Main definitions of broil in US English:

: broil1broil2

broil1

verb

[with object]North American
  • 1Cook (meat or fish) by exposure to direct, intense radiant heat.

    ‘he broiled a wedge of sea bass’
    ‘a broiled sirloin steak’
    • ‘Trim away skin and fat before cooking, then broil, grill, roast or poach instead of frying.’
    • ‘Rice eventually came into play another night, as a sticky bed for a Japanese-inspired special of sweetly glazed broiled eel.’
    • ‘If you told me that my fish was broiled, I used to think that meant it was thrown directly on a flame or cooked in an ancient Mayan crockpot.’
    • ‘Eat lean meat, roast or broil foods rather than fry them and replace high-fat dairy products with skim milk and low-fat yogurt and cheeses.’
    • ‘They ordered broiled Haddock filet and Caesar salad.’
    • ‘Grill and broil your meats, which melts the fat.’
    • ‘When finding a restaurant, the thrill is in finding out the range of skill and mastery each chef has of several techniques - Can they broil a steak and create a perfect, matching sauce?’
    • ‘A standard meal consists of rice, soup, kimchi (a spicy Korean pickle), vegetables, and broiled or grilled meat or fish.’
    • ‘Every piece of meat I encountered here was impeccably broiled and seasoned.’
    • ‘Although many of her recipes are still secrets, dishes like broiled tilapia with turmeric and dill, Vietnamese chicken salad, and a saucy eggplant-tofu ragout let you replicate An's signature blend of the familiar and the exotic.’
    • ‘Even the lemon wedge could not perk it up, nor could the minute bowl of rice and broiled tomato au gratin that accompanied it.’
    • ‘When you grill, fry, or broil meat, it forms carcinogenic compounds.’
    • ‘Some lean meat morsels you may want to munch include skinless cuts of roasted, baked or broiled poultry and seafood.’
    • ‘A waitress stands at every table to broil the meat and then cut it into small pieces with scissors to serve diners.’
    • ‘Bake for 10 minutes; then turn on the broiler and broil the gratin 3 or 4 inches from the heat source for 2 or 3 minutes, just to brown the top.’
    • ‘When cooked - you can bake, broil, grill, sauté or even microwave it - the flesh becomes tender and richly sweet.’
    • ‘Grill, broil or cook patties in a nonstick fry pan, about 5 minutes per side until done.’
    • ‘Choose grilled, baked or broiled foods instead of fried.’
    • ‘Dips and combinations of condiments for sauces, such as hot bean paste, vinegar, and soy, accompany such dishes as barbecued or broiled meats, deep-fried vegetables, etc.’
    • ‘You're going to have to learn to broil a steak; that's what you're going to have to learn.’
    grill, toast, barbecue, cook, fry, bake
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Become very hot, especially from the sun.
      ‘the countryside lay broiling in the sun’
      • ‘Young Tess and her neighborhood friends are broiling in the hot sun, their inner city block having been deprived of moisture for a long time.’
      • ‘At the only Home Depot in this coastal town, 75 people broiled under a cloudless sky in temperatures that approached 90 as they waited for tarps, gas cans and other supplies to begin repairs.’
      • ‘Frequently dragging the sleeves of our flight suits across our brows during the start. and runup sequences, we broiled in the aircraft and stopped sweating only at Flight Level 290.’
      • ‘In the afternoon everyone's broiling in the pit; at rush hour it's dense and frenetic.’
      • ‘And if you're not broiling in the sun and wearing enough sunscreen, you're safe, right?’
      hot, scorching, roasting, baking, boiling, boiling hot, blistering, sweltering, parching, searing, blazing, sizzling, burning, burning hot, sultry, torrid, tropical, like an oven, like a furnace
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘burn, char’): from Old French bruler ‘to burn’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

broil

/brɔɪl//broil/

Main definitions of broil in US English:

: broil1broil2

broil2

noun

archaic
  • A quarrel or commotion.

    • ‘When Cleopatra speaks for the first time, she too wants to assert her own role as an evil woman in this broil, but her serving women, Charmion and Eras, refuse to allow her an easy passage to her proposed death.’
    • ‘An ensuing exchange with the woman's male partner, and Dix quickly gets into a broil.’
    • ‘The recent broil over Baraka's recital of the poem ‘Somebody Blew Up America’ has only served to intensify the poet's controversial status.’

Origin

Early 16th century: from obsolete broil ‘to muddle’. Compare with embroil.

Pronunciation

broil

/broil//brɔɪl/