Definition of broad in English:

broad

adjective

  • 1Having an ample distance from side to side; wide.

    ‘a broad staircase’
    • ‘Mary buries her face into Ace's broad shoulder.’
    • ‘Faced with the blank white page, I tried to visualize the knoll where I sat, gazing across a broad area of the river to a point where some birds were roosting.’
    • ‘Over all is a brilliant blue sky with broad white streaks, and horizontal lines of tiny crosses representing, presumably, stars.’
    • ‘To get such a line across the neck suggests something broad had been pressed into the neck.’
    • ‘Lifeline Sudan flies in Hercules in broad circles over the area days before food drops.’
    • ‘Burlap reappears in Work II as the ground on which Jensen painted broad, black brushstrokes suggesting a Japanese mountain landscape.’
    • ‘He had huge shoulders and a broad back which tapered to an extraordinarily small waist.’
    • ‘The broad, blue river flowed past with infinite patience and slow, deep inevitability, and the thought of that much water in one place was daunting.’
    • ‘One was a tremendously tall man, with broad shoulders and huge muscles.’
    • ‘On the left hand side of the room was a broad staircase leading up, and on the right was a lamp lit hallway.’
    • ‘It was this colour that tinted his broad moustache, and the short, precise goatee on his chin.’
    • ‘Along one side rose a broad staircase, while a door on the left led into the kitchen and a couple more opened out at the far end.’
    • ‘A large bay flows into a broad blue river that flows through the heart of the city.’
    • ‘Thailand's flag consists of a broad blue horizontal band at the center, with narrower bands of stripes above and below it; the inner ones are white, the outer ones red.’
    • ‘Combat units line up shoulder to shoulder across a broad front to face the enemy, which organizes its units in much the same fashion.’
    • ‘At last we left the main highway and turned into a still narrower road, barely one lane wide, with broad dirt shoulders.’
    • ‘The Huilloc men are only a little taller than their womenfolk, with broad chests, powerful shoulders and heavily muscled legs.’
    • ‘The men all had identical bodies - huge shaved pecs, broad shoulders, tans and tan lines, white smiles, slightly bulging eyes and bland faces.’
    • ‘She wore a white top, with broad light blue sleeves.’
    • ‘The second stretches northward along the littoral, fanning outward to the east in a broad arc encompassing the area around Aleppo.’
    wide, large, big
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    1. 1.1 (after a measurement) giving the distance from side to side.
      ‘the valley is three miles long and half a mile broad’
      • ‘Lough Ennell or Belvidere Lake, southwest of Mullingar, is 5 miles long and 2 miles broad.’
      • ‘The castle itself was measured as being 56 feet high, 56 feet broad, and 38 feet in width, and the thickness of the walls was said to be 8 feet.’
      • ‘The island Britain is 800 miles long, and 200 miles broad.’
      in breadth, in width, from side to side, wide, across, thick
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    2. 1.2 Large in area; spacious.
      ‘a broad expanse of prairie’
      • ‘In these slides, a broad area of snowpack breaks away and begins moving downhill as a cohesive mass riding over an ice sheet or bare ground.’
      • ‘They need to go out in the middle of a sinkhole area and try to find the confining layer - to see if it covers a truly broad area - but they don't do that.’
      • ‘At the pyramid's apex, the route emerges onto the Shoulder, a broad hump at roughly 26,000 feet and the site of the fourth and final camp before reaching the top.’
      • ‘The hydrothermal system created by the Sudbury impact also dissolved minerals containing copper and other metals from a broad area and then concentrated them in rich veins.’
      • ‘Running buffalo clover once occurred over a broad area of the Midwest.’
      • ‘On the left, at a slightly higher level, is a broad parking area.’
      • ‘Now, as I look at the graphic behind you there, Max, as we see that, that's a broad area that you have there for a danger zone.’
      • ‘This procedure made SEHEM one of the first validated models for predicting growth of rangeland grasses over a very broad area.’
      • ‘The active phase is usually associated with broad areas of cloud and rain, with sustained moderate to fresh northwesterly winds on the north side of the trough.’
      • ‘The present study shows that sequence divergence within a lineage of Pokey is extremely low even across very broad geographic areas.’
      • ‘He felt that one would need a significant crack for a fast flow of water between the joints, unless the water accumulated over a broad horizontal area and then formed one rivulet.’
      • ‘The sink-under-counter style of installation, common in Brazil, provides a clean look and allows a broad drainage area.’
      • ‘There are several hybrid zones, and often mixtures of phenotypes associated with different subspecies exist over relatively broad geographic areas.’
      • ‘When searching, it's important to be specific in your query to avoid getting search results from too broad an area.’
      • ‘The sand in the lag deposit arrived at the shore through the action of streams and rivers, meaning that it was collected over a broad area and concentrated in this shore deposit.’
      • ‘The general seizures will cause loss of consciousness, and affects the whole body and may occur over a broad area of the brain.’
      • ‘While the game examined a broad array of mission areas, our focus was on how the key mission areas of SMDC affect the Objective Force.’
      • ‘I cross the broad area in front of Pass Creek at the 13 mile mark, note the strength of the venturi in the pass as significant, then drive into Red Rocks.’
      • ‘Five upward-facing tines Dr. Baker capture tissue and spread pressure over a broad area, facilitating sturdy fixation and reattachment.’
      extensive, vast, immense, great, spacious, expansive, sizeable, sweeping, rambling, rolling, ample, spread out, far reaching, boundless, immeasurable
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  • 2Covering a large number and wide scope of subjects or areas.

    ‘a broad range of experience’
    • ‘We know, and I am sure you know, Mr Chairman, how broad the scope and subject of the Resource Management Act is.’
    • ‘It deals with aspects of the subject at once very broad and very limited.’
    • ‘People who have a broad interest in the subject but who lack the historical and ideological framework for a fuller, informed reading, will be gently and entertainingly enlightened here.’
    • ‘This is a very broad provision, which subjects a wide range of activity to potential criminal penalties.’
    • ‘Students study a broad choice of subjects over two years, together with a programme of studies designed to develop the student and foster his or her analytical, social and creative skills.’
    • ‘I am impressed by the broad treatment of related subjects in this book.’
    • ‘Hoop Dreams, Stevie, and Reel Paradise cover a broad range of subject matter, but they all have to do with what benefactors owe to the people they help.’
    • ‘It was obvious how diverse all of your interests were, and so I've tried to offer a broad scope of subjects without making one seem more important than the other.’
    • ‘Passionate about space, they proposed a university dedicated to a broad range of space-related subjects for graduate students from all parts of the world.’
    • ‘Though its title initially suggests an impossibly broad subject, The Black Experience is the story of one Pan-African man.’
    • ‘However, that's sort of unfortunate since democracy thrives when citizens are able to debate a broad range of subjects rather than deferring to the judgment of the experts.’
    • ‘Inevitably with such a broad scope and a range of contributors the overall quality is uneven.’
    • ‘The subject matter is broad and connects readily with various branches and sub-disciplines of philosophy including the philosophies of law and of economics.’
    • ‘The scope is broad, ranging from international to local events.’
    • ‘Though primarily a botanist, he demonstrated a broad interest in other subjects, as well.’
    • ‘It's a broad subject and just about every aspect of the course was examined in the ordinary and higher-level papers.’
    • ‘I have a shallow but broad knowledge of the subject.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, it provides a broad treatment of the subject, including its historical, mechanical, and human dimensions.’
    • ‘The observations of travellers to Scotland dating back to the 1540s is the subject of this broad selection of material on display at the National Library of Scotland.’
    • ‘Whilst not wanting to obscure these differences, the aim of this paper is to present a broad overview of its subject matter and will discuss English and Scottish beliefs as a whole.’
    comprehensive, inclusive, extensive, wide, wide-ranging, broad-ranging, encyclopedic, all-embracing
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    1. 2.1 Having or incorporating a wide range of meanings, applications, or kinds of things; loosely defined.
      ‘three broad categories of mutual funds’
      • ‘I've come to the conclusion that they are invoking an unwritten rule, a rule with broad application and ramifications.’
      • ‘It also offers a broad range of software applications and hardware dedicated to the land development market.’
      • ‘This is one example of a math fact strategy that develops number sense in children and potentially has a broad application in mathematics learning.’
      • ‘The above two cases illustrate how broad patents can limit research.’
      • ‘Since space and missile operations have a wide application, civilian applications are equally broad.’
      • ‘One or more broad objectives are defined for each topic.’
      • ‘At the same time, Becker notes, the discipline is broad in theory and application, including a wide range of experimental and applied work.’
      • ‘He is talking about old Europe but his point has broad application.’
      • ‘The main danger of awarding overly broad patents is that they could stifle research; scientists may be wary of carrying out research in certain areas for fear of breaching another party's patent.’
      • ‘They are a small firm with some big ideas for the broad applications of nanotechnology.’
      • ‘Its range of applicability is broad and seeks to gain understanding of every aspect of the biological world.’
      • ‘It can be said that there are a number of categories or classes of case within the broad description of applications made by maternal primary carers.’
      • ‘A renewable, tissue culture source of human cells capable of differentiating into a wide variety of cell types would have broad applications in basic research and therapeutic techniques.’
      • ‘Thankfully, it seems hard to imagine that Disney will be granted this rather broad patent.’
      • ‘I define feminism in the broad terms of any deed or action that promotes the equality and liberation of women.’
    2. 2.2 Including or coming from many people of many kinds.
      ‘broad support for the president's foreign policy’
      • ‘The resolution was put forward by the Red Vote Alliance Party, and it received broad support from the Labor Party, the Center Party, and a member of the Progress Party.’
      • ‘The issue is that to be effective, cultural rebellion, by definition, has to be acting in opposition to something with broad support.’
      • ‘Still to come, a four-star general with seemingly broad political appeal announces he's running for president.’
      • ‘As councillors Ryan and Roche got used to their new positions with the broad support of their Council colleagues yesterday, tensions were running somewhat high elsewhere.’
      • ‘But from within Mr Sharon's own Cabinet I think there was broad support for this strike, and in fact there's more support for him to go even further, as I said.’
      • ‘Instead, he's drawing broad support from the middle, all those moderates who don't associate themselves with either party.’
      • ‘This has broad coalition support and it's bipartisan, and I hope that it can be the real center of discussion as we solve this problem.’
      • ‘Bush reached out for the broad support of Americans on Wednesday, even those who voted against him.’
      • ‘Support was broad and bipartisan; contrary to what is often assumed today, a higher proportion of Republicans than of Democrats supported the bill.’
      • ‘The Chief Executive of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Peter Hendy, says unions are set to fail in its push to get broad community support.’
      • ‘Finally, this poll is being cited as showing broad support for affirmative action and a rejection on the Administration's position in the Michigan cases.’
      • ‘Clearly there's some unfairness of the tax code; it's got broad support if we eliminate the marriage penalty tax and the death tax.’
      • ‘Home Rule was not a natural demand of the working class, and Biagini exaggerates the anti-statism of the working class, as there was broad support for intervention and regulation of the economy.’
      • ‘The dot scot campaign has received broad support from industry, and is seen as a means towards advancing Scotland's image as a cutting-edge country to do business with.’
      • ‘A Washington Post editorial described him as being ‘the sort of future leader capable of winning broad support’.’
      • ‘The criticism of McConnell's project comes despite broad support from across Scotland's political spectrum about his attempts to come to the aid of Malawi.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Fine Gael councillor John Browne said he was encouraged by the broad support he received at the recent meeting of Carlow County Council when he raised the matter.’
      • ‘One of main reasons for the channelling of large proportions of conservation funds to these species has been that these animals can be used as flagships to gain broad support.’
      • ‘The regime demands formal negotiations leading to economic assistance and broad support for its internal security.’
      • ‘But Boyko disagreed, saying that anybody who thinks there is broad support for such a proposal is ‘delusional.’’
  • 3General; without detail.

    ‘a broad outline of NATO's position’
    • ‘This seems like a broad generalisation, but studies have shown what I just explained.’
    • ‘In fact, this is another reason why we believe that a broad definition of the subject is most helpful to the student.’
    • ‘When I was making Weed Forestin, I was writing in incredibly general, broad terms.’
    • ‘And twenty million resident aliens live suddenly subject to the exceedingly broad terms of a new martial law.’
    • ‘Beyond that, I'm reluctant to make broad generalizations.’
    • ‘As a general orientation, its broad contours may frequently be discernible in social research, but it is also the case that we often find departures from it.’
    • ‘These are all very broad, general traits and there are always exceptions.’
    • ‘This is, of course, in addition to his unfortunate tendency to make ridiculously broad generalizations and radically oversimplify complex social and moral issues.’
    • ‘By World War I their tactics and strategies linked the national to the local in a broad agenda for change.’
    • ‘This is the broad agenda for these projects and we hope to report on it in future independent and replicated studies.’
    • ‘The budget blueprint provides a broad outline of the administration's budget priorities, with details to be released in early April.’
    • ‘It also provides a broad timetable for the future availability of various systems.’
    • ‘However, most states today are not keen on a broad agenda for trade talks.’
    • ‘In formulating its position the labour movement adopted, initially, a broad agenda of change based on an incomes policy.’
    • ‘Though this is a broad generalisation and does not hold true for all companies it is evident with a great many.’
    • ‘It's a broad, sweeping generalization about a communication medium and an art form that has just as many good and bad things going for it as anything else.’
    • ‘The emphasis in this study is on the conceptualization of composing in the documents within the framework of this broad constitution of the subject English.’
    • ‘The mediums much prefer generalities, broad statements, and vague hints, all of which can be ‘interpreted’ generously.’
    • ‘Even the inclusion of the subjects of finance and technology is hardly significant for the developing countries as the work envisaged in these fields is of a very general and broad nature.’
    • ‘I stand by the comment as a broad generalisation, and I justify it on more than grounds of narrow personal prejudice.’
    general, non-specific, unspecific, unfocused, rough, approximate, overall, sweeping, basic, loose, indefinite, vague, hazy, fuzzy, woolly
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    1. 3.1 (of a hint) clear and unambiguous; not subtle.
      ‘a broad hint’
      • ‘Family history is a broad indicator of genetic variation associated with disease and may serve as a proxy for laboratory-based testing.’
      • ‘The way land speculation hit the private housing market gives us a broad hint of how personal spending power was reduced.’
      • ‘Well I'm not going to get into any kind of specificity about that other than a broad indication that it's not likely to take a long period of time.’
      • ‘However, Greenspan dropped broad hints that future cuts could be more modest.’
      • ‘From 1935 to the present, the U.S. census offers some broad indication of the rates of return migration during the southern exodus.’
      • ‘In his valedictory speech to the parliament, Cox stopped short of asking for the job of commission president, but dropped broad hints.’
      • ‘Ministers have dropped broad hints that this is when Labour will try to win a third term.’
      • ‘And he's even started dropping broad hints that he plans to stick around in Formula One, to stay with Ferrari until he's 40.’
      • ‘When it's starting to get late I drop broad hints about study and early mornings.’
      • ‘But Philip Ashdown, the school's chairman of governors dropped a broad hint that Mrs White would be reinstated as head of the school.’
      • ‘The last thing she needed right now was some inept matchmaking attempt or broad hint to Paul from her mother or sister.’
      • ‘Deleeuw suggests that Shakespeare seems to be making rather broad hints about the contradictory nature of the play in these initial scenes.’
      • ‘The band had started to drop broad hints to Tony Stock that he should be paying his unofficial assistants and that he would be denounced to the press as an exploiter if he didn't.’
      • ‘Hardly had he become Labour leader than Henry McLeish was dropping broad hints that he was going to review the government's line on Sutherland.’
      • ‘At the awards ceremony, Chris Cairns dropped a broad hint that he might not be retiring from Test cricket just yet, as had been suggested in the media.’
      • ‘They say they have been given a broad indication that the club wants to stay - but no deal has been struck yet.’
      • ‘This amounts to a grave accusation, but Bissell leaves it as just a broad hint.’
      • ‘I think the notion of a retrial is a broad hint to him to leave Egypt and go abroad, but so far he has been too stubborn and principled to take such hints.’
      • ‘If so, can you name the companies, languages, and give a broad indication of the price paid?’
      • ‘Marr professes - rather implausibly - not to be too aware of the issues, but gives a broad hint that he would be against the idea.’
      obvious, direct, plain, clear, unsubtle, explicit, straightforward, bald, clear-cut, manifest, patent, conspicuous, transparent, prominent, unmistakable, undisguised, unconcealed, overt, undeniable
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    2. 3.2 (of a phonetic transcription) showing only meaningful distinctions in sound and ignoring minor details.
      • ‘It is the kind used in pronouncing dictionaries, and is referred to informally as broad transcription.’
      • ‘A broad transcription would also need to note the difference, because the two words mean different things.’
      • ‘The goal of a broad transcription is to record the phonemes that a speaker uses rather than the actual spoken variants of those phonemes that are produced.’
  • 4Somewhat coarse and indecent.

    ‘what we regard as broad or even bawdy is a fact of nature to him’
    • ‘Whatever it was, it was broad and very unrefined.’
    • ‘Northern Broadsides are experts at celebrating the broad humour present in all Shakespeare's plays, with some outstanding performances and impeccable comic timing.’
    • ‘Some of the humour may be too broad for more sophisticated audiences, but overall this is a charming way to spend a couple of hours.’
    • ‘He was proud, he said, to come from Kent, ‘where I doubt not is spoken as broad and rude English as is in any place of England’.’
    • ‘The humour is broad and robust, but underneath the comedy is delicately balanced with pathos.’
    indecent, improper, coarse, unrefined, indelicate, ribald, risqué, racy, rude, spicy, suggestive, naughty, indecorous, off colour, earthy, smutty, dirty, filthy, vulgar, gross
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  • 5(of a regional accent) very noticeable and strong.

    ‘his broad Bronx accent’
    • ‘It was only the following Monday that my manager put his head round the door, and in his broad Dublin accent said just one sentence to me.’
    • ‘I developed a broad New Zealand accent to annoy my 4th form speech teacher and now I can't get rid of it.’
    • ‘It's an intriguing partnership because Timson sounds very humorous, talks in a broad Lancashire accent and swears like a trooper.’
    • ‘My father was a bit cross about my accent being too broad - my brothers and sisters were all nicely spoken - and he tried to stop it.’
    • ‘He didn't fit the usual rock-star template, after all: he wasn't tall or macho and he didn't disguise his broad North London accent when he sang.’
    • ‘I don't know why I don't have a broad Lancashire accent.’
    • ‘Mr Golding is fascinated by the stories surrounding the making of Kes, including the withdrawal of American backing because executives could not understand the broad Barnsley accents.’
    • ‘Neighbours say there were no signs that the man they knew as Yacoub was anything other than a strict and decent Muslim, albeit with a broad Dundee accent.’
    • ‘A central strength in the production is that the local broad regional accent has been used to fine effect throughout, thus giving it an earthy and authentic ‘feel’.’
    • ‘You can see this sense of place in the parts she has played, a largely working-class roster of roles that allows her to keep her broad accent, an accent she says she never wants to lose.’
    • ‘‘But I've been doing it that long, you don't notice,’ he says in a broad Wearside accent.’
    • ‘Many in the Asian community are born and bred in Keighley and have broad West Yorkshire accents; others have been there for 30 or 40 years.’
    • ‘‘I'm only messing,’ giggles Melanie Brown in her broad Leeds accent, collapsing back into a spinny chair.’
    • ‘But could southerners understand their broad Yorkshire accents?’
    • ‘Shepherd quotes the workmen's broad Edinburgh accents as if ancient Aramaic, finding one worker who touchingly gave up work elsewhere so that he could play his part in the creation of the new parliament.’
    • ‘When Bradfordian Hasan Jamal visited a small village in Pakistan the last thing he expected to hear was a broad Yorkshire accent.’
    • ‘He has the pale, pasty set of the sedentary, a fleshy padding of indulgence and a deep, broad accent with an odd similarity to that of Charles Kennedy.’
    • ‘Sir Walter Raleigh kept his broad Devonshire accent all his life, to the point where people used to complain that the Swisser-Swatter was almost incomprehensible in the east of England.’
    • ‘A second-generation Syrian American in his fifties and the son of a car factory worker, he speaks in a broad Midwest accent and wears not robes or a long beard but a blue suit, shirt and tie.’
    • ‘The high point of my trip to New Zealand this Christmas came when I met and embraced a little grey-haired lady with a broad Kiwi accent at her home in Lower Hutt, a suburb of Wellington, in the North Island.’
    noticeable, strong, thick, heavy, pronounced
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noun

North American
informal
  • A woman.

    • ‘These women are tough broads indeed, which makes the doc seem cold for a while.’
    • ‘I keep forgetting broads don't like it when you call them chicks.’
    • ‘Those broads thought ‘nice’ was nothing more than a place in the south of France to go and get a suntan.’
    • ‘He said, and with that heavy accent, it was a good way to meet broads.’
    • ‘Honey - we may be crazy old broads, but we're not dead.’
    • ‘What we should not overlook, of course, is that some of Hollywood's most famous female stars were not buxom broads.’
    • ‘Jeff, these broads have transformed that dive into a legit cabaret.’
    • ‘But this is a good show that not only evokes Merman's artistry, but also reminds us that she helped transform Broadway leading ladies from demure innocents to tough and knowing broads.’
    • ‘As crazy as it sounds, it's entirely realistic to believe that some of our soldiers stationed abroad might be broads with breast cancer.’
    • ‘Apparently he had a bevy of broads from the Bronx caring for him, and, in fact, it seemed as though his apartment had become somewhat of a community center.’
    • ‘I still intend to get that film before the group as a tour de force of big-shouldered broads gloriously over-acting.’
    • ‘Her strong, independent characters have more in common with the sassy broads of 1940s and 1950s Hollywood than the insipid, passive roles generally meted out to today's luckless ingénues.’
    • ‘Man, let me tell you, they don't make broads like that any more.’
    • ‘I asked the bartender (who I started referring to as ‘Greg’ because he looked like a Greg even though his name tag said ‘Stan’) where all the broads were and he just started laughing.’
    • ‘We listen to tough old broad Elaine Stritch belt out a song about tough old broads.’
    • ‘Doonan sees these provocateurs not as a bunch of kooky broads but as important representatives of the evolution of women's culture.’
    • ‘Food is an ingredient of nearly all mobster movies, as essential as bullets or broads.’
    • ‘I used to think that women were the salvation of humanity, that if only they let the broads take over for a while the world would start heading in a better, more civilized direction.’
    • ‘The group has plodded along for more than a decade, balancing ‘real jobs’ with a nice dose of touring, beer, broads, beer… did I mention beer?’
    • ‘I didn't anticipate the broads to be so pleasing to the eye is all.’
    lady, girl, member of the fair sex, member of the gentle sex, female
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Phrases

  • broad in the beam

    • informal Fat around the hips.

      • ‘What struck me was that these guys were all well-dressed in suits and that they were all big fellas, not nearly as tall as I am but all real hefty and broad in the beam.’
      • ‘Presumably she was a bit long in the tooth and a bit broad in the beam for evening television.’
      • ‘It would have to be first class because she's a bit broad in the beam.’
      • ‘Wandering Forbidden Planet, I find myself part of a crowd of scruffy, myopic thirtysomething white boys who've grown a bit broad in the beam from too much sitting and snacking.’
      • ‘Hartson may look a bit broad in the beam, but his strength and experience will give big problems to defenders in the Championship.’
      • ‘Morweena was forced to slide a little, because the woman was broad in the beam.’
      big, burly, heavy, tall, bulky, thickset, heavyset, chunky, strapping, powerfully built, hefty, muscular, muscle-bound, brawny, muscly, husky, solid, powerful, sturdy, solidly built, broad-shouldered, strong, big and strong, rugged, herculean
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  • in broad daylight

    • During the day, when it is light, and surprising or unexpected for this reason.

      ‘the kidnapping took place in broad daylight’
      • ‘They're in every evening and weekend in broad daylight where people can seem them.’
      • ‘It was entirely unprovoked and it took place in broad daylight.’
      • ‘Most of the burglaries took place during the daytime in broad daylight.’
      • ‘It has not helped that bank robberies have been carried out mere yards from a city police station in broad daylight.’
      • ‘How had McWilliams managed to get across a roof and drop down into the yard of a loyalist wing, in broad daylight, without being seen?’
      • ‘Tuesday's early-morning attack was the eighth committed in a public place in broad daylight.’
      • ‘People say they were surprised because it was in broad daylight.’
      • ‘Criminals should not be allowed to commit crimes with impunity in broad daylight.’
      • ‘Staff believe the culprits must have taken the flowers in broad daylight.’
      • ‘Also remarkable is leaving the theater at about eleven thirty in broad daylight.’
      • ‘It took thieves less than 15 minutes to steal the goods in broad daylight on a Saturday afternoon.’
      • ‘It happened in broad daylight on a busy intersection in Makati, Manila's business district.’
      • ‘Some months ago I witnessed a similar incident at the same roundabout, this time in broad daylight.’
      • ‘It's not like it was in a dark alley at night, it was in broad daylight.’
      • ‘An 18-year-old woman had her handbag and lunch snatched from her as she walked to work in broad daylight.’
      • ‘I recently witnessed another heist pulled off in broad daylight by our local law enforcement.’
      • ‘A banned motorist who tried to flee from police through residential areas in Keighley during broad daylight has been jailed for a total of 15 months.’
      • ‘There are people who steal flowers in broad daylight from the flower beds.’
      • ‘Last week a few miles outside Lucknow robbers stopped the traffic and began robbing passers-by in broad daylight.’
      • ‘After all, she chased Dorothy and the lads around in broad daylight for nearly 90 minutes.’
      full, complete, total, clear, bright, plain, undiminished
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Origin

Old English brād, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch breed and German breit.

Pronunciation

broad

/brôd//brɔd/