Main definitions of bridge in US English:

: bridge1bridge2

bridge1

noun

  • 1A structure carrying a road, path, railroad, or canal across a river, ravine, road, railroad, or other obstacle.

    ‘a bridge across the river’
    ‘a railroad bridge’
    • ‘The bridge crosses the Panjir River and will be a conduit between Parwan and Kapisa provinces.’
    • ‘A much used early metal girder bridge was the Waitaki River road and rail bridge.’
    • ‘They're working on one of the bridges across the river, so the traffic is ridiculous.’
    • ‘He'd be better off in a coastal battery or at the head of a militia regiment that guards railway bridges.’
    • ‘In this, the last of the great British railway bridges, mild steel superseded wrought iron.’
    • ‘That was followed by increased protection for nuclear power plants, bridges and railways.’
    • ‘The main road bridge across the Clarence River was washed away and access was only by punt across the river.’
    • ‘It brought with it hospitals, schools, land reclamation, roads, bridges and eventually, ports and railways.’
    • ‘The lonely wanderer followed the terrace path eastwards and quickly crossed the old bridge over the River Burien.’
    • ‘Not too far ahead was the first of the bridges across the river.’
    • ‘Around the district railway and traffic bridges were washed away or damaged, cutting off the district.’
    • ‘A crowd started for the Nevsky, crossing the frozen river to avoid the police on the river bridges.’
    • ‘Of course, many a country is sensitive about having its airports, railway stations and bridges photographed.’
    • ‘The card is an old picture of what appears to be a Roman aqueduct - a bridge over a river.’
    • ‘Thick wooden pillars extended from the bottom of the bridge to the river base, holding it steadily.’
    • ‘Fallen trees, artillery, earthworks, and burned bridges blocked the paths into the city.’
    • ‘Thousands of miles of major roads and railways and hundreds of bridges were destroyed.’
    • ‘The Senate sent a second army to hold the bridges at the Rhone River.’
    • ‘I could see him striding across the wasteland to the Lochee Road towards the railway bridge at Muirton Road.’
    • ‘The Trail threads through Langport and returns to the river under the railway bridge.’
    viaduct, aqueduct, flyover, overpass
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Something that is intended to reconcile or form a connection between two things.
      ‘a committee that was formed to create a bridge between rival parties’
      • ‘Such cases constitute a bridge between Chapters 12 and 13.’
      • ‘And we're not being an adequate bridge between these two levels of audiences.’
      • ‘Ida likens the NFC to a bridge between the two worlds.’
      • ‘Ideally, I want to be a bridge between Eastern and Western cultures.’
      • ‘This need not invalidate the argument for a continuing bridge between cultures.’
      • ‘Their books offer a bridge between their kitchens and yours.’
      • ‘This has made me appreciate the positive force of school as a bridge between home and society-at-large.’
      • ‘I think it is kind of the bridge between last century and this century.’
      • ‘She is very much a bridge between the old and the new, and very valuable for that reason.’
      • ‘It's the bridge between adolescent rage and post-high school, a newly minted adult disillusionment.’
      • ‘At this point in history, Turkey has a special role as the bridge between Europe and Asia.’
      • ‘It is a bridge between moments of vision and should not be mistaken for vision itself.’
      • ‘Turkey has long tried to enter the expanding union, seeing itself as a bridge between Muslim countries and Europe.’
      • ‘Turkish Baptists, to a certain extent, have been a bridge between Baptists in the Middle East and Europe.’
      • ‘Here is the bridge between the young girl and her fantasy adult.’
      • ‘This is really the perfect ‘mid-CD’ song, like the bridge between act one and act two.’
      • ‘However, the outcome is one that makes less of a bridge between that sequestered domain and the outer world.’
      • ‘No more can he claim to be the bridge between the U.S. and the E.U.’
      • ‘The work establishes the bridge between modernism and post-modernism utilizing primitive oral techniques.’
      • ‘What is missing is the bridge between the corporate knowledge of the previous deployment cycle and the next.’
      link, connection, means of uniting
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2
      short for land bridge
  • 2The elevated, enclosed platform on a ship from which the captain and officers direct operations.

    • ‘Now he sat in the small bridge of the ship, recording daily reports and readings from the diagnostics systems.’
    • ‘They hastily crept through the halls, towards the bridge of the ship.’
    • ‘Without question, all officers stationed on the bridge of the ship marched towards the fire control center.’
    • ‘There is also a night-time color scheme because the bridge of a ship is in darkened mode.’
    • ‘About two hours ago, the junior officers were called to the bridge to conduct ship handling drills.’
    • ‘Fire as many as you need to destroy the bridge of their ship.’
    • ‘The new systems will be fitted to the bridges and operations rooms of Navy warships for the electronic planning, monitoring and recording of voyages.’
    • ‘Rapidly, the pirates spread through the ship, securing the bridge, and engineering.’
    • ‘Once embarked, the team dispersed aft, below decks and to the bridge to swiftly gain control of the vessel.’
    • ‘The captain left the bridge and took the nearest elevator to deck three.’
    • ‘The bomber scored a direct hit on the bridge area, but it did not render the ship unseaworthy.’
    • ‘He left his quarters and moved to the bridge of his ship, but it was vacant.’
    • ‘The screen shifted, and the bridge of another ship appeared.’
    • ‘The bridge of the ship is bustling with activity.’
    • ‘He made his way to the bridge and saw the Captain sitting in his elevated command chair.’
    • ‘Personnel will then proceed to the bridge and engine room to take control of, and assess the condition of, the ship.’
    • ‘The captain ordered the bridge to keep the ship on its course but increase the ship speed by ten percent.’
    • ‘With Illeen's direction from the bridge of the ship, the troops spread out and began preparations to raise the vessel.’
    • ‘The torpedo detonated beneath the bridge, breaking the ship's back and splitting her in half.’
    • ‘On the command ship the bridge was in a tremendous upheaval.’
  • 3The upper bony part of a person's nose.

    ‘he pushed his spectacles further up the bridge of his nose’
    • ‘Highlighters are usually applied to cheekbones, the bridge of the nose and brow bones to bring out bone structure.’
    • ‘Clean the eye from the bridge of the nose to the outer eye.’
    • ‘She rubbed her eyes, then the bridge of her nose with her index finger and thumb.’
    • ‘I glide along her eyebrows and follow the bridge of her nose to her cheekbones.’
    • ‘By setting the figure forward, Napoleon's forehead casts shadows over his eyes and the bridge of his nose.’
    • ‘Generally, the head is large, the forehead is prominent and the nose is flat at the bridge.’
    • ‘The metallic strip at the nose should be contoured to fit the bridge of the nose.’
    • ‘Others suggest an ice pack over the bridge of the nose.’
    • ‘Apply to cheekbones, the bridge of the nose and a dab in the tear duct.’
    • ‘A few dots of gel blush on your cheekbones and the bridge of your nose will give you a lit-from-within glow.’
    • ‘Physical findings included a slightly prominent forehead with a depressed wide nasal bridge and a flat nose.’
    • ‘I tipped my head back until the bridge of my nose was pressed firmly against his neck, then let out a long breath.’
    • ‘I duck into the living room just in time to see his large hand rubbing the bridge of his nose, and his eyes are closed.’
    • ‘He scoffed in what was considered a manly scoff and placed his fingers back to the bridge of his nose.’
    • ‘Mr. Danielson hunched his eyebrows down towards the bridge of his nose as he thought.’
    • ‘In he came, cupping his bleeding nose in one hand as he gripped the bridge of the nose with the other.’
    • ‘The smaller ethmoid sinuses are behind the bridge of the nose, between the eyes.’
    • ‘In the Weber test, the tuning fork is struck and placed on the midline of the forehead, the nasal bridge, or the chin.’
    • ‘He had a gold earring in his right ear, and a tiny scar across the bridge of his nose.’
    • ‘It was my turn to reacquaint my eyebrows with the bridge of my nose.’
    1. 3.1 The central part of a pair of glasses, fitting over the bridge of the nose.
      ‘these sunglasses have a special nose bridge for comfort’
      • ‘She pushed the bridge of her glasses further up on her nose.’
      • ‘Men with small button noses should opt for metal framed glasses with high bridges.’
      • ‘The key to well fitting comfortable glasses is the bridge of the frames.’
      • ‘An inflated bridge piece is provided for use on eyeglass frames to increase comfort.’
  • 4A partial denture supported by natural teeth on either side.

    See also bridgework
    • ‘Crowns, bridges, and orthodontics are available after only 12 months of continuous enrollment.’
    • ‘Implants can be used singly, to support a crown, or in groups to stabilise dentures or bridges.’
    • ‘The two incidents brought a plea from the dentist and his colleagues for people to monitor their dentures and bridges.’
    • ‘A temporary bridge can be made so that you cannot see the spaces between the remaining teeth.’
    • ‘Dentures and bridges that are supported by successful implants tend to be very secure.’
  • 5Music
    The part of a string instrument over which the strings are stretched.

    • ‘How can he make sounds which are patently musical below the instrument's bridge, for example?’
    • ‘Tom picks the strings from behind the bridge to give an amazing effect on the song.’
    • ‘Popular instruments include the zither with 25 strings and movable bridges.’
    • ‘Depressing the string behind the bridge gives great flexibility of pitch.’
    • ‘I pointed at the spot between the sound hole and bridge, where this instrument had its fullest sound.’
  • 6Music
    A bridge passage or middle eight.

    • ‘They write choruses and bridges and songs that last longer than a minute and a half.’
    • ‘Pianist Eddie Heywood deftly fingers the bridge on the last chorus.’
    • ‘Strings add color, providing the staccato rhythms of the bridge.’
    • ‘The verses, bridges, and choruses of the originals don't always remain intact.’
    • ‘The process continued until verses, choruses and bridges were written, along with some lyrics.’
    • ‘The dropping of a simplistic synth line in the bridge and eventual chorus only sweetens the deal.’
  • 7The support formed by the hand for the forward part of a billiard cue.

    • ‘I have been playing pool for almost 5 years and since I have started I have been using an open bridge.’
    • ‘The user then places a hand on the billiard table to form a bridge for the cue.’
    1. 7.1 A long stick with a frame at the end that is used to support a cue for a shot that is otherwise hard to reach.
      • ‘The front hand holds the mechanical bridge flat on the table.’
      • ‘Lay the bridge on the table with the notch of desired height behind the cue ball.’
      • ‘It slides onto your cue, eliminating the need for a separate bridge.’
  • 8An electric circuit with two branches across which a detector or load is connected, used to measure resistance or other property by equalizing the potential across the two ends of a detector, or to rectify an alternating voltage or current.

    • ‘The gas detection circuit includes a catalytic bridge circuit and an analyzing bridge circuit.’
    • ‘A high sensitivity detector system utilizing a bridge balancing method is described.’
    • ‘It took me many tries to get the grease to seemingly connect the bridges without touching the other connections.’
    • ‘The internal harnesses comprise unlabeled black wires terminated at the bridge rectifiers and filter caps.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Be a bridge over (something)

    ‘a covered walkway that bridged the gardens’
    • ‘Significant for bridging the two riverbanks of unequal height, its light steel structure has a delicate lace-like detail.’
    • ‘Lift and stair are provided, leading to the curved walkway above, which bridges the road.’
    • ‘They were engaged in trying to build a dyke to bridge the river, but the Egyptians managed to thwart that.’
    • ‘Ties were also found covered with mortar bridging the cavity.’
    span, cross, cross over, go over, pass over, extend across, reach across, traverse, arch over
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Build a bridge over (something)
      ‘earlier attempts to bridge the channel had failed’
      • ‘Spend some time to be sure that you haven't inadvertently bridged to the adjacent pads with excess solder.’
      • ‘How can a device company and its overseas manufacturer bridge the physical distance built into their relationship?’
      • ‘Attempts at bridging through the wall to anything outside resulted only in jumbled, distorted messages.’
      • ‘If the fabric is bridged to a Fibre Channel, the commands are transparently converted in the router.’
    2. 1.2 Make (a difference between two groups) smaller or less significant.
      ‘bridging the gap between avant garde art and popular culture’
      • ‘At a grassroots level, this is a great step towards bridging the gap of knowledge.’
      • ‘Enhancing style and expressing individualism is another reason why shoes have bridged the gap between the sexes.’
      • ‘A lot of Deaf people are today going into the mainstream, so sign-singing is a good way of bridging the gap.’
      • ‘My general point is that the attempt to bridge that gap should be a necessary condition for all philosophizing.’
      • ‘This article has attempted to show how the gap between educational theory and practice can be bridged.’
      • ‘The theory of empirical ethics attempts to bridge this gap.’
      • ‘Race, class, culture and geographic divides are bridged by both laughter and fearless treading on touchy subjects.’
      • ‘The gap was bridged, and that was the genesis of my love of acting.’
      • ‘A new psychology initiative helps communities bridge racial and cultural differences.’
      • ‘Differences on key issues could not be bridged.’
      • ‘‘I saw a need and decided to bridge the generation gap,’ she said.’
      • ‘It was not bridging the gulf that has grown between Europe and the U.S. since the end of the Cold War.’
      • ‘Revisit the sound that lifted our spirits and bridged the gap between bubblegum pop and adult-oriented rock.’
      • ‘It's about bridging the gap between the genres.’
      • ‘The tour attempts to bridge gaps between college students and the native communities that exist very close to them.’
      • ‘Borderlines vanish in this crossover event, which joins two genres of music bridging a three hundred year gulf.’
      • ‘The gap should also be bridged between heads of departments and principals.’
      • ‘Their authentic sound bridges the gap between the Jamaican countryside and downtown Montreal.’
      • ‘‘I think he was one of the last people who bridged the gap between the old guys and the new guys’.’
      • ‘The World Asthma Day is an attempt to bridge the gap between the patient and physician.’
      join, link, connect, unite
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • a bridge too far

    • 1A step or act that is regarded as being too drastic to take.

      ‘having Botox would be a bridge too far’
      • ‘But with 46 consulates in the United States - Canada has just 20-critics say Mexico is building a bridge too far.’
      • ‘That may be a bridge too far in US politics.’
      • ‘Apparently, this group was a bridge too far even for them.’
      • ‘However, Arnhem proved to be a bridge too far, immortalised in the film of the same name.’
      • ‘Many times, he told me, reformers rejected a compromise as a bridge too far.’
      • ‘This could be a bridge too far, even in South Korea.’
      • ‘Threatening physical violence against the host is a bridge too far, it would seem.’
      • ‘Community, whether caustic or politely consensual, has an odd knack of seeming a bridge too far.’
      • ‘But the burqa is, in my opinion, a bridge too far.’
      • ‘Of course, for some, that one small step was a bridge too far.’
      1. 1.1Something that is very difficult to achieve.
        ‘that second goal proved a bridge too far’
        • ‘That, I suspect, is a bridge too far for the foreseeable future.’
        • ‘This could easily be a bridge too far for a team currently very much in transition.’
        • ‘The Kyoto Protocol is a bridge too far.’
        • ‘Quite simply last Sunday was a bridge too far without these players on board.’
        • ‘For others, alas, it clearly remains a bridge too far.’
        • ‘Furthermore, its demand that the states give up their formal sovereignty is still "a bridge too far."’
        • ‘Club fought on valiantly in the second half, but the missing man was always going to prove a bridge too far.’
        • ‘Joyce had little support and an even poorer supply of ball and staging a one-man comeback was a bridge too far for him.’
        • ‘In that sense the application was a bridge too far.’
        • ‘Clearly, that will be a bridge too far for the Kiwi batsmen.’
  • cross that bridge when one comes to it

    • Deal with a problem when and if it arises.

      • ‘I could just say quit your worrying and cross that bridge when you come to it.’
      • ‘Waiting to cross that bridge when you come to it could be disastrous.’
      • ‘You'll need to repave it every few years, but I guess you'll cross that bridge when you come to it.’
      • ‘In any case, you'll cross that bridge when you come to it, if you need to.’
      • ‘If they later raise rates and institutions balk, cross that bridge when you come to it.’
  • I have a bridge to sell you

    • Used to indicate that a particular statement or claim could only be believed by someone who is very gullible.

      ‘if you think that he will make things better, then I have a bridge to sell you’

Origin

Old English brycg (noun), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch brug and German Brücke.

Pronunciation

bridge

/brɪdʒ//brij/

Main definitions of bridge in US English:

: bridge1bridge2

bridge2

noun

  • A card game descended from whist, played by two partnerships of two players who at the beginning of each hand bid for the right to name the trump suit, the highest bid also representing a contract to make a specified number of tricks with a specified suit as trumps.

    • ‘He described the American Navy as a club for golfers and bridge players.’
    • ‘This is possible because of the trumping rule, which is different from that in whist or bridge.’
    • ‘I learned this game from our interpreter, in exchange for teaching him bridge.’
    • ‘He became one of the world's best bridge players, with a raft of teaching videos and CDs to his name.’
    • ‘If you like trick-taking card games like hearts and bridge, a treasure awaits you in Mü and More.’
    • ‘He was always a keen golfer and bridge player.’
    • ‘So instead, we played bridge and piquet the whole morning.’
    • ‘There are no known performance-enhancing drugs for bridge.’
    • ‘In his youth he was a keen tennis and bridge player; latterly his pride was his garden.’
    • ‘He was an active and knowledgeable gardener and he remained a highly competitive bridge player.’
    • ‘She worried that her standing - as a player who takes her bridge very seriously - might be diminished.’
    • ‘Large numbers of bridge fans attend national tournaments featuring the top players.’
    • ‘Later she became an enthusiastic and ruthless bridge player.’
    • ‘The games can be doubled and redoubled as in bridge.’
    • ‘Outside medicine he became a first division bridge player, learnt to speak Spanish, and played golf and tennis.’
    • ‘Other popular leisure-time pursuits include chess, bingo, and bridge.’
    • ‘Even before then, variants of it were popular with bridge players in Denmark and Southern Sweden.’
    • ‘He was known as a more than competent bridge player in the European Parliament.’
    • ‘No offence to any bridge players out there, but they've got to be kidding me.’
    • ‘When I did see the odd fellow bridge player, the first thing I asked them was if they had seen William.’

Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

bridge

/brɪdʒ//brij/