Definition of buckler in US English:

buckler

noun

historical
  • A small round shield held by a handle or worn on the forearm.

    • ‘The London Masters taught the traditional English weapons, in particular the sword and buckler.’
    • ‘It is interesting to note that while some 16th century fencing masters, such as di Grassi, include among the combinations of arms they teach, sword and buckler, sword and square target, or sword and round target, Palladini does not.’
    • ‘Some archers wore virtually no defensive equipment and were even barefoot, carrying perhaps a small buckler as well as a sword, dagger, or lead maul.’
    • ‘Take up shield and buckler; arise and come to my aid.’
    • ‘Inexcusably perhaps, the entire vital element of seizures, grappling, disarms, and use of the second hand or even daggers and bucklers is almost wholly ignored as if it never existed.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French (escu) bocler, literally ‘(shield) with a boss’, from bocle ‘buckle, boss’ (see buckle).

Pronunciation

buckler

/ˈbək(ə)lər//ˈbək(ə)lər/