elements; sometimes it is blessed by sun and clear skies while the rest of the peninsula is in rain, and at other times it is buffeted by strong winds and rain coming in from the sea.’
    • ‘In winter the island is buffeted by arctic winds, and in early summer the north coast is battered by icebergs floating down from Greenland.’
    • ‘The world has been buffeted by waves of terror that have traumatised Eastern as well as Western societies.’
    • ‘I walked from the valley below to both of the fog-free summits, buffeted by ocean winds.’
    • ‘We rope the house to trees along the shore to prevent it from drifting away when we are buffeted by strong winds during the area's frequent tempests.’
    • ‘Fifty years ago on October 26 black clouds swirled over the mouth of the Firth of Tay as the east coast of Scotland was buffeted by fierce winds.’
    • ‘Veterans from across the United States returned to find Bastogne covered in snow and buffeted by biting winds - just as it was during that bitterly cold December of 1944.’
    • ‘We were expecting to step outside at the end of the evening and be buffeted by high winds and soaked by torrential rain.’
    • ‘The ferry was traveling from Puerto Galera to Batangas City on Luzon Island when it was buffeted by large waves and strong winds around 7 a.m.’
    • ‘It's beautiful in summer, he says, but not quite so today, the back of the house buffeted by howling winds and Biblical rains coming in across the river.’
    • ‘It was so dark they could not see each other as their tree was buffeted by strong winds caused by Cyclone Debbie.’
    • ‘Strong gusts of wind buffeted the Messerschmitt and the captain missed his target.’
    • ‘Storm whips up from the Antarctic and joggers pound along a waterfront buffeted by wind.’
    • ‘He wants to learn how the peregrine does it, how a bird can fly hundreds of miles a day, feeding sporadically and buffeted by uncooperative winds.’
    • ‘Amazingly you don't get buffeted by the wind even when you drive fast.’
    batter, pound, beat against, dash against, knock against, push against, lash, strike, hit, bang
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Knock (someone) over or off course.
      ‘he was buffeted from side to side’
      • ‘The sidewalk is narrow and the pedestrian is buffeted on one side by traffic, on the other by the proximity of the plunge and the meagre hip-height railing.’
      • ‘The Seminole shook as she was buffeted by the two explosions and alarms announced more hull breaches and damage.’
      • ‘But she was again buffeted away, as helpless as a dandelion seed.’
      • ‘White feathered wings buffeted him aside, the silver-white dragon looking down on him with a slightly distant expression.’
      • ‘When the ball did reach him, he was constantly buffeted by the Faroes' burly rearguard and struggled to make it stick.’
      • ‘In the winter of 1972 while staying in the Circuit House at Saharsa I happened to see the then Chief Minister being buffeted and abused by an angry crowd of legislators and politicians.’
      • ‘Jumped on the 8:36 to Cannon Street, got buffeted and barged by all the commuters and knocked off balance by the big backpack on me.’
      • ‘Debris pelted down from the rolled edges of the fireball like meteors, buffeting those who had been lucky enough to avoid the initial explosion, slamming them to the ground.’
      • ‘Tears were ripped from her eyes as she was buffeted by the blast.’
      • ‘He took plenty of hard knocks and got up to give plenty of hard knocks, took a good pack mark, buffeted Richardson out of position in marking duels, punched the ball clear and is a stylish left foot kick.’
    2. 1.2 (of misfortunes or difficulties) afflict or harm (someone) repeatedly or over a long period.
      ‘they were buffeted by a major recession’
      • ‘Between the two, we are buffeted by profit, partisanship and passions.’
      • ‘But didn't Greene really mean this thriller/romance to be yet another of his expositions on the emotional frailty of men buffeted by love and betrayal?’
      • ‘There's something about her on-screen bearing that invites tragedy, her characters are relentlessly buffeted by ill-fortune.’
      • ‘Perhaps bond yields are signaling an economic slowdown, but it appears more like they are being buffeted by financial instability.’
      • ‘Brazil has also been buffeted by the huge social and economic crisis in neighbouring Argentina - a crisis that led to last December's uprising there.’
      • ‘Noise pollution is insidious says actor Randy Hughson, who brings his portrayal of Doyle, a man buffeted by incessant noise, to the Magnetic North Festival.’
      • ‘The understudies start by reading from books, but by the magic of theatre these are soon dropped, and the play takes over, its passage buffeted by the mayhem going on all around it.’
      • ‘Or they were tormented souls, buffeted by external dilemmas and prior vulnerabilities.’
      • ‘Over the last few weeks, Gilbert has been buffeted from all sides by furious investors, politicians, analysts, the media, other fund managers and industry regulators.’
      • ‘Their personal relationship is buffeted by the external and public events of the play - identity, community, multiculturalism and the hold of a community over its members.’
      • ‘An immigrant buffeted by war and with little formal education, he learnt his trade as an intern before marching out on his own as a photojournalist.’
      • ‘Without firm, deep foundations, faith is likely to topple over whenever it is challenged by the difficulties that life buffets us with.’
      • ‘The garbage situation reflects the never-ending mess that buffets the country's two-and-a-half year administration.’
      • ‘Wherever we might go, many of the forces buffeting people's lives are similar.’
      • ‘In September 1897, buffeted by personal and professional difficulties, as well as conflicts with leading German feminists, she entered a mental hospital.’
      afflict, trouble, harm, distress, burden, bother, beset, harass, worry, oppress, strain, stress, tax, torment, blight, bedevil, harrow, cause trouble to, cause suffering to
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1dated A blow, typically of the hand or fist.

    • ‘Edgar struck him a buffet on the face which sent him reeling backwards.’
    • ‘But this blow was but a buffet with the hand, compared with the thunderbolt that fate was preparing to launch against my bosom.’
    • ‘Soothly, as he followed after me, I had a mind to turn about and deal him a buffet on the face, to see if I could but draw one angry word from him.’
    1. 1.1 A shock or misfortune.
      ‘the daily buffets of urban civilization’
      • ‘Why count the possible buffets and ignore the rewards of fortune?’
      • ‘What is even more violent is that in order to escape further pain and buffets, Cheryl found herself clinging for salvation in this instant to the very same social yardstick used to measure her a non-person.’
      • ‘To experience the enervating, exasperating and humbling feeling that comes from trying to plumb the depths of this most amazing subject we call mathematics, is to transcend the limits of human capability and fortify oneself against the buffets of life.’
      shock, jolt, jar, upset, setback, crisis, catastrophe, blow
      View synonyms
  • 2Aeronautics

    another term for buffeting
    • ‘Stalls are typical and predictable with power on or off and sufficient warning buffet to prevent surprises.’
    • ‘As an old fighter-pilot, I don't like buffet because sometimes it signals a pre-stall condition.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, I sensed the uneasy feeling of the aircraft going into stall buffet.’
    • ‘Even at a high rate of plummet there is very good control at 150 kph accompanied by a lot of wind around the windscreen and a lot of air-frame buffet.’
    • ‘This unit had to be carefully installed to ensure a tight fit, but it also virtually eliminated the tail buffet.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French buffeter (verb), buffet (noun), diminutive of bufe ‘a blow’.

Pronunciation

buffet

/ˈbəfət//ˈbəfət/

Main definitions of buffet in English

: buffet1buffet2buffet3

buffet3

noun

Scottish, Northern English
  • A low stool or hassock.

    • ‘There was a buffet beneath one window, and china closets flanked the fireplace where a fire crackled behind the fender.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French bufet, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

buffet

/ˈbəfət//ˈbəfət/