Definition of breed in US English:

breed

verbbred

  • 1no object (of animals) mate and then produce offspring.

    ‘toads are said to return to the pond of their birth to breed’
    ‘the breeding season’
    • ‘Flies can breed in infected faeces and contaminate food.’
    • ‘These birds breed primarily on coastal beaches from southern Washington to southern Baja California, Mexico.’
    • ‘Now that does seem like a lot, but these birds breed at an incredibly slow rate, with an incredibly low rate of juvenile success.’
    • ‘Keep manure dry, since wet manure promotes fly pest breeding and inhibits beneficial insect breeding.’
    • ‘There are, he says, at least 200 different species of bacteria breeding feverishly behind your lips.’
    • ‘Birds might breed there, but in fact the reproduction success is not high enough to maintain the population.’
    • ‘One should also remember that cattle breed once per year, or sometimes not at all.’
    • ‘The tiger breeds very easily, even in captivity.’
    • ‘At remote Point Bennett on San Miguel, seals and sea lions breed and pup in spectacular numbers.’
    • ‘The current roster has more than 50 stallions breeding on five continents.’
    • ‘Did you know men cows will never breed with the same cow twice.’
    • ‘A captive pair of wounded, flightless eagles had bred and produced an egg, something that almost never happens.’
    • ‘California red-legged frogs breed in aquatic habitats such as streams, ponds, marshes, and stock ponds.’
    • ‘And they also believe that the creatures are breeding in our countryside.’
    • ‘Larvae breed in woodland pools filled by melting snows or by spring rains.’
    • ‘Bored pet owners released them and the birds bred.’
    • ‘Some Australian bird species or parrot species will breed quite happily here in captivity.’
    • ‘But can so much really rest on the fortunes of 58 species of butterfly breeding in Britain?’
    • ‘One thing he had not been able to figure out was how the creatures bred.’
    • ‘If the predator breeds faster than the prey, eventually the predators run out of food and starve.’
    reproduce, produce offspring, procreate, bear young, multiply, propagate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Cause (an animal) to produce offspring, especially in a controlled and organized way.
      ‘he wants to see the animals his new stock has been bred from’
      • ‘He added, looking down at the mare, ‘She is about four years old, and this Spring should be bred for the first time.’’
      • ‘I noticed the horse was bred in the palace as it was the pure white colour only royal horses had.’
      • ‘These little tiny innocent mice were bred at my facility for generation studies in some experiments.’
      • ‘Researchers planned to breed the chickens and study their offspring.’
      • ‘For to breed the dog would be to cause a worse-off rather than a better-off individual to exist.’
      • ‘Researchers bred mice and monitored their offspring for DNA mutations passed through the sperm of the father.’
      • ‘Hereford sires were bred to Angus and MARC III cows.’
      • ‘He was bred between the strongest and fastest horses of the desert.’
      • ‘Cows were bred to Brangus bulls during the 60-d breeding season, with 1 bull per 18 cows.’
      • ‘Andre says her next steps are to try to breed the species and eventually release some back into the wild.’
      • ‘Cows are bred, calves are produced and animals are sold off the farm.’
      • ‘Most farmers breed pigs, sheep, and dairy cattle, from which they obtain meat, wool, milk, cheese, and butter.’
      • ‘You can also breed your dogs, and either keep them or sell the puppies to your friends via link up.’
      • ‘He had the burnished-copper eye color that she had been seeking, so she bred him to one of her best Burmese females.’
      • ‘Mules, animals that result from breeding a male donkey with a female horse, are usually sterile.’
      • ‘If she is bred, I won't be able to ride her for quite some time.’
      • ‘They also told him that they were breeding Bride in Blue to Seattle Slew.’
      • ‘One does not need Stonehenge to know when to plant seeds or when to breed cattle.’
      • ‘In the spring, she had plans to breed him with Snow.’
      • ‘The dog was bred to another one of the dogs on his farm.’
    2. 1.2with object Develop (a kind of animal or plant) for a particular purpose or quality.
      ‘these horses are bred for this sport’
      • ‘One would expect the Chinook, which was bred for function, not form, to be free of genetic disease.’
      • ‘Thus, the sheepdogs developed for use on the islands were bred for agility, brains and speed.’
      • ‘The cattle were bred for endurance, the method deemed best for inducing marbling.’
      • ‘One of the oldest breeds, the lizard canary, is bred for the spangled effect of its feathers.’
      • ‘They are bred for power, speediness, and stamina though height somehow made itself known within their pedigree.’
      • ‘Most leeks can be harvested for use as baby leeks, but some varieties are bred for culinary appeal as baby leeks.’
      • ‘The best kind of bees is the bumble bee, which are bred for their speed and noise.’
      • ‘Being bred for companionship they need it as well.’
      • ‘It follows that if you want an authentic border collie, you must get one that was bred for livestock work.’
      • ‘Commonly, these also had a snake nursery where snakes were bred for use for the healing ceremonies.’
      • ‘Many seed catalogs feature varieties that are bred for small size plots - and organic too!’
      • ‘Dumb and silent, they are bred for domestic tasks or field work.’
      • ‘All commercial potato varieties grown in North America are bred for low levels of solanine.’
      • ‘She could try to outrun them, but their horses were bred for endurance in this desert land.’
      • ‘Hybrid seeds, on the other hand, are bred for qualities such as longevity or disease resistance.’
      • ‘Dachshunds were originally bred to go down badger holes and kill badgers.’
      • ‘The horses this elite group invested in were bred for beauty, intelligence, strength, and speed.’
      • ‘Dogs are bred for profit only, and there is virtually no concern for the health or emotional well-being of these animals.’
      • ‘To make the process more precise, plant varieties are often bred to express a limited range of traits.’
      • ‘Those currently being used were bred for forage production.’
      rear, raise, nurture
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3with object Rear and train (someone) to behave in a particular way or have certain qualities.
      ‘Theresa had been beautifully bred’
      • ‘There's just something about that part of the country that just breeds crazy daredevils.’
      • ‘Our capabilities to learn are boundless but not every person is bred to be a goody-goody.’
      • ‘In this increasingly technological world, we must breed scientists, not just engineers; thinkers, not just doers.’
      • ‘Seems like the better bred you are, the more of a jerk you turn out to be.’
      • ‘I brought you up and bred you and this is how you repay me?’
      • ‘They breed their grannies tough out there in Lithuania, make no mistake.’
      • ‘These types of cases breed other cases, breed other victims.’
      • ‘One of your skills as a coach is to breed these personalities, not as individuals, but how they interact in a group.’
      • ‘She knew she really shouldn't be taking it out on him, after all this was his job and what he was practically bred to do.’
      • ‘Grandfather looked at me in anger, not so much at me, but in the world that bred us to be enemies for no reason.’
      • ‘She's from the West Coast, and they breed strong women down there.’
      • ‘If we were to breed you for hosts, how could we keep you knowledgeable, but subservient?’
      • ‘Her Mom had bred her for Justine when she was two years old.’
      • ‘She breeds dancers whose execution is invariably clean and gentle - a dream of lyricism.’
      • ‘It's like stereotypical teenager stuff that she's practically bred to say.’
      • ‘They saw themselves as well-born and bred men who out of loyalty and conscience had chosen to defend their king.’
      • ‘For all their vaunted intelligence and breeding people enjoy their symbols and they like to gloat.’
      • ‘They own us, and breed us, and take the fruits of our labor.’
      • ‘One cannot but feel that the prison system breeds criminals instead of rehabilitating them.’
      • ‘In India, IT is not just breeding billionaires and Internet addicts.’
      bring up, rear, raise, nurture
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4with object Cause (something) to happen or occur, typically over a period of time.
      ‘success breeds confidence’
      • ‘This is not a track record that breeds confidence.’
      • ‘Success breeds success and the entire animation category needs a boost these days.’
      • ‘In television, more than any other business, success breeds imitation.’
      • ‘Openness means equality; it breeds fairness which results in strength.’
      • ‘As she saw it, even occasional laziness breeds disaster.’
      • ‘It breeds resentment, and often leads to increased violence and serious abuse.’
      • ‘Or could it be that beauty breeds fame and success?’
      • ‘Effective communication in the employee-supervisor relationship breeds trust and better understanding.’
      • ‘When addressing creativity, the general rule is quantity breeds quality!’
      • ‘Our local practices breed complacency and led us to take shortcuts.’
      • ‘Such experience bred self-reliance and general hardiness among the settlers.’
      • ‘It breeds an atmosphere of competition which has, over time, become hostility.’
      • ‘Put very crudely, familiarity and success bred scepticism and contempt.’
      • ‘Naturally, I concluded that athletic success bred confidence that carries through into professional life.’
      • ‘In fact, ‘success’ has similarly bred disaster.’
      • ‘Usually, success breeds envy and resentment, but we've stayed good friends.’
      • ‘And so in a sense success breeds its own failure.’
      • ‘What are the general factors that breed terrorism?’
      • ‘As you mentioned, success breeds competition.’
      • ‘Collusion in under-age drinking starts at home and adult abuse breeds imitation’.’
      cause, bring about, give rise to, lead to, create, produce, generate, spawn, foster, occasion, make for, result in
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5Physics with object Create (fissile material) by nuclear reaction.
      • ‘Only small fractions of these fertile elements are needed for clandestine breeding of fissionable fuels.’
      • ‘The breeding reactor is included in the cooling circuit with a lower coolant temperature.’
      • ‘The reactor was designed for breeding plutonium and can readily be converted to do so.’

noun

  • 1A stock of animals or plants within a species having a distinctive appearance and typically having been developed by deliberate selection.

    • ‘Each steer within a breed group was randomly assigned a number between one and four.’
    • ‘Rankings for purebred producers are useful within respective breeds.’
    • ‘He wrestles crocodiles and captures all breeds of dangerous animals for a living.’
    • ‘The quantity and quality of fats in traditional animal breeds varies, too.’
    • ‘The origin of the Maltese as a distinct breed has never been precisely determined.’
    • ‘Once you decide which breed you'd like to raise, what kind of facilities will you need?’
    • ‘We talked about the breed species and of its culture.’
    • ‘I would point out that we have special breeds of animals that we bred for hundreds of years.’
    • ‘These values enhance the accuracy of selection decisions by establishing the relative genetic value of a sire within a breed.’
    • ‘They went to great lengths to find the most powerful of each animal breed, and take a fang from their mouths.’
    • ‘Even so, some dogs within these breeds bark more than they should, some more than others.’
    • ‘In the section for cattle, about 600 stud animals of 15 different breeds and 16 slaughter steers have been entered.’
    • ‘As someone who supports rare breeds and animal welfare, I'll have to side with PETA on this one.’
    • ‘It's one way of keeping yourself up-to-date on what's happening, especially with a plant breed.’
    • ‘Most calves in Britain are cross-breds with blood from both native and continental breeds.’
    • ‘Furthermore, since humans have been in New Zealand, many breeds of native flora and fauna have become extinct.’
    • ‘This should also be true of cattle within the same breed.’
    • ‘Regardless of what breed you choose, or where it comes from, ALL dogs need training.’
    • ‘Once you decide which breed you want, you will need to consider the age of the dog.’
    • ‘This text would be very applicable for an introductory course in animal breeds, selection, evaluation and judging.’
    variety, stock, strain, line, family
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sort or kind of person or thing.
      ‘a new breed of entrepreneurs was brought into being’
      • ‘But it just goes to show you what sort of breed of people lived in our wee town.’
      • ‘Make no mistake; modern CEOs are generally an outstanding breed.’
      • ‘Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurs are still a rare breed in both countries.’
      • ‘The wine of interest to this new breed of wine merchant typically sits in an unbroken case in Britain.’
      • ‘There were breeds of all sorts talking and singing, having a good time.’
      • ‘One of the new breed of sneaker brands is straight outta Orange County.’
      • ‘We must find a way to accommodate both breeds of military professional.’
      • ‘It was said that entrepreneurs were a special breed, more driven to succeed than the rest of us.’
      • ‘It was as if a new species, a new breed of humans had come into my knowledge.’
      • ‘I am currently dating one of the dominant species of my breed.’
      • ‘He was a transition figure - the last of the World War II heroic generals and the first of a new breed, the managerial generals.’
      • ‘If you're a fan of the old-school jungle sound or even part of the new breed of fans, pick up this mix.’
      • ‘I present a new breed of cultural critic, unleashing a fresh brand of polysyllabic pontification.’
      • ‘There's a whole new breed of this kind of activity and it's on the Internet.’
      • ‘The new breed of woman writer has a $500,000 first contract and a very specific aesthetic and social profile.’
      • ‘By contrast, her second husband seems another breed entirely.’
      • ‘It's also nice to see a variety show again and any star that can bring that breed of show back to life can't be all bad.’
      • ‘Meanwhile a new breed of artists was advancing another brand of banality, with divisive effects on the art world.’
      • ‘Lots of industry people there for that strange breed of person who enjoy that sort of thing.’
      • ‘It takes a certain kind of breed of person to jump on the back of a bull.’
      type, kind, sort, variety, class, genre, genus, order, calibre, brand, generation, vintage
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • a breed apart

    • A sort or kind or person that is very different from the norm.

      ‘Japanese capitalism is a breed apart from that found in the US’
      • ‘These ghosts are a breed apart from the usual homeless types who inhabit such dwellings.’
      • ‘English directors are a breed apart and unlike anything we have in this country.’
      • ‘While the Danes, Swedes and Norwegians are of the same race with similar languages, the Finns are a breed apart.’
      • ‘Regular callers to these programmes are a breed apart.’
      • ‘Diplomacy enthusiasts have always been a breed apart from the mainstream of the hobby.’
  • a dying breed

    • A sort or kind of person that is slowly disappearing.

      ‘the country's dying breed of elder statesmen’
      • ‘The men and women who practice this art and create durable, functional, and practical furniture are among a dying breed.’
      • ‘I know I'm almost the last of a dying breed: one of the few career stage actors left in the world.’
      • ‘Restaurants like the Shamrock are a dying breed in Vancouver.’
      • ‘And you ask why chivalrous men are a dying breed?’
      • ‘Windsurfers may be a dying breed in the United States, but the sport is alive and kicking on the Italian Riviera.’
      • ‘But I wonder if that huggable American tourist is a dying breed.’
      • ‘Environmentalists, in the traditional single-issue sense, are a dying breed.’
      • ‘The pair is part of a dying breed of music partnerships.’
      • ‘Screen Art is one of the last of a dying breed in that area.’
      • ‘But I hope they are a dying breed, when it comes to layout anyway.’

Origin

Old English brēdan ‘produce (offspring), bear (a child)’, of Germanic origin; related to German brüten, also to brood.

Pronunciation

breed

/brid//brēd/